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1

Assign the fit() call in Keras to a variable so you can track the metrics through the epochs. history = model.fit(tr_x, ... It will return a dictionary, access it like this: loss_hist = history.history['loss'] And then get the min(), max(), or whatever you want. np.min(loss_hist)


0

input_shape=(X_train.shape[1], 1) should fix the error, but maybe not the entire problem: how long is each sequence? LSTM full input shape (batch_shape) is (batch_size, timesteps, channels) - or, equivalently, (samples, timesteps, features) batch_size=32 in your .fit(), but if X_train dimension is (87472, 3), do you have 87472 samples (sequences) each of ...


1

The output has to be [0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0] if the label is 3. The y parameter you get from loadlocal_mnist has the direct label, so you need to "one-hot encode" y before your training. You can use the following code to do the encoding from mlxtend.preprocessing import one_hot from mlxtend.data import loadlocal_mnist X, y = loadlocal_mnist(...


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I ended up replacing the first dense layer with a Conv1D layer and the network now seems to be learning decently. It's overfitting to my data, but that's territory I'm okay with. I'm closing the thread for now, I'll spend some time playing with the architecture.


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Rescaling the data will lead to faster convergence when using methods like gradient descent. Also when your dataset features highly varying in magnitudes, using solution that includes eucliden distance can lead to bad results. In order to avoid it, scaling the features to range between 0.0 and 1.0 will be a wise solution. For the second question, you ...


1

the output of my very first layer is always zero. This typically means that the network does not "see" any pattern in the input at all, which causes it to always predict the mean of the target over the entire training set, regardless of input. Your output is in the range of -𝜋 to 𝜋 probably with an expected value of 0, so it checks out. My guess is that ...


0

When training you are showing your neural net x values between 0 and 10. During prediction you are using x values between 10 and 20. Those are values larger than what the net has ever seen before, so it will not be able to give you a nice sine wave. Neural nets can not extrapolate well when values are outside the range of what they have seen. If you want to ...


1

It is much easier to read if we give the parameters names and remove the consecutive .: feedForward :: [Float] -> [([Float], [[Float]])] -> [Float] feedForward actual_value bias_and_weights = foldl (\accumulator -- the accumulator, it is initialized as actual_value bias_and_weight -> -- a single value from bias_and_weights map tanh $ ...


1

I have noticed one minor mistake in your reporting through print - instead of: for i in range(5): print('%s => %d (expected %s)' % (X[i].tolist(), y_pred[i], y[i].tolist())) you should have: for i in range(len(y_test)): print('%s => %d (expected %s)' % (X[i].tolist(), y_pred[i], y_test[i].tolist())) At this print you will finally compare ...


0

As a non-expert in neural networks but with experience in statistical modelling, which seems like it would apply here: when you say it "should converge," why should it converge? And have you checked how many layers and how many weights/neurons per layer you're using? Or how many total independent parameters? Because based on how neural networks usually work,...


0

You should change the inception_module padding to padding="same". This will ensure that the height and width of the output tensor remains the same as the input tensor (32x32). def inception_module(x,chanDim): # x is the input and chanDim is the dimension at which the convolution is applied # channel dimension conv_1x1_64 = conv_module(x, 64, 1, ...


1

One approach is caliculate residual for the validation set, it will be having a distribution, calculate mean, variance of the residual distribution and if you are looking for 95% add +,- 2sigma to your prediction and that should be your prediction interval.


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My first though is using bootstrap and jackknife methodology. Using bootstrap method, you can compute empirical confidence interval for your prediction using sampling on your original dataset. But you can find other answers in this question


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model.save_weights() will only save the weights so if you need, you are able to apply them on a different architecture mode.save() will save the architecture of the model + the the weights + the training configuration + the state of the optimizer


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I ran into this issue recently. It's a very simple fix. All you have to do is put your tfrecord_dir into directory datasets, i.e. tfrecord_dir/datasets.


0

Quick Solution: add allow_unused=True to .grad functions. So, change dydx = torch.autograd.grad( y, x, grad_outputs=y.data.new(y.shape).fill_(1), create_graph=True, retain_graph=True)[0] d2ydx2 = torch.autograd.grad(dydx, x, grad_outputs=dydx.data.new( dydx.shape).fill_(1), create_graph=True, retain_graph=True)[0] To dydx = torch....


0

With tensorflow 2.0, you can write customize model and this allows you to compute derivative w.r.t. the input. For example, class MyModel(tf.keras.Model): def __init__(self): super(MyModel,self).__init__(name = 'my_model') self.dense_1 = layers.Dense(32,activation = 'relu', input_dim=2) self.dense_2 = layers.Dense(64,activation=...


