New answers tagged

0

What does your polygon data look like? Do you have geometry fields? If so, you could use geopandas contains to check if your blue polygons contain your points.


2

If the index must be preserved: mask= pd.DataFrame(True,index=df.index,columns=df.columns) or mask= pd.DataFrame(True,index=df.index,columns=[df.columns[0]])


0

You only need loc + Series.isin: transdf.loc[transdf['Gym'].isin(testlist),'Gym']


0

Have you looked at the transpose function? https://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/reference/api/pandas.DataFrame.transpose.html


0

Those are both just normal lists, there is no "vertical" or "horizontal" list there. The only reason they are listed with a different orientation is because one has longer items. Also if amenities_dict['Gym'] already is a list, i.e. if the value for the key Gym is already a list, then you don't need to do list(amenities_dict['Gym'])


2

With Recursion def find_root(tree, child): if child in tree: return {p for x in tree[child] for p in find_root(tree, x)} else: return {child} tree = {} for parent, child in zip(df.parent, df.child): tree.setdefault(child, set()).add(parent) descendents = {} for child in tree: for parent in find_root(tree, child): ...


0

Another possible reason may be truncation: probably what you see as 51.487542 is the truncation of a value with more digits. You can verify this possibility printing the value of the cell containing it. Otherwise you may first run sales_data = sales_data.round(6) to round every element of the table to the 6th decimal number, and then try to replace.


0

Because your csv file does not contain /t (tab) between the names. I just replaced the spaces in each row with tabs and I ran your code which gave me following result: month number age name column1 0 1 'Pete Houston' 'Software Engineer' 92 NaN 1 2 'John Wick' 'Assassin' 95 NaN 2 ...


0

Strange it should work. The only explanation I see is that the Latidude column is not a float64 column. Try the following: sales_data['Latitude'] = sales_data['Latitude'].replace('51.487542', '40.740657') If this does not work please post the result of print(sales_data.dtypes) and maybe some sample data.


1

The following code works fine for your csv example: pd.read_csv("filename.csv", sep="\s+", quotechar="'", header=None, names=["a", "b", "c", "d"]) Instead of using "\t" as separator, better use "\s+", which is more versatile. Also, there's a mess with your quote parameters.


0

index.tz_localize('Europe/Berlin', ambiguous=np.array([True]*17)) I think some of your dst time needs to be inferred, but you have duplicate time index causing failure to infer, use optional np.array would work


0

The way you have stored your data, there is simply not enough information to infer which datetime value belongs to summer time and which to winter time. A naive approach would be to say you have ambiguous datetime values, and just set ambiguous=True instead of ambiguous='infer' on the last line: df.index = df.index.tz_localize('Europe/Berlin', ambiguous=...


3

I use numpy.ones for that: np.ones(df.shape[0], dtype=np.bool)


6

I suggest you use networkx, as this is a graph problem. In particular the descendants function: import networkx as nx import pandas as pd data = [['A', 'B', 0, 1], ['B', 'C', 1, 2], ['B', 'D', 1, 2], ['X', 'Y', 0, 2], ['X', 'D', 0, 2], ['Y', 'Z', 2, 3]] df = pd.DataFrame(data=data, columns=['parent', 'child', '...


-1

Please look around on stackoverflow and on the web in general. This sort of question has been asked so many times that I’ve answered variations of it 2 or 3 times in the past few days. Anyway, onto the code. df["C"] = "NO" df.loc[(df["B"] == 12) | (df["B"] == 13), "C"] = "YES" For what it's worth, this answer is about twice as fast as the one by @jezrael....


0

Your question is quite untrivial and as mentioned in the comments, it's probably best to use the difflib.Sequencematcher.get_matching_blocks for this, but I couldn get it to work. So here's a working solution, which will not perform in terms of speed, but get's the output. First we get the difference in words, then we find the starting + ending position in ...


0

Don't get it. Is this technique below new? The question doesn't say how you want to round. Rounding down would often be appropriate for a time function. This is not statistics. rounded_down_datetime = raw_datetime.replace(microsecond=0)


0

Aggregate you data first, then plot with the argument stacked=True pivot_table df.pivot_table('count', 'Year', 'Category', 'sum').plot.bar(stacked=True) groupby df.groupby(['Year', 'Category'])['count'].sum().unstack().plot.bar(stacked=True)


0

You say you are completely new, so I am not sure how far you have gotten with this. If you have imported both files into dataframes, then you need to rename your DateTime column in both dataframes to the same name. Then use an inner merge. df3 = pd.merge(df1, df2, on='DateTime', how='inner') df3 I used 'DateTime' as the column name. You will need to use ...


1

I think you need first test values by Series.isin and then in DataFrame.groupby with DataFrame.any and GroupBy.transform test if at least one True per rows: vals=[12, 13] df['C'] = np.where(df['B'].isin(vals).groupby(df['A']).transform('any'), 'YES', 'NO') print (df) A B C 0 aa 11 YES 1 aa 12 YES 2 aa 13 YES 3 ab 11 YES 4 ac 11 NO ...


