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The problem is that you have passed E as parameter to Comparable but it is not defined. Generally the class which implements Comparable, pass itself as parameter to Comparable(as generic parameter). Comparable should be used to compare instances of the same type. But if you look at your implementation you are not comparing two instances of this class you are ...


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You can not do that for the same reason that you can not do Collection<Point> x = new Collection<>(); without implement the methods from the Interface Collection, i.e., providing a concrete implementation of that interface (e.g., ArrayList). For instance you can do .collect(toCollection(ArrayList::new)); or .collect(toCollection((() -> new ...


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You can implement it somehow like this: trait MyTrait<V: Sized + Fn() -> &'static str>: Sized { fn construct(fun: V) -> Self; fn get_fn(&self) -> &V; fn call_inner(&self) { println!("{}", (self.get_fn())()); } } struct FuncitonContainer<V> where V: Sized + Fn() -> &'static str,...


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You can associate specific functions when implementing a trait (didn't knew about this until now): fn func() -> String { String::from("hello") } trait MyTrait { const FUNC: fn() -> String; } struct MyType; impl MyTrait for MyType { const FUNC: fn() -> String = func; } fn main() { println!("{}", (MyType::FUNC)()...


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You are calling a compareTo method within the E type - which doesn't have this method. By implementing the interface, your class inherites the method, not an unknown type parameter class. Meaning: You have to create the custom comparing mechanics in the Node class. (Note: you can also check if E implements Comparable, but it is more difficult, and might not ...


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