8

To check whether a parameter was either passed in by the caller or not, inspect the $PSBoundParameters automatic variable: if($PSBoundParameters.ContainsKey('AddHash')) { # switch parameter was explicitly passed by the caller # grab its value $requestparams.Code = $AddHash.IsPresent } else { # parameter was absent from the invocation, don't ...


8

% In your case, it is the modulus operator. It will return the remainder of dividing the left-hand side value by the right-hand side value. It defaults as a PowerShell alias for Foreach-Object. You can execute the Get-Alias command to see other potential aliases that may contain special characters like Where-Object's alias ?. $_ Synonymous with $PSItem ...


7

String.Split() doesn't "know" that you're only interested in a particular subset of the result and only want the string split in 2 places. Use the -split operator and specify a max number of resulting substrings: $rest = ($buildParametersSourceBranch -split '/',3)[2] # or $null,$null,$rest = $buildParametersSourceBranch -split '/',3


7

By default, cmdlets throw non-script-terminating errors which a try/catch does not handle. You can change this behavior by using the $ErrorActionPreference automatic variable, or the -ErrorAction common parameter: # or `$ErrorActionPreference = 'Stop'` foreach ($s in $servers) { try { Test-Connection -TargetName $s.server -Count 1 -ErrorAction ...


7

I don't even know what these special [] and :: are called in .Net\PowerShell [...] delimits a type literal; e.g. [MVPSI.JAMS.CredentialRights] :: accesses a type's static members. Note that both of these syntax forms are specific to PowerShell. The alternative to using a type literal is to cast a type name (string) to [type]: # The type name as a string. ...


6

Edit: This issue has been reported on the PowerShell GitHub repository. It appears to be a bug in the command. The header in the CSV file can't begin with an #. Note that converting the first header to "#" instead of # also doesn't fix the issue. As a workaround: $data = Get-Content "C:\C Drives Less than 10GB free.csv" $data[0] = 'Num' + $data[0] $data | ...


6

Note: The problem is ultimately that in Windows PowerShell different cmdlets / operators use different default encodings. This problem has been resolved in PowerShell Core, where BOM-less UTF-8 is consistently used. >> blindly applies Out-File's default encoding when appending to an existing file (in effect, > behaves like Out-File and >> ...


6

Use the unary form of ,, PowerShell's array-construction operator: "a:b;c:d;e:f".Split(";") | ForEach-Object { , $_.Split(":") } That way, the array returned by $_.Split(":") is effectively output as-is, as an array, instead of having its elements output one by one, which happens by default in a PowerShell pipeline. , effectively creates a - transient - ...


6

By adding a [Parameter()] attribute decorator and specifying the Mandatory property: param( [Parameter(Mandatory = $true)] [string]$ReferenceDomain ) Please see the about_Functions_Advanced_Parameters help topic for more on the Parameter attribute and Mandatory


5

Reference items in the $args array directly. You don't need that param($args) statement at top of the script. Simplified example... $things = @(1, 2, 3); $script = { Write-Host $args[0] Write-Host $args[1] } foreach ($thing in $things) { Start-Job -ScriptBlock $script -ArgumentList $thing, ($thing * 3) -Name "Job-${thing}" } Receive-Job -Name ...


5

To instantiate an empty array in the expression of the calculated property, @() is not enough, because PowerShell will flatten that and it will become $null. Use ,@() instead $Test = @( [PSCustomObject]@{ Name = 'Test' } [PSCustomObject]@{ Name = 'Test2' } ) | Select-Object -Property @{N = 'Problem'; E = { ,@() } }, ...


5

Loop over the arguments: foreach($group in 'NA\admin','NA\dev'){ try { Grant-SmbShareAccess -Name [FolderName] -AccountName $group -AccessRight Read -Force } catch { Write-Host "Failed to grant permission to: $group" } }


5

The reason you cannot just use $count++ in your script block in order to increment the sequence number directly is: Delay-bind script blocks - such as the one you passed to Rename-Item -NewName - and script blocks in calculated properties run in a child scope. Contrast this with script blocks passed to Where-Object and ForEach-Object, which run directly in ...