0

As I understood from your df you are trying to calculate something like moving average metric. To do this you can simply use for iteration: for i in range(0, df.shape[0] - 2): df.loc[df.index[i + 2], 'AVG'] = np.round(((df.iloc[i, 1] + df.iloc[i + 1, 1] + df.iloc[i + 2, 1]) / 3), 1) Where in pd.loc clauses you specify the columns on which you want to ...


5

It seems you need skip first rows: data = pd.read_csv(path_input,sep='\t', skiprows=9) Or specify row for new header, e.g. 10th row: data = pd.read_csv(path_input,sep='\t', header=[10])


1

The most general solution is convert all values to strings, use join and last replace: df['new'] = df.astype(str).apply('_'.join, axis=1).str.replace(' ', '_') If need filter only some columns: cols = ['Category','Event','Cost'] df['new'] = df[cols].astype(str).apply('_'.join, axis=1).str.replace(' ', '_') Or processing each columns separately - if ...


1

You can use groupby and rolling df['Avg'] = df.groupby('Stock', as_index=False)['close'].rolling(3).mean().reset_index(0,drop=True) df Out[1]: Stock open high low close Avg 0 SBIN 255.85 256.00 255.80 255.90 NaN 1 HDFC 1222.25 1222.45 1220.45 1220.45 NaN 2 SBIN 255.95 255.95 255.85 ...


0

Use groupby.apply + Series.rolling: df['Avg']=df.groupby('Stock')['close'].apply(lambda x: x.rolling(3).mean()) print(df) Stock open high low close Avg 0 SBIN 255.85 256.00 255.80 255.90 NaN 1 HDFC 1222.25 1222.45 1220.45 1220.45 NaN 2 SBIN 255.95 255.95 255.85 255.85 NaN 3 ...


0

Use Series.apply + lambda function with list comprehension to the case there is more than one word per cell: df1['Column3']=df1['Column2'].apply(lambda x: [word for word in df2['DATA'] if word.upper() in x.upper()]) print(df1) Column1 Column2 Column3 0 546852 Lorem,ipsum,dolor,sit,amet [...


0

I was trying some of the solutions here but then I actually came up with my own one. I hope this might be useful for the next one so I share it here: def sort_correlation_matrix(correlation_matrix): cor = correlation_matrix.abs() top_col = cor[cor.columns[0]][1:] top_col = top_col.sort_values(ascending=False) ordered_columns = [cor.columns[0]...


1

If you want to get all possible occurencies you can use the following function. Keep in mind that you should deal with lowercase too. lst = [l.lower() for l in df2["DATA"].unique().to_list()] def fun(x): x = x["Column2"].lower() return [l.capitalize() for l in lst if l in x] df1["Column3"] = df1.apply(fun, axis=1)


0

def my_func(x): try: float(x) except ValueError: return False return True df['A'].apply(my_func) 0 True 1 True 2 False


2

Use pd.to_numeric with argument errors="coerce" and check which values come out not NaN: pd.to_numeric(df['A'],errors='coerce').notna() 0 True 1 True 2 False Name: A, dtype: bool If you want to use str.isnumeric, pandas does not automatically recognizes the . as a decimal, so we have to replace it: df['A'].str.replace('\.', '').str.isnumeric() ...


0

First use: import pandas as pd df1=pd.read_excel(file1) df2=pd.read_excel(file2) pd.to_datetime(df1['Time_Column_name'].str.strip(),format='%H:%M:%S') pd.to_datetime(df2['Time_Column_name'].str.strip(),format='%H:%M:%S') then merge the 2 dataframes using: pd.merge(df1,df2,how=inner) Please ask if you need further help and upvote if it helped you


0

Your result will be a Serie of DataFrames. In order to transform them in one DataFrame, you can do something like : pd.concat(ds_telemetry_pd.apply(apply_calc_coef, axis=1).tolist(), ignore_index=True)


1

This a way: def find_elements(row): for element in df2.Data.unique(): if row.Column2.str.contains(element): return element df3 = df1.copy() df3["Column3"] = df3.apply(find_elements, axis=1) That should work, of cource, you can find other way to do it. Edit : As mentioned by @vb_rises if several word are in the same sentence, the ...


0

I think better here is use to_datetime: df['Start Date'] = pd.to_datetime(df['Start Date'], dayfirst=True) Or: df['Start Date'] = pd.to_datetime(df['Start Date'], format="%d/%m/%Y") In your solution remove .date(): mask = df['Start Date'].apply(lambda x: isinstance(x, str)) df.loc[mask, 'Start Date'].apply(lambda y: datetime.strptime(y, "%d/%m/%Y"))


2

Use DataFrame.set_index + DataFrame.stack.Then rename the serie using Series.rename.Finally convert to dataframe using to_frame: df.set_index('Date').stack().rename('returns').to_frame() returns Date 20171017 MMM -0.004455 ABT 0.007810 ABBV 0.012260 ABMD 0.011132 20171018 MMM 0.002382 ...


3

Use DataFrame.set_index with DataFrame.stack for Series with MultiIndex and if necessary one column DataFrame add Series.to_frame: df = df.set_index('Date').stack().to_frame('Returns') print (df) Returns Date 20171017 MMM -0.004455 ABT 0.007810 ABBV 0.012260 ABMD 0.011132 20171018 MMM 0....


