3

getGlobalNamespace(L) .beginClass<A>("A") .addConstructor() .endClass() .deriveClass<B1, A>("B1") .addConstructor() .endClass() .deriveClass<B2, A>("B2") .addConstructor<void(*)(void)>() .endClass()


3

Probably not and the need to do so could show a design mistake in your code. Preform the cast in C++, you know far more about the types than Lua does, so that either the function Bar accepts a Foo* or does the downcast before calling the function.


3

One possible solution is to have a LuaListener class in your C++ code that contains a "pointer" to the Lua function, and a Lua-specific setListener function that is called from the Lua script that takes a Lua function as argument, and creates a LuaListener instance and passes that to the actual C++ setListener. So the Lua code would look something like ...


2

Since this question has received zero comments or answers, I've decided not to rule out other libraries. So, if there is a C++ library that supports enums, I will accept it The Thor library, an SFML extension, supports conversions between SFML key types and strings. This would help you serialize enumerators and pass them as strings to Lua -- and back if you ...


2

From the documentation of luaL_loadfileex: As lua_load, this function only loads the chunk; it does not run it. What that means is that the script is loaded, but it haven't been executed so there is really no variable nmbr to get. You need to run the script first for the code to work (for eample by calling lua_call). This is shown very well in the first ...


2

OK, so after hours of tweaking and trying I found the solution. It was the second line: lref_p.fromStack(l, -1); that was the problem. It should be lref_p = LuaRef::fromStack(l, -1); Also I found an easier and cleaner way of doing this: Person *pers = luabridge::Userdata::get<Person>(l, 1, false);


2

You have to explicitely convert your myTable[] to something << can handle. And your Lua array starts at 1, but you access [0].


2

I am sketching a small C++ program that will pass arrays to Lua The data will be float and the size will be really large, My suggestion: Keep the buffer on the C side (as a global variable for example) Expose a C-function to LUA GetTableValue(Index) Expose a C-function to Lua SetTableValue(Index, Value) It should be something like this: static int ...


1

I can reproduce your issue on Lua 5.2.0, but not on Lua 5.2.1 or any newer versions. My conclusion is that it's just a bug in versions of Lua prior to 5.2.1. Just update to a modern version of Lua and you shouldn't have the problem either.


1

I recommend you create a userdata that exposes the arrays via __index and __newindex, something like this (written as a C and C++ polyglot like Lua itself): #include <stdio.h> #include <string.h> #ifdef __cplusplus extern "C" { #endif #include <lua5.3/lua.h> #include <lua5.3/lauxlib.h> #ifdef __cplusplus } #endif struct ...


1

[string "1"] comes from the chunk name you provided here: std::to_string(current_id++).c_str() Since it doesn't start with @ it's treated as the string that was loaded, hence the [string ""] syntax. If you want the error message to treat it as a filename, put @ in front of the filename. And I suspect that the reason the line number is 0 ...


1

If you've registered your class using LuaBridge, then you have to push the Object pointer into the Lua State machine using the LuaBridge methods. LuaBridge pushes the pointer and then sets meta information on the object using lua_setmetatable. This metatable contains the actual description of the object. using namespace luabridge; // L = lua_state* // ...


1

So as I mentioned in my question, I suspected that the registration was not being done correctly. I still don;t fully understand the specifics, but I suspect that the function pointer cast is somehow changing the calling convention, so I changed the code to: .addFunction("__mul",&vec3::operator*); And it worked perfectly.


1

You cannot register the templated function. You have to register explicit instantiations. #include <iostream> #include <lua.hpp> #include <LuaBridge.h> char const script [] = "local t = Test()" "t:test_int(123)" "t:test_str('Hello')"; class Test { public: template < typename T > void test(T t) { std::cout << t <&...


1

According to the official Microsoft documentation, Windows searches for DLLs in the following directories: The directory where the executable module for the current process is located. The current directory. The Windows system directory. The GetSystemDirectory function retrieves the path of this directory. The Windows directory. The ...


1

It's possible to store luabridge::LuaRef's in C++ to call them later just as you normally call any other function. Though sometimes there's no need to store LuaRef's anywhere. Once you load the script, all functions stay in your lua_State, unless you set them to nil or override them by loading another script which uses the same names for functions. You can ...


1

luaL_loadfile ~= luaL_dofile. You load the script and get it as function on the stack but don't execute it, so the global assignment doesn't happen.


1

The template for addProperty: template <class TG, class TS> Class <T>& addProperty (char const* name, TG (T::* get) () const, void (T::* set) (TS)) requires that the getter is a const member function. Changing the getter to: int getNumber() const { return number; } removes the error in LuaBridge 2.0


1

if you only want enum to number, consider this. <luabridge/detail/Vector.h> methods. #include <LuaBridge/detail/Stack.h> enum class LogLevels { LOG_1, LOG_2 } namespace luabridge { template <> struct Stack<LogLevels> { static void push(lua_State* L, LogLevels const& v) { lua_pushnumber( L, static_cast<int&...


1

I managed to fix the problem. I added the self as an extra argument in the listener constructor and passed it as the first parameter to the callback function. -- in the script self.Callback = LuaCallback(self, self.printName) Helper.setCallback(self.Callback)


1

I took your code, added: local test = Test:new() test:printName() It gives me the correct output. My name is Test Object If you're calling it via C API, you have to remember to manually push the self argument onto the stack. Remember that: obj:fun() ~ obj.fun(obj)


1

The problem was that the luaL_openlibs(L); was after the script had been run. The problem was in the tutorial I was following, I encountered the same thing before in the beginning of my tries with lua. It all works perfectly by calling it after creating the new lua state.


1

An object declared as Type variableName is passed to Lua by value, as a copy managed by Lua. Hence var.d returns a copy of that d object, and with var.d.c you are modifying the c variable of that copy, not the c variable of the original d object. An object declared as Type* variableName is passed by reference, hence you modify the original d object, that's ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible