5

The observed behavior is because of variable shadowing: func (rr *rot13Reader) Read(b []byte) (n int, err error) { // <-- this 'err' rb := make([]byte, 8) var ttl int for { n, err := rr.r.Read(rb) // <-- and this 'err' are different if err == io.EOF { return ttl, io.EOF // break <------------------...


4

It happens, because your calls invoke each other, this public new void DoSomething() => base.DoSomething(); is calling base method, which is protected void DoSomething() => ((X)this).DoSomething(); this instance is casted to X type, which is implemented by A and B obviously, ((X)this).DoSomething(); calls DoSomething() from B class and you are getting ...


4

In c#, the way to require field initialization is to provide them as constructor arguments. public class Notification : INotification { public Notification(string id, int type, IList<Message> messages) { this.Id = id; this.Type = type; this.Messages = messages; } public string Id { get; set; } public int ...


4

It creates an object of an anonymous class which implements the Message interface. The kind of expression you used to create the object is defined by the Java Language Specification as a class instance creation expression with an anonymous class declaration: If the class instance creation expression ends in a class body, then the class being instantiated ...


3

The type inference for the options parameter within the parameter list via myFoo: Foo is Params | undefined, regardless of whether a default value is provided in the implementation. Only in the body of myFoo does it infer options as Params because of the default value: // hover over options here: Params | undefined const myFoo: Foo = (options = {}) => { ...


1

I think, the best approach will be like this class Utils { public void datePicker(Context mContext, EditText et) { if (android.os.Build.VERSION.SDK_INT >= android.os.Build.VERSION_CODES.N) { final Calendar myCalendar = Calendar.getInstance(); year = myCalendar.get(Calendar.YEAR); month = myCalendar.get(...


1

I took another look at the project-level build.gradle and found it. Android Studio was suggesting to update the Kotline version again. I changed it to ext.kotlin_version = '1.3.61' and now I can compile.


1

{ [K in T]: T[K] extends Function ? undefined : T[K] } You can use a mapped conditional type for that.


1

This is from the typescript documentation (https://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/advanced-types.html#conditional-types) and works: type NonFunctionPropertyNames<T> = { [K in keyof T]: T[K] extends Function ? never : K }[keyof T]; type Data<T> = Pick<T, NonFunctionPropertyNames<T>>; Thanks everyone!


1

Interfaces have no inheritance or an idea of overwriting something. All you avoid here with the "new" is a Name Conflict. You implement a new Property, with incidently the same name. Everything else will work as usually. When implementing IBar on a class, you have the possibility of defining a public property, this will serve as both Name properties. The ...


1

Let's go step by step. Java Documentations says: In the Java programming language, an interface is a reference type, similar to a class, that can contain only constants, method signatures, default methods, static methods, and nested types. I emboldened method signatures because your interfaces only has method signatures. Methods which does not have a ...


1

On first look I can see that you have not implemented all methods of your interface in your implementation class (ParseTika) You need to add the following 3 methods that are missing from your class; IndexedFile indexedFile(Attachment attachment) throws AttachmentParserException{ //your code here } String getName(){ //your code here } String ...


1

Kaya3 already explained the theory very well above. Based on this I want to put "meat around the bones": You implemented the Message interface as an anonymous class, see below commented (1 a-c ): displayMessage( // 3) instance used as argument new Message() // 1a + 2) declare implemented interface + instanciate with `new` plus constructor { // ...


1

Function as a class can have state. For example you could store the last invocations and use the history as a cache: class Divider : (Int, Int) -> Double { val history = mutableMapOf<Pair<Int, Int>, Double>() override fun invoke(numerator: Int, denominator: Int): Double { return history.computeIfAbsent(Pair(numerator, ...


1

It's because your OperationsFactory returns an Operation rather than a properly genericized Operation<X, Y>, so if you assign it to findOperation of type Operation<InputStream, String>, you get this warning (because the compiler can't assure you assign the right type). Sadly, you can't add generics to enums (it's on a future Java feature list), ...


1

Notice the absence of type parameters here: public static Operation create(OperationType type) { // ^ isn't something supposed to be there? This is known as raw type, and is effectively equivalent with Operation<Object, Object>, however, it can be assigned to Operation<A, B> for any A and B. What language is pushing you to ...


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