14

list.stream() .map(s -> s.substring(0, 1).toUpperCase() + s.substring(1).toLowerCase()) .sorted(Comparator.comparingInt(String::length)) .forEach(System.out::println); For readability, the line performing capitalisation should be moved into a method, public class StringUtils { public static String capitalise(String s) { return s....


13

Something like this should suffice: list.stream() .map(n -> n.toLowerCase()) .sorted(Comparator.comparingInt(String::length)) .map(s -> Character.toUpperCase(s.charAt(0)) + s.substring(1)) .forEachOrdered(n -> System.out.println(n)); note that I've changed the comparator, which is essentially the idiomatic approach to do it. I'...


13

It should be: List<Integer> flattened = list .stream() .filter (Optional::isPresent) .map(Optional::get) .collect(Collectors.toList()); Your flatMap expects a function that transforms a Stream element to a Stream. You should use map instead (to extract the value of the Optional). In addition, you need to filter out empty Optionals (...


12

Explanation since you're working with an IntStream it only has one overload of the sorted method and it's the natural order (which makes sense). instead, box the stream from IntStream to Stream<Integer> then it should suffice: IntStream.range(1, 100) .filter(x -> x % 2 != 0) .boxed() // <--- boxed to Stream<Integer> ...


11

Though you might be looking just for Stream.of(1,2,3).forEach(list::add); // adding all to `list` why does the first example compile if List interface has following signature boolean add(E e) Primarily because the return type of the method is ignored in the first call. This is what it expands to: Stream.of(1,2,3).forEach(new Consumer<Integer>()...


9

Yes, using a Stream with reduce: MyObject myObject = listofThings.stream() .reduce(new MyObject(), MyObject::combine, MyObject::combiner); where combiner is a MyObject method that takes another MyObject instance and combines it into the current ...


9

use a lambda: map.entrySet() .stream() .map(e -> new MyObject(e.getKey(), e.getValue())) .collect(Collectors.toList()); otherwise the only way to use a method reference is by creating a function as such: private static MyObject apply(Map.Entry<String, String> e) { return new MyObject(e.getKey(), e.getValue()); } then do something ...


9

There are several different approaches in which you can accomplish the task at hand. forEach + computeIfAbsent Map<Long, List<String>> map = new HashMap<>(); listEntityComposite.forEach(e -> map.computeIfAbsent(e.getId().getFirstId(), k -> new ArrayList<>()).add(e.getSecond())); enumerates over the elements ...


9

After .map(a -> a.getPurchases()), you appear to be expecting a Stream<Purchase>, but what you really have is a Stream<Set<Purchase>>. If a Stream<Purchase> is indeed what you want, instead you should use .flatMap(a -> a.getPurchases().stream())


8

It's ambiguous because the static and non-static toString() methods are both compatible with the functional signature Integer -> String. You can use String::valueOf instead.


8

This would be alot easier/compact without a stream: map.forEach((k, v) -> v.forEach(e -> print(k, e)));


8

collect is a more suitable terminal operation for generating an output Map than forEach. You can use collect() with Collectors.groupingBy: Map<Long, List<String>> listOfLists = listEntityComposite.stream() .collect(Collectors.groupingBy(e -> e.getId().getFirstId(), ...


7

If there are only two levels of nesting, not deeper lists within lists recursively, then here's one way to flatten it: List<String> flat = objects.stream() .filter(Objects::nonNull) .flatMap(v -> { if (v instanceof String) { return Stream.of((String) v); } return ((List<String>) v).stream().filter(Objects::nonNull); }) ...


6

If you intend to report the exception (which is a good idea), you should never map it to null in the first place. Since certain functional interfaces do not allow to throw a checked exception, you should rethrow it wrapped in an unchecked exception: try { List<Object> result = list.stream().map(ob-> { try { // cannot throw ...


6

It uses ? extends R to allow functions taken by map to be declared as returning a subtype of R For example, given this stream: Stream<Number> numberStream = Stream.of(1, 2L); In the following map call, R is Number, but the function is of type Function<Number, Integer>: Function<Number, Integer> function = n -> Integer.valueOf(n....


