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4

Why do we need to prove if the ethernet.data is an instance of the IP packet? Doesn't the ethernet data always contain the IP packet? No, it doesn't. For example, for an ARP Request, the Ethernet frame contains an ARP packet, not an IP packet. In ATA-over-Ethernet, as the name says, the Ethernet frame contains an encapsulated ATA packet, not IP. Then there ...


3

The optimal performance will depend on the hard drive, drive fragmentation, the filesystem, the OS and the processor. But optimal performance will never be achieved by writing small chunks of data that do not align well with the filesystem's disk structure. A simple solution would be to use a memory mapped file and let the OS asynchronously deal with ...


3

GetTcpTable() does not give you the destination IP of TCP packets. It merely gives you a list of currently listening TCP ports and active TCP connections. GetUdpTable() can give you the list of currently listening UDP ports, where UDP packets can be sent to. There are no connections in UDP. But, if you want to know the actual destination IP for each UDP ...


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At line 2, use raw instead of str. I extracted some frame from a pcap file as you did and here is what I get: >>> str(p) WARNING: Calling str(pkt) on Python 3 makes no sense! "b'\\xf4\\xca\\xe5Cu\\...


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Yes. It's possible to create and send UDP packets with a spoofed IP address using a raw socket. Raw sockets allow applications to create their own IP headers including the source address fields. Look around for examples in whatever language you write in. However, creating and sending such a packet doesn't mean that the networks along the way to the recipient ...


2

Steffen Ullrich is 100% correct here. If you're going to call any routine that returns a pcap_t *, such as pcap_open_live(), you must check to make sure it succeeds, by checking whether it returns a null pointer or not: handle = pcap_open_live("eth3", BUFSIZ, 1, 1000, errbuf); if (handle != NULL) { fprintf(stderr, "Can't open eth3: %s\n", errbuf); ...


2

HTTP/2 packets are sent as one or more TCP packets. In the same way as TCP packets are ultimately sent as IP packets (or datagrams). This does mean that even though HTTP/2 has multiplexing at the application layer (HTTP) it does not have truly independent streams at a transport layer (TCP), and one issue of HTTP/2 is we have just moved the head of line (HOL)...


2

A series of HTTP/2 frames, belonging to the same stream or to different streams does not matter, it's just a series of bytes. TCP does not interpret those bytes. The TCP sender just packs the bytes into TCP frames and sends them along. The TCP receiver receives the TCP frames and reassembles the bytes that happen to form a series of HTTP/2 frames. TCP and ...


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I have struggled to understand the purpose of the WebSocket mask until I encountered the following two resources which summarize it clearly. From the book High Performance Browser Networking: The payload of all client-initiated frames is masked using the value specified in the frame header: this prevents malicious scripts executing on the client from ...


2

The solution is simply to use a look-up table based CRC. If you can't append the checksum (aka the Frame Check Sequence, FCS) to the package, then do the table look-up first and then simply compare that one against the expected sequence for your fixed data. Please note that "CRC 16" could mean anything, there are multiple versions and (non)standards. The ...


2

Can anyone explain to me how to work with this protocol? What is the form of HTTP packets? The specification might be helpful. Concerning the webz, you find a lot of specification on the RFCs. More to HTTP below. (Since you seem to be new to programming, I figured I might want to tell you the following:) Usually one doesn't directly interact with HTTP(S) ...


2

The website you link to is describing the data format. All data represented as a series of 1's and 0's. A byte is a series of 8 1's and 0's. However, just because you have a series of bytes doesn't mean you know how to interpret them. Do they represent a character? An integer? Can that integer be negative? All of that is defined by whoever crafted the data ...


2

The data you have shared is 17 bytes long. I've used this xml to get the fields. The first byte is flags and in your data that is decimal 27 which is binary 00011011 So the flags are set as follows: <Bit index="0" size="1" name="Carbohydrate ID And Carbohydrate Present"> = True <Bit index="1" size="1"...


2

Your issue is that you are re-encoding the image, and thus changing the file size. When you read the image ImageIO.read() it may lose metadata, then when you write it with ImageIO.write() it is not guaranteed to encode it byte for byte the exact same as it was initially encoded on disk. I'd recommend just copying the bytes directly from the file: File ...


1

The pcap header file defines the link type of the capture (Ethernet, Raw IP, ...) Before processing the packet, you shoud use datalink() of your dpkt.pcap.Reader() object to get the link type of your pcap file. According to your script example : if <<dpkt.pcap.Reader>>.datalink() == LINKTYPE_ETHERNET: ## Process Ethernet frame elif <<...


