Hot answers tagged

5

I have fixed this issue two months ago. Please make sure your rmarkdown version is at least v1.16. Once again, when in doubt, consider updating your packages: update.packages(ask = FALSE, checkBuilt = TRUE)


5

This is a bug in bookdown that I just fixed on Github. You may try the development version of bookdown via remotes::install_github('rstudio/bookdown').


4

The chunk option fig.keep can take a numeric vector to index the plots, so you can choose the last three plots via fig.keep = 2:4 (or remove the first plot via fig.keep = -1). To group plots on different slides, you can dynamically add slide titles. You can either use cat('\n\n## Title\n\n') with the chunk option results = 'asis', or with knitr::asis_output(...


3

It has nothing to do with parameters, which can be shown by the minimized reprex below (test.Rmd) by taking out the parameters (and the irrelevant tidyverse): --- title: "Untitled" --- ```{r, cache=TRUE} Sys.sleep(10) ``` Then run for (i in 1:5) rmarkdown::render( "test.Rmd", output_file = paste0("file", i, ".html") ) The problem comes from ...


3

Use of reticulate::source_python could be one solution. For example, here is a simple .R script which will be spun to .Rmd and then rendered to .html spin-me.R #'--- #'title: R and Python in a spin file. #'--- #' #' This is an example of one way to write one R script, containing both R and #' python, and can be spun to .Rmd via knitr::spin. #' #+ label = "...


3

Just write your string to a temp file, and convert that. I recommend using rmarkdown::render instead of knitr::pandoc; they both call pandoc, but the former sets all the options for you: x <- "Here is some _great_ text in a **variable** and some blank spaces ____." infile <- tempfile(fileext=".md") writeLines(x, infile) outfile <- rmarkdown::...


2

The bib file generated by RefManageR on your system does not use UTF-8 encoding, which is incompatible with what biber expects. Before generating a bib file, set the default encoding for output files using options(encoding = "UTF-8")


2

According to the release notes you linked, cslreferences was introduced in version 2.8, including a suitable definition of this environment in the pandoc template. However, Rmarkdown is using its own template (C:\Users\gcb7\Documents\R\win-library\3.6\rmarkdown\rmd\latex\default-1.17.0.2.tex in your case), which does not have this definition. This has been ...


2

Do the below changes in your code h1, h2, h3 { font-family: 'Josefin Sans', serif; font-weight: normal; } Right Way -> font-family: 'Josefin Sans', serif; Wrong Way -> font-family: 'Josefin Sans, serif';


1

At the moment, the mirror https://mirror.unpad.ac.id does not seem to have a valid SSL certificate, so the site is not accessible. You can find other accessible mirrors at https://ctan.org/mirrors/mirmon. To specify the mirror, use the repository argument. Below are two possible examples: tinytex::install_tinytex(repository = 'http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/pub/...


1

Why not rename the columns up front, and use the formatted column names in subsequent calls to filter and select? library(tidyverse) rename(iris, `Sepal length` = Sepal.Length, `Sepal width` = Sepal.Width) %>% filter(Species == "setosa") %>% select(contains("Sepal"), Species) %>% head() %>% knitr::kable() | Sepal length| Sepal ...


1

Here's a trick I'm using in case you can't find an easy way (on ubuntu, after installing pdftk): Aside from the rmd file, I create an R script which edits the pdf generated by the rmd file and splits it into smaller pdfs. example: # 1 KNIT THE RMD FILE AND GENERATE A SINGLE PDF WITH ALL THE PAGES rmarkdown::render('~/my_rmd_file.Rmd') # 2 CUT THE FIRST ...


1

It is difficult to answer without having all the code. And code is almost always better than a screenshot. My guess is that you loaded the dataset X2019THBrier manually in RStudio. Thus you can access it in chunks, in the current R session, but not in the knitted R session. You need to write commands to load the data. As you are loading an XLSX file, you ...


