15

No. This will compile to essentially the same bytecode. The second version is just a more concise way to write it. Example code: void foo(List<String> strings) { strings.stream() .map( a -> { String abc; abc = a.replace("a", "*"); return abc; }) .collect(Collectors.toList()); } ...


10

It looks like your stream code is wrong. Specifically, you're comparing the Person object to 20, when you should be comparing Person.getAge(). The code below works for me: List<String> names = listP.stream() .filter(person -> person.getAge() > 20) .map(Person::getName) .collect(Collectors.toList()); P.S. That Person::...


10

A simple Collectors::groupingBy should do the trick: Map<String, List<String>> prefixGrouping = list1.stream() .collect( Collectors.groupingBy( item -> fooBarList.stream().filter(item::startsWith).findFirst().orElse("") ) ); Input: list1=["FOO1234", "FOO1111", "BAR1", "BARRRRR", "LOL"], fooBarList=["FOO",...


8

You can break the Map into key-value pairs (where each key and value is a single String) by using flatMap, and then collect them as you wish: Map<String,Set<String>> rev = original.entrySet () .stream () .flatMap (e -> e.getValue () .stream () .map (v -> ...


7

You can flatMap the entries of the map into Bs. List<B> bList = map.entrySet().stream() // a B(key, value) for each of the items in the list in the entry .flatMap(e -> e.getValue().stream().map(a -> new B(e.getKey(), a))) .collect(toList());


7

Use toMap instead of groupingBy: Map<String, Book> booksByAsinAndTitle = books.stream() .collect(Collectors.toMap(b -> b.getAsin() + "||" + b.getTitle(), Function.identity())); If the key according to which you are grouping is unique, there's no reason to use groupingBy. If your key may not be ...


7

As pointed out by ernest_k, you seem to be missing the collect there : Collection<Pair<Application, FileObject>> files = applications.stream() .flatMap(app -> files.stream().map(file -> Pair.of(app, file))) .collect(Collectors.toList()); // any collection you want Edit: Since, streamOfFiles is getting consumed at a single ...


6

How to quit execution if first value present, and not execute second method? Stream#findFirst is a short-circuiting terminal operation. However, the methods are being invoked when you call Stream.of(first(), second()). This can be proven with the following snippet: Optional<String> s = Stream.of(first(), second()) .peek($ -&...


6

You're passing to concat two Stream<IntStream>, which won't work (you want a stream of integers). You need to give it two Stream<Integer>: List<String> strings72to200 = Stream .concat(IntStream.range(72, 129).boxed(), IntStream.range(132, 200).boxed()) .map(String::valueOf) .collect(Collectors....


6

Possibly a way to iterate over the list and assign the values to respective index in the array as: IntStream.range(0, li.size()) .forEach(i -> ch[i] = (char) li.get(i).intValue()); or if primitives are not a must, then something like: Character[] ch = li.stream() .map(i -> (char) i.intValue()) .toArray(...


5

You need to apply the function that you've created as: List<DBAnimalDTO> dbAnimals = animals.stream().map(animal -> { if (animal instanceof Dog) { return dogFunction.apply((Dog) animal); } else { return catFunction.apply((Cat) animal); } }).collect(Collectors.toList()); On the other hand, using a constructor in the ...


5

There are few problems with your Comparator. First is that each time you call reversed() you are reversing all previous settings of comparator. So your comparator represents (see steps in comments, FieldX reduced to Fx) Comparator.comparing(MyDetail::getField11) // F1 ASC .reversed() //~(F1 ASC) ...


5

Instead of creating nested groups by using cascaded Collectors.groupingBy, you should group by a composite key: Map<List<Object>, List<String>> map = strings.stream() .collect(Collectors.groupingBy(s -> Arrays.asList(s.charAt(0), s.length()))); Then, simply grab the map values: List<List<String>> result = new ...


5

A more imperative but simpler solution would be using forEach : Map<String, Set<String>> original,result; // initialised original.forEach((key, value) -> value.forEach(v -> result.computeIfAbsent(v, k -> new HashSet<>()).add(key)));


4

Here is another one. // using SimpleEntry from java.util.AbstractMap Set<Student> list = new HashSet<>(studentStream .flatMap(student -> student.getSubjects().stream() .map(subject -> new SimpleEntry<>(subject, student))) .collect(Collectors.toMap(Entry::getKey, Entry::getValue, (l, r) -> Student.SENTINEL_VALUE) ...


4

First, the combiner function does not need to get called if you aren't using multiple threads (parallel stream). The combiner gets called to combine the results of the operation on chunks of your stream. There is no parallelism here so the combiner doesn't need to be called. You are getting zero values because of your accumulator function. The expression ...


4

You don't need to group your books if you are sure that the keys are unique. Map<String, Book> booksByAsinAndTitle = books.stream() .collect(Collectors.toMap(book -> book.getAsin() + "||" + book.getTitle(), x -> x));


4

You might just be looking for boxed there to get a Stream<Integer> and then concatenate : List<String> strings72to200 = Stream.concat( IntStream.range(72, 129).boxed(), // to convert to Stream<Integer> IntStream.range(132, 200).boxed()) .map(String::valueOf) // replaced with method reference ....


4

You need to collect the elements there and hence the type would be inferred: Collection<String> fields = Arrays.stream(s) // Arrays.asList(s).stream() .map(TableField::getValue) // map(v -> v.getValue()) .collect(Collectors.toList()); // or any other collection using 'Collectors.toCollection(<type>::new)'


4

You can't reuse streamOfFiles Stream while iterating over applications! You need to transform streamOfFiles from a Stream<FileObject> to List<FileObject> and then: List<FileObject> listOfFiles = streamOfFiles.collect(Collectors.toList()); List<Application> applications = this.applicationDao.findAll(); Collection<Pair<...


4

Generally speaking, a for loop over a list of instances of class A that creates an instance of a class B for each item in the original list can be turned into List<A> as = .... ; List<B> = as.stream().map(a -> createB(a)).collect(Collectors.toList()); where private B createB(A a) { //returns new B() based on given a } When for each item in ...


3

Assuming that the rest of the logic would have a sequential check of each attribute to add to the filtering condition. You can move such logic to equals(along with hashCode) implementation within the object itself and then again use a simpler stream pipeline as : List<LocationVO> filterList(List<LocationVO> input, LocationVO elem) { return ...


3

I already understand why count() returns a long but why have sum() return a narrower return type than count()? sum() returns the sum of the items in the stream, so the type returned matches the type of the stream. LongStream.sum() returns long. The count() is not directly related to the type of the objects coming from the stream, and to conform with the ...


3

count() returns a long but why have sum() return a narrower return type than count()? From the Javadocs, IntStream.count happens to be a special case of reduction return mapToLong(e -> 1L).sum(); which is why it returns a long. Further IntStream.sum is again a special reduction which internally uses Integer.sum return reduce(0, Integer::sum) // ...


3

The sum method returns an int because the sum of two ints is an int. The Javadoc for count says that it's equivalent to mapToLong(e -> 1L).sum(). You could use that to make your own counting that returns an int, like this: return IntStream.rangeClosed(1,n) .filter(e -> (e % 5) == 0) .map(e -> 1) .sum(); Or, because you ...


3

A simple forEach solution for that would be : List<B> bList = new ArrayList<>(); map.forEach((key, value) -> value.forEach(val -> bList.add(new B(key, val))));


3

It seems that you think that Stream.of(keys) will create a Stream<String>, but that is not the case. To create a Stream from an Iterable, you should use StreamSupport#stream: public Map<String, T> loadAll(Iterable<? extends String> keys) { return StreamSupport.stream(keys.spliterator(), false) .collect(...


3

You could write this yourself: from collections import UserList class JavaLike(UserList): def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs): super().__init__(*args, **kwargs) self.iter = None def stream(self): self.iter = None return self def filter(self, function): self.iter = filter(function, self if self.iter is ...


3

You have an explanation as to why the current collector does not work from rgettman. It is worth checking to see what helper methods exist to create custom collectors. For example, this entire collector can be defined far more concisely as: reducing(0.f, v -> v.v1 * v.v2, (a, b) -> a + b) It is not always possible to use methods like these; but the ...


3

You can probably do it in a simpler way as : Stream<Student> studentStream = Stream.of(stud1, stud2, stud3); // collect all the unique subjects into a Set Set<String> uniqueSubjects = studentStream .flatMap(st -> st.getSubjects().stream() .map(subj -> new AbstractMap.SimpleEntry<>(st.getName(), subj))) ...


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