1

You are doing great, you have done right as you are trying to merge the username between the data and send it using socket. You have to use the little tweak, Because info and USERNAME are const size array you can not directly insert one into another, first create an array of the size of the length of both the arrays. Then, wherever you want just define the ...


1

Assuming buffer contains the Byte[]: var bufferPos = 0; do { // get size of next packet var packetSize = buffer[bufferPos]+buffer[bufferPos+1]*256; // get type of next packet var packetType = buffer[bufferPos+2]; var payload = new ArraySegment<Byte>(buffer, bufferPos+3, packetSize-3); // process packet here bufferPos += ...


1

Total TLS decoding As you've found, scapy doesn't decode the entire packet. But this is fine, because we can manually decode the TLS sections that scapy currently considers as a "Raw load" of bytes. >>> pkts = rdpcap("facebook.com.pcap") >>> extra_tls_layers = TLS(pkts[5]["TLS"].load) >>> # We can see that TLS is now decoded, ...


1

Why does the TCP header have a header length field while the UDP header does not? might be a valid question. UDP header contains the header+data length TCP header contains the header length in 32b DWORD IP header contains the total length of the IP packet Important: UDP header is fixed 8 Bytes => no meaning to make the header bigger for a constant TCP ...


1

To build a block of bytes for transmitting, I recommend using the built-in ByteBuffer, which e.g. has helpers for 16-, 32-, and 64-bit integers in big- or little-endian. You should then store the values as you use them, e.g. public byte frameId; public long addr64; public short addr16; public byte capability; byte[] getBytes() throws IOException { ...


1

Let's say that we are sniffing packets with scapy and want to look at the values inside. Much of this is a matter of using the scapy documentation to find what attributes each layer has. You can also do this in your python/scapy interpreter with dir(packet) to see what attributes and methods it has. For example: >>> dir(packet) ... 'show', 'show2'...


1

Scapy filters are from a type called BPF, you can see the syntax here. In your case, I think what you want to do is- filter='src host 8.8.8.8 and dst port 23' Your original syntax is not distinguishig between source and destination, so it will filter packets from/to ip 8.8.8.8 and from/to port 23.


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I have answer about this : Thanks alot to @jackw1111, your comment as clue : When working with raw sockets in scripts, most operating system require advanced privileges (e.g. root user) to run them. Send packet must in ascii : packet = b'\x1b\x02\xfa\x03\x1b\x03\xc8' s.send(packet) This article is helpfull https://inc0x0.com/tcp-ip-packets-introduction/...


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Is it OK to have another thread afterwards running and reading lines from the same file, do something with the data and then delete the line when processed - without this interfering with dumpcap? No. But this is the wrong approach. A pipe is actually what you should use here, i.e. dumpcap writing to a pipe and the analyzing process reading from it, i.e. ...


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Short answer: yes Longer answer: "packet capturing" doesn't interfere with the normal packet handling -- it just makes copies of the packets at a point where they pass through the kernel. The normal place for this to happen is between the device driver and the networking stack, but depending on how you have filtering set up, it can happen other places as ...


1

I've provided an answer over at https://ask.wireshark.org/question/14795/extract-specific-byte-offset-using-tshark/, but for convenience, I'll summarize the 2 possible solutions I provided here. In a nutshell: The highlighted byte in the image appears to be the TTL field of the IP header. If that's the field you're interested in, you can obtain it via: ...


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It sounds like the questions aims at helping you understand different transit times of data of different speed/length links. For A->B you should calculate how long the packet takes to transmit on a 4 megabit link. You then need to add the physical transit time, using the distance and the speed of light. I.e. first you need to know how long it takes until ...


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If you set the size to a negative value, the fields will be in low endian


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Use sprintf to write to a buffer in memory. Make that buffer as large as possible, and when it gets full, then use a single fwrite to dump the entire buffer to disk. Hopefully by that point it will contain many hundreds or thousands of lines of CSV data that will get written at once while you begin to fill up another in-memory buffer with more sprintf.


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Use the pcapng format. The spec should have everything you need if you want to look at header bytes at a deeper level. Pcap is the older format, but has limitations. There's already a pcapng parser available, pcap-ng-parser available via npm. If you want a general protocol analyzer, you should look at Wireshark Generate a pcapng file In order to work ...


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