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The problem that you encounter is using a normal Python function for NumPy arrays. This does not work always as expected, especially when you use conditionals like <. You can simplify f as: import math def f(x,y): if x > y: return math.log(x-y) else: return 0.0 # or math.nan and than make a numpy ufunc from it using np....


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You need to prepare the plot data first: hour = df['Created Date'].dt.hour.rename('Hour') df_plot = df.groupby(hour).apply(lambda x: x['Open Data Channel Type'].value_counts() / x.shape[0]) \ .rename_axis(index=['Hour', 'Channel Type']) \ .to_frame('Frequency') \ .reset_index() A sample of df_plot: Hour Channel Type ...


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Here's one way, convert your 3d list of lists of lists into an ndarray, then slice it to select the u (x direction) component of each vector, and the v (y direction) component of each vector. then plot with matplotlib.pyplot.quiver() NOTE: for simplicity I started numbering vectors at 0, 0 instead of 1, 1 used in your initial question import numpy as np ...


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You can explicitly define the elements in the legend. For full control of which artists have a legend entry, it is possible to pass an iterable of legend artists followed by an iterable of legend labels respectively. Reference Example: arr1 = plt.arrow(0,0, 3,1, head_width=0.2, color='r', length_includes_head=True) arr2 = plt.arrow(0,0, 1,3, head_width=...


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Hope this helps: x = [1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9] y = [0, 0, 5, 8, 8, 8] classes = ['A', 'B', 'C'] values = [0, 0, 1, 2, 2, 2] scatter = plt.scatter(x, y,c=values, cmap='viridis') plt.legend(handles=scatter.legend_elements()[0], labels=classes) plt.show() Output:


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matplotlib.pyplot.bar returns a matplotlib.container.BarContainer, in which the individual bars are stored as matplotlib.patches.Rectangle objects. Given that The container can be treated as a tuple of the patches themselves. Additionally, you can access these and further parameters by the attributes You can extract the patch for the specific bar or ...


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You can call the function as much as you need! import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt from collections import Counter def my_funct(): np.random.seed(1223) # fixing the seed! but I don't think you need it #Random Number Generating x = np.random.randint(low=1, high=100, size=100000) counts = Counter(x) total = sum(counts.values()) ...


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You can modify the limits of the axis as you would normally with set_ylim() and set_xlim(). In this case plt.ylim([15000, 20000]) should restrict your plot to the 15-20 kHz range. For a complete example drawing from the Spectrogram Demo: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np np.random.seed(19680801) dt = 0.0005 t = np.arange(0.0, 20.0, dt) ...


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For measuring the distance between two such CDF plots as described in your criteria, you can use Kolmogorov–Smirnov test for equality between the two distributions. or you can use maximum point-wise distance of both CDFs. I think it might help.


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There's a number of ways you can do this and they vary depending on the specific use case but the one I use most often is from matplotlib import rcParams, rcParamsDefault rcParams.update(rcParamsDefault) Although it is likely the case that the tutorial is using a style other than the default so I wouldn't necessarily expect this to make your output look ...


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What I am understanding is that you have many images that you want to store in RAM. The first question you need to ask yourself is if you actually need to store them all at the same time? For example, can you read one, do some processing, and then only keep the result of the processing before reading the next image? When it comes to the actual storage, I do ...


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