0

Use numpy.select with Series.apply for return mask by column values: df = pd.DataFrame({'date':['2019-10-1 01:00:10', '2019-10-2 14:00:10', '2019-10-31 19:00:10', '2019-10-31 06:00:10']}) df['time'] = pd.to_datetime(df['date']).dt.time print(df) date ...


0

This is how you can do it df = pd.DataFrame({'test': ['foo foo foo foo foo foo foo foo', 'bar bar bar bar bar'], 'number': [1, 2]}) df.style.set_properties(subset=['test'], **{'width': '300px'}) new_df=df.style.set_properties(subset=['testt'], **{'width': '300px'}) Render this and save to file html_df = new_df.hide_index().render() with ...


1

You can aslo use pd.date_range: df['date']=pd.to_datetime(df['date']) dates=pd.date_range(df['date'].min(),df['date'].max()) df.set_index(df['date'])['times'].reindex(index=dates).fillna(0).reset_index() index times 0 2019-10-01 4.0 1 2019-10-02 6.0 2 2019-10-03 0.0 3 2019-10-04 0.0 4 2019-10-05 0.0 5 2019-10-06 0.0 6 2019-...


0

I managed to fix it with the following solution, although I believe it can be done better: if len(df_output.columns): df_output = pd.concat([df_output, df_temp], axis=1).sort_index(level=0, axis=1) else: df_output = df_temp


3

Create DatetimeIndex first and for append missing datetimes use DataFrame.asfreq: df['date'] = pd.to_datetime(df['date']) df = df.set_index('date').asfreq('d', fill_value=0).reset_index() print (df) date times 0 2019-10-01 4 1 2019-10-02 6 2 2019-10-03 0 3 2019-10-04 0 4 2019-10-05 0 5 2019-10-06 0 ... ... 20 ...


0

First, convert the column you use as parameter inside your isin() method as a list. Then parse it as a copy of your df1 dataframe because you need to get the value counts at the same column you filtered. From your example: print(df1[df1['Col1'].isin(df2['col3'].values.tolist())]['Col1'].value_counts()) Try running that again.


0

It seems that your mistake was in tolist(). Try the following: import pandas as pd import json import re data = {"shipping_assignments":[{"shipping":{"address":{"address_type":"shipping","city":"Calder","country_id":"US","customer_address_id":1,"email":"roni_cost@example.com","entity_id":1,"firstname":"Veronica","lastname":"Costello","parent_id":1,"...


1

You can exploit .style properety, which provides high grain control over the looks of the resulting HTML. Some CSS knowledge is required, though: import pandas as pd import numpy as np df = pd.DataFrame({'A': np.linspace(1, 10, 10)}) df = pd.concat([df, pd.DataFrame(np.random.randn(10, 4), columns=list('BCDE'))], axis=1) styles = [dict(selector='.col3', ...


3

Use concat with DataFrame.sort_values and last replace missing values forward and back filling: df = pd.concat([df1, df2, df3], sort=True).sort_values('fix_col').ffill().bfill() print (df) col1 col2 col3 col4 col5 col6 fix_col 0 p q t u x r 1 0 p q t u x r 2 1 q e t u x r 4 0 q ...


3

Ummm, this question include three sub-questions q1 is use the cumsum create the group key then cumcount , q2 is cumsum , q3 is to get the max of each sub-group's position , so we transform max df['count']=df.groupby(df.part.eq('ok').cumsum()).cumcount()+1 df['concat']=df.groupby(df.part.eq('ok').cumsum()).content.apply(lambda x : x.cumsum()) df['take']=df['...


0

I think the easiest and fastest what you can do here is to merge (read: join) both dataframes on the deperature postcal code and arrival postal code. This way you get all the meters + seconds information in your order dataframe in one go. Code for test data provided: orders.merge(distance_chunks, left_on=['customer_address', '...


0

This is not much different from others solution set1 = set(df1["a"].tolist()) set2 = set(df2["a"].tolist()) inter = list(set1.intersection(set2)) df3 = pd.concat([df1[df1["a"].isin(inter)], df2[df2["a"].isin(inter)]], ignore_index=True)


3

Use: df3= pd.concat([df1, df2], ignore_index=True) df3 = df3[df3['a'].isin(np.intersect1d(df1['a'], df2['a']))] Or: idx = np.intersect1d(df1['a'], df2['a']) df3 = pd.concat([df1[df1.a.isin(idx)], df2[df2.a.isin(idx)]], ignore_index=True) print (df3) a b 1 2 555 2 4 555 3 4 555 4 5 555 0 2 666 1 2 666 3 4 666 4 5 666 5 2 666


1

Roughly, this will solve your issue: (pd.concat((df1[df1.a.isin(df2.a)], df2[df2.a.isin(df1.a)]), ignore_index=True) .sort_values('a')) # a b #0 2 555 #4 2 666 #5 2 666 #8 2 666 #1 4 555 #2 4 555 #6 4 666 #3 5 555 #7 5 666


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