3

Convolutional layers use the convolution operation i.e. sliding of a kernel (matrix) over the input and taking the sum of elementwise products at each position while sliding. Thus, the input dimensions will affect the output dimensions, however, it is not necessary to fix the input dimensions. Thus, the layer can be defined as nn.Conv2d(1, 32, 5) where 1 ...


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Have you considered preprocessing the data? It's rather rare to see noticeably important divergence with so high precision. It might be also hard to calculate meaningful gradient, when you only operate on such flat space.


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Same happened to me. Mine was in deeplearning4j JAVA library for image classification.It kept on giving the final output of the last training folder for every test. I was able to solve it by decreasing the learning rate. Approaches can be used : Lowering the learning rate. (First mine was 0.01 - lowering to 1e-4 and it worked) Increasing Batch Size (...


0

I find the previous answers here a bit overcomplicated - a projection layer is just a simple matrix multiplication, or in the context of NN, a regular/dense/linear layer, without the non-linear activation in the end (sigmoid/tanh/relu/etc.) The idea is to project the (e.g.) 100K-dimensions discrete vector into a 600-dimensions continuous vector (I chose the ...


2

I assume you are trying to use your object detection model on mobile devices. For which you need to convert your model to tflite version. But, you cannot convert models like fasterRCNN to tflite. You need to go for SSD models to be used for mobile devices. Another way to use model like fasterRCNN in your deployment is, Use AWS EC2 tensorflow AMI, deploy ...


0

Your sigmoid derivative was wrong, it should be as follows: public double sigmoidDerivative(double output) { return output * (1 - output); } } As I said in my comment, you have {1, 1} twice in your train input, so change one with {0, 0}. Finally, increase the number of iterations from 40 to 100,000.


0

Deep Cognition is very similar to what you're trying to achieve. You might be interested in some of the techniques like code generation. I suggest you start with a deep-learning framework such as pyTorch and keras etc as your backend, a single category of data e.g. Images. After deciding those some sort of initial GUI and code generation you'll get to your ...


1

weights_callback to get weights of each layer: weights_list = [] #[epoch][layer][unit(l-1)][unit(l)] def save_weights(model): inner_list = [] for layer in model.layers: inner_list.append(layer.get_weights()[0]) weights_list.append(inner_list) weights_callback = LambdaCallback(on_epoch_end = lambda batch, logs:save_weights(model)) ...


0

See this post: Your CPU supports instructions that this TensorFlow binary was not compiled to use: AVX AVX2 As said in the correct answer, Modern CPUs provide a lot of low-level instructions, besides the usual arithmetic and logic, known as extensions, e.g. SSE2, SSE4, AVX, etc. From the Wikipedia: The warning states that your CPU does support ...


0

Has the code been debugged line by line ? as this would trace to the line causing error. I assume the index error crops up from the below one - where "i" and further targets[i] , outs[i] can be checked for the values they have - per_sample_losses = loss_fn.call(targets[i], outs[i])


0

The classification outputs the results in the form of probabilities - your results are fine. Default threshold is 0.5 for converting probabilties to 2 classes say 0 and 1. You can fine-tune threshold - by moving up and low and further analysing the outcomes like false positives , false negatives ,precision-recall curves etc. depending upon what the objective ...


1

You have a number of issues in your code and it will be close to impossible to get it right in one go, but let's give it a try. There are two major issues: Currently you're trying to teach your neural network with very few training examples, as few as a single one per speaker (!). It's impossible for any machine learning algorithm to learn anything. To make ...


0

import numpy as np import pandas as pd import matplotlib.pyplot as plt from google.colab import files uploaded = files.upload() data = pd.read_csv('ex1data1.txt', header = None) #read from dataset m = len(data) # number of training example print(m) data.head(5) # view first few rows of the data data.describe() X = data.iloc[:,0] # read first column y = ...


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Never mind (this is my other account), if you have the same problem then type pip list and check if you have tf.nightly, if you do then you need to type in this command pip install tf.nightly-2.0-preview It should work.


1

Here is some general information. Yes, your testing percentage will generally always be worse than your training percentage. When you first initialize the network, both your testing and training percentage should be horrible, with both getting better over time. After some number of epochs, your model will start to 'over-train', meaning it decides ...


-2

Hard to say what is going on without knowing the data. In a nutshell your model seems to learn, but this learning does not result in an improvement of accuracy. This is well possible. It is not necessarily the case that train/test accuracy touches each other. What can you do: tune your model and make sure that it learns in a proper way. Try on the capacity ...


0

I think for beginners it's not obvious at all that the layer specification cannot passed directly into the train function. One must read the documentation very carefully to understand the following passage for ...: (..) Errors will occur if values for tuning parameters are passed here. So first, you must realize that the hidden parameter of the neuralnet::...


