3

You have to specify that $str can take value from pipeline (I also added Mandatory parameter here - it's not necessarily needed, but fits well into that specific script): param( [Parameter(Mandatory=$true, ValueFromPipeline=$true)] [string] $str ) echo $str Then you invoke that script and it should work (remember about .\ before file name): PS> ...


3

You can specify further attributes for the parameters in PowerShell, look at MS documentation about Parameter Attribute Declaration. In your case you should set the attribute valuefrompipeline to $true. Use this code for parameters you want to pass by pipeline. param( [parameter(ValueFromPipeline = $true)] [string]$str ) NOTE You can use ...


3

I found a way to do so, but instead of double-hyphen you have to pass 3 of them. This is a simple function, you can change the code as you want: function Test-Hyphen { param( ${-} ) if (${-}) { write-host "You used triple-hyphen" } else { write-host "You didn't use triple-hyphen" } } Sample 1 Test-Hyphen ...


3

Use this [System.Windows.Forms.DragDropEffects] instead of [System.Windows.DragDropEffects] in all the places you are using it..


1

You can call the install-module command with -ErrorAction Stop inside a try catch loop. try { #run with no credentials Install-Module -Name $ModuleName -Repository $RepositoryName -ErrorAction stop -WarningAction SilentlyContinue } catch { #when fails, run with proxy credentials Install-Module -Name $ModuleName -Repository $RepositoryName -...


1

The problem seems to be that Pester blocks filtering on common parameters, so your use of 'ErrorAction', etc is causing your filter to fail. You can see the parameters being removed from mocked functions at around line 232 in the Pester mock code: Mock.ps1 And also, testing for this removal is one of Pester's own unit tests (line 283): Mock.tests.ps1


1

As i mentioned in the comment, Powershell v5 supports using v1 commands in it. So this is a v1 code: $source = "C:\fso" $destination = "C:\fso1\FSO_Backup.zip" If(Test-path $destination) {Remove-item $destination} Add-Type -assembly "system.io.compression.filesystem" [io.compression.zipfile]::CreateFromDirectory($Source, $destination) Note ...


1

One alternative is to use .NET: function echo-env($var) { "value of '$var' is: $([Environment]::GetEnvironmentVariable($var))" }


1

Querying at the level of Cim instance is faster than that in PowerShell. In your code, you are getting the whole CimInstance related to SoftwareLicensingProduct and then filtering them all (using where-object) in Powershell, whereas you can use -filter parameter and filter at the level of CimInstance, which is faster. Try this: Get-CimInstance ...


1

Get-CimInstance has a -Filter parameter that accepts a WQL query filter: $SLP = Get-CimInstance SoftwareLicensingProduct -Filter 'Description LIKE "Windows%" AND LicenseStatus = 1' $SLP.Description -replace '.*(VOLUME_MAK|OEM_SLP|RETAIL|OEM_COA_NSLP|OEM_COA_SLP).*', '$1' This will likely be faster than having Get-CimInstance return all the instances and ...


1

After our chat I understand what you're trying to do. You want to write yourself a custom progress bar that both writes to a log file as well as to the console without line breaks in either. For that you can write a function that will accomplish it, but I do recommend picking a new name that doesn't conflict with an existing cmdlet. I'll use Write-MyProgress....


1

I'd use a switch statement to process each item depending on if it is a user or group, and then replace the MemberName property depending on what it is: $Results = Switch(Get-ADGroupMember -Identity $GroupGUID){ {$_.ObjectClass -eq 'User'} {$_ | Get-ADUser -Prop DisplayName | Select *,@{l='MemberName';e={$_.DisplayName}} -ExcludeProperty MemberName} ...


1

Unfortunately, there is no in-built tool with Windows 10 that will allow you to change the resolution automatically. I tried automating resolution using direct registry edits with PowerShell, but there are too many different possible keys responsible for it, depending on the type of graphics card you have. If you can find the exact registry keys ...


1

If you want to target .NET Standard, you should reference the PowerShellStandard.Library nuget package PowerShell Standard exposes only the API surface that overlaps between PowerShell 5.1 (.NET Framework) and PowerShell Core (.NET Core), so it'll work regardless of which edition you compile against. Recommended reading: PowerShell Standard Library: Build ...


1

Yes, you have to use the script block version of where-object. Also note that -and and -or have EQUAL PRECEDENCE in powershell, which is very unusual in a language.


1

For your issue, you just need to change the command like below: $Nic | Set-AzureRmNetworkInterface Then it will work without the error. But as I see in your script, you just get the network interface then set it without any change. If so, the command does not affect anything. You can take a look at the example of the command Set-AzureRmNetworkInterface.


1

This will be corrected when PowerShell 6.2 is installed. Install powershell 6.2 from doc and configure in Visual Studio code as follow.


1

There is a possibility that Octopus master/tentacle service runs on different user, check the environment variable for that user also. If you unable to find the root cause, the alternate is define one Target scoped variable called "npmPath" ( value may be different based on target ) in octopus to store npm path Now, you can use $npmPath variable in script.


1

It is available in the Microsoft official docs, Creates an Azure Web App using RM module New-AzureRmWebApp [[-ResourceGroupName] <String>] [-Name] <String> [[-Location] <String>] [[-AppServicePlan] <String>] [-ContainerImageName <String>] [-EnableContainerContinuousDeployment] [-AsJob] [-...


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