6

<R> Stream<R> flatMap(Function<? super T, ? extends Stream<? extends R>> mapper); A Stream#flatMap mapper expects a Stream to be returned. You are returning a String[]. To turn a String[] into a Stream<String>, use Arrays.stream(a.split(" ")). The complete answer to your assignment: public static Map<Integer, List<...


5

You're mostly looking out for: Optional<YourObject> recentObject = list.stream() .filter(object -> object.getId() == id && object.getCancelDate() == null && object.getEarliestDate() != null) .max(Comparator.comparing(YourObject::getEarliestDate)); // max of the date for recency From LocalDate.compareTo Compares ...


5

employeeList.stream() .filter(x -> "XXX".equals(x.getEmployeeName())) .findFirst() .map(Employee::getDepartmets) .orElse(Collections.emptyList()); First filter by name and get the first one found. If present map it to those departments, else produce an empty list.


5

You can't put Integer::toString because Integer has two implementations that fit to functional interface Function<Integer, String>, but you can use String::valueOf instead: Stream.iterate(0, i -> i + 1) .limit(100) .map(String::valueOf) .collect(Collectors.toList())


5

You're looking for findFirst or findAny: empList.stream() .filter(x -> x.getName().equals(employeeName)) .findFirst() or empList.stream() .filter(x -> x.getName().equals(employeeName)) .findAny(); However, I'd suggest changing the method return type with the use of Optional which is intended for use as a method return type where ...


5

So my question is: How can I get, using Java Streams, the date that got the most 'YES'. This is going to be a lengthy one... we need to get to a position where we have a Stream<LocalDateTime> so we can later group by date applying a counting downstream collector to get the number of votes on that specific date and we can accomplish this structure ...


5

Can some tell me what am I doing wrong? You violate the Side-effects principle of java-stream which in a nutshell says that a stream shouldn't modify another collection while performing the actions through the pipelines. I haven't tested your code, however, this is not a way you should treat streams. How to do it better? Simply use the List::contains in ...


4

This will locate the first Employee matching the given name, or null if not found: Employee employee = empList.stream() .filter(x -> x.getName().equals(employeeName)) .findFirst() .orElse(null);


4

Calling get() straight after map will yield an exception if the Optional has an empty state, instead call orElse after map and provide a default value: paymentTenders.stream() .filter(pt -> (pt.getFlag() == Flag.N || pt.getFlag() == null)) .findFirst() .map(PaymentTender::getId) .orElse(someDefaultValue); ...


4

Your approach is rather inefficient, just chain the methods: collectionEntityDTO.stream() .map(EntityDTO::getId) .map(IdDTO::getCode) .toArray(Long[]::new); This approach is better because: It’s easier to read what’s going on It’s more efficient as already mentioned as doesn't require eagerly creating new collection objects at each ...


4

Since you want to return the result map of the first Result element to pass your filter, you can obtain it with findFirst(): Optional<Map<String,Integer>> resultMap = resultList.stream() .filter(result->"xxx".equals(result.getName())) .map(Result::getResultMap) .findFirst(); You can extract the ...


4

You can keep the key by creating new Entrys: keyToValuesMap.entrySet() .stream() .flatMap(entry -> entry.getValue() .stream() .map(v -> new SimpleEntry(entry.getKey(),v))) .forEach(entry -> printEntry(entry));


4

If that is your real code, then it may be more efficient to use IntStream.iterate and generate numbers from 99 to 0: IntStream.iterate(99, i -> i - 1) .limit(100) .filter(x -> x % 2 != 0) .forEachOrdered(System.out::println);


4

How about simple util such as : private IntStream reverseSort(int from, int to) { return IntStream.range(from, to) .filter(x -> x % 2 != 0) .sorted() .map(i -> to - i + from - 1); } Credits: Stuart Marks for the reverse util.


4

Given not all the values of the map are integers, you'll need to first check whether the element is an Integer then map it and then check whether it's less than five and if so then print the element. map1.values() .stream() .filter(e -> e instanceof Integer) // is this number an integer? if yes then you can pass else no .map(e -> (Integer)...


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