1

Seems to be a typo in the comment. They are actually computing gradient of loss w.r.t. w2 and w1. Let's quickly derive the gradient of loss w.r.t. w2 just to be sure. By inspection of your code we have Using the chain rule from calculus . Each term can be represented using the basic rules of matrix calculus. These turn out to be and . Plugging these ...


0

I found a solution def get_rotation_tensor(x): ones = K.ones_like(x[:, 0]) zeros = K.zeros_like(x[:, 0]) roll_mat = K.stack([[ones, zeros, zeros], [zeros, K.cos(x[:, 0]), -K.sin(x[:, 0])], [zeros, K.sin(x[:, 0]), K.cos(x[:, 0])]]) pitch_mat = K.stack([[K.cos(x[:, 1]), zeros, K.sin(x[:, 1])],...


2

Not clear if the OP still wants the answer but I will post the answer I linked in the comment with a few modifications. Timeseries datasets can be of different types, lets consider a dataset which has X as features and Y as labels. Depending on the problem Y might be a sample from X shifted in time or can also be another target variable you want to predict....


0

Softmax will give you probabilites out of the box. It's already implemented (I guess) in every DL package, i.e. tensorflow, torch ... Using classical models it might be a bit tricky, as you're basically doing regression and must supply probabilites as your ground truth. You might also consider different approach and learn distribution instead, optimizing ...


1

you have a multi-class prediction. As @user2974951 mentioned, use predict. Below I add on to show you have to interpret the results. And to note, if your predictors are 0 or 1, normalizing them is not going to change anything (see your function normalize). library(neuralnet) set.seed(1111) # training /testing data trn <- sample(1:nrow(iris),100) ...


0

I think it's the probability of your code. You should convert the probabilities to predictions. If you specify a threshold and use a simple if method (for ex. if a > threshold it will return 1, else 0) may be it can help you.


1

Epoch: One round forward Propagation and backward Propagation into the neural network at once.(dataset ) Example : One round of throwing the ball into the basket and finding out the error and come back and changing the weights.(f = ma) Forward propagation: The Process of initizing the mass and acceleration with random values and predicting the output ...


1

From what I understand, the equation for the second activation should be: Z2 = np.dot(A1, W2.T) + b2.T # Z2.shape = (m,3) A soft-max for Z2 could be performed as: o = np.exp(Z2)/np.sum(np.exp(Z2), axis=1) # o.shape = (m,3) The interpretation of the nth-column of o is the probability of your input belonging to the n-th class for each of the m input rows.


0

Despite the title, the paper by Salimans and Kingma suggests to decouple the weight norm and their direction, rather than actually normalising the weights (i.e. setting their l2 norm to one as you suggested). If you want to verify that your code has the intended effect even if it is not what they proposed, you can get the weights of the model and check ...


0

I think the problem might be that you are not normalizing the test data in your input_image function. Try to add a line where you divide the loaded image by 255.0 like you did in the case of the training set. See the code below: def input_image(filepath): img_size = 28 img_array = cv2.imread(filepath, cv2.IMREAD_GRAYSCALE) new_array = cv2....


0

For each feature you will have one weight. Thus you have two features and two weights. It also helps to introduce a bias which adds another weight. For more information about bias check this Role of Bias in Neural Networks. The weights indeed should learn how to fit the sample data best. Depending on the data this can mean that you will never reach error of ...


2

Whenever you perform forward operations using one of your model parameters (or any torch.tensor that has attribute requires_grad==True), pytorch builds a computational graph. When you operate on descendents in this graph, the graph is extended. In your case, you have a nn.module called model which will have some trainable model.parameters(), so pytorch will ...


2

Actually, if we have more hidden layer then we will get good predicted values and best accuracy for the dataset . So every node in the hidden layer will take one or more features from the dataset and it is going to apply the weights and activation function until we get the good predicted values. And it uses the backward propagation for updating the weights ...


0

From the tf.keras.utils.multi_gpu_model we can see that it works in the following way: Divide the model's input(s) into multiple sub-batches. Apply a model copy on each sub-batch. Every model copy is executed on a dedicated GPU. Concatenate the results (on CPU) into one big batch. You are triggering an error because the input of the CuDNNLSTM ...


0

I found out the reason: some parameters are sooooooooo large that they overwhelmed others. So output becomes similiar after sigmoid. Solution is l2 regulization. It worked for me.


1

It depends on what you mean by "initialized the network", you should show some snippet of code to make people understand your problem. In principle, k-fold cross validation is a technique used to have a better estimation of the performance of a model. The concept is easy, whithout k-fold you just split dataset into train/test, you use unseen samples in ...


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