1

A correlation is always between two variables so I am unsure wether this is what you want, but the following code will display the correlation of all pairs of variables that are greater than 0.5 in absolute value. --- title: "Untitled" author: "Author" date: "18 November 2019" output: pdf_document --- ```{r setup, include=FALSE} knitr::opts_chunk$set(echo =...


1

I finally managed to put together an approach which is working - I believe - perfectly, although it has some not-really-elegant solutions, and therefore there is very likely (a lot of) room for improvement. My approach produces two types of presentations - in addition to the default three formats in Bookdown - at the same time (from the same source). One is ...


1

You could use the beamerarticle package to build an article class document from the beamer sources. I couldn't convince rmarkdown to build both documents at the same time, but the following works with alternating the header between the lines for the beamer output and the article document and renaming the output file in between: --- output: ...


1

I don't think you can quite pass it another set of values, but there are a couple of options that you might find workable. One thing to note first is that color_bar() can accept two values - a color, and a function that will take the vector of values and transform them to numbers between 0 and 1. By default, that function is formattable::proportion(), which ...


1

Remove the set_width() and set_col_width() lines. You'll then get a reasonable width by default.


1

SOLVED Issue: knitting of special characters like “ö, ü, ß” in .RMD files (even though encoded in UTF-8) fails on Windows 10, markdown version => 1.0 and R version < 3.6.0. Solution: update R.


1

So after being stuck on this for a long time, I discovered just after posting this that the solution is simply to add escape=FALSE to the example with format="html".


1

sos-rmarkdown provides yet another Rmarkdown to Jupyter notebook converter. The unique features include its support for inline expressions using markdown-kernel, use of multiple kernels in one notebook (using a SoS kernel) to accommodate code blocks in multiple languages, and the ability to execute generated notebook using sos-papermill. It also uses cell ...


1

You can use minipage to achieve the desired output. For example. \documentclass[pdf, t, 10pt]{beamer} \usetheme{Antibes} \mode<presentation>{} \usepackage{array} \newcolumntype{R}[1]{>{\raggedleft\arraybackslash\hspace{0pt}}p{#1}} \begin{document} \begin{frame}[fragile] \frametitle{Table and Graphics} \framesubtitle{Side-by-Side via minipage} ...


1

The results = 'hide' option doesn't prevent other messages to be printed. To hide them, the following options are useful: {r, error=FALSE} {r, warning=FALSE} {r, message=FALSE} In every case, the corresponding warning, error or message will be printed to the console instead.


1

Bit of a late response, but I have just been working on this. Loading the kableExtra package and including some restrictions in the kable_styling options seems to do the trick. Particularly latex_options = c("hold_position") --- title: "Reproducible Error" author: "Rex Macey" date: "February 14, 2017" output: pdf_document header-includes: - \usepackage{...


1

The key to this problem is putting the call to myFun as a code chunk with results = "asis" as an option. I made a couple small edits to myFun to make it easier to see the results. See below: #' --- #' title: "My Doc" #' author: "ME" #' date: "January 28, 2017" #' --- #+ label = "setup", include = FALSE library(ggplot2) myFun = function(){ for(i in seq(...


1

This is basically @JeffKeller's answer but instead of having a separate CSS file and fiddling around in the YAML header you can just write your CSS inside your .Rmd file as a code snippet! For example, ```{css, echo=FALSE} pre, code {white-space:pre !important; overflow-x:auto} ``` I tend to do this at about the same early point where I do other bits of ...


1

While @Konrad Rudolph's attempt to fix the underlying problem (that prevents usage of envir=baseenv()) of the R package system's reliance on the global.env is very admirable, it might in most cases be more practical to knit/render R markdown files in a separate process through callr using a function like render_separately <- function(...) callr::r( ...


1

You have to load the knitr library first, try this: ```{r setoptions, echo=FALSE} library(knitr) opts_chunk$set(cache = TRUE, fig.path = "DFSurveyImages/", dev = "pdf")```


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