5

I'm not sure how to handle your problem, but perhaps I can still help you with this: In PowerShell starting from 3.0 you have a cmdlet called Send-MailMessage. Send-MailMessage -From 'jesfer <jesfer@gmail.com>' -To 'tesrere<tesrere@gmail.com>' -Subject "first letter" -Body "Text of the letter" -SmtpServer "smtp.gmail.com" -UseSsl Regarding the ...


5

You need to escape $ since it has a special meaning in a regular expression (end of text). (Get-Content C:\Users\user\Desktop\test\import.txt) | Foreach-Object {$_ -replace '"'}| Foreach-Object {$_ -replace "\$", ';$'} | Set-Content C:\Users\user\Desktop\test\export.txt


4

Iterate over the objects instead of just one property. foreach ($acl in $ACLFile) { $id = $acl.Account $access = $acl.AccessRights # ... }


4

When a cmdlet outputs something on the pipeline, the pipeline is executed before the next output of the cmdlet is processed. So as your string works its way down the pipeline to Set-Content, Get-Content is still active (with the output file open) waiting for its turn to continue execution. However, when you wrap the expression in (), all the output is ...


4

These commands are not doing what you think they're doing. Rather than executing two commands, you are asking your interpreter to evaluate two statements based on the output of the commands you have in parenthesis. In Powershell, parenthesis are used to denote a statement that is executed first. Start-Sleep will return $NULL upon return because nothing was ...


4

Because the $userShare variable contains characters that have special meaning in Regular Expressions (and -replace uses Regex), you need to [Regex]::Escape() that string. First thing to notice is that you start the UNC paths with three backslashes, where you should only have two. Next is that your $results variable is simply declared as string and should ...


4

Since $input is an automatic/reserved variable, your code will not execute as intended. $input will likely result in an empty value during retrieval. If we theoretically assume that $input is replaced by something that is not reserved, then a corresponding issue here is $input is a string and $totaloptions is an int. When PowerShell is faced with a ...


4

using assembly System.Windows.Forms using namespace System.Windows.Forms [messagebox]::show('hello world')


4

You found the source of the problem - your AHK is 32-bit and therefore runs the 32-bit PowerShell executable, while your terminal (console window) runs the 64-bit executable - but let me add some background information. In Windows PowerShell (unlike in PowerShell Core) the execution policies are stored in the registry, namely at: LocalMachine scope: ...


4

when you install chocolatey, it puts a few lines of code in your powershell profile that load the various extensions & functions. [grin] you can find the various profiles here ... $Profile | Select-Object -Property * you can find the choco files here ... Get-ChildItem -Path env:\choc* for me, the loader is here ... C:\ProgramData\...


4

To access the property with 'special characters' in its name, enclose the parameter name inside quotes like so: $buildInformation.parameters.'system.pullRequest.sourceBranch' NOTE: The trick here is that the value of parameters is inside double quotes. Therefore you might not be able to access the properties under parameters the usual way. To workaround it,...


4

Checking for "false" literally looks for the word false. In Powershell you need to check against $false as per the updated code below: $user1 = $env:USERNAME $u = Import-Csv C:\Users\$user1\Documents\ServiceAccts.csv | ForEach-Object{ Get-ADUser $_.User -Properties *} #Run write-output to display AD info #write-output $u if ($u.LockedOut ...


4

git diff [cid]..[cid] --name-status outputs lines of tab-separated values, so splitting on a normal space won't help you: $changes = git diff HEAD~ HEAD --name-status |ForEach-Object { # split on tab "`t" $change,$orig,$new = $_ -split "`t" [pscustomobject]@{ Change = $change Original = $orig Current = $new } }


4

Unfortunately, the verbose stream (stream number 4) isn't just silent when not explicitly turned on, but no data is written to it. That is, Write-Verbose statements are effective no-ops[1], unless -Verbose is passed or preference variable $VerbosePreference is set to Continue. Among PowerShell's silent-by-default output streams - verbose (4), debug (5) and ...


4

Add the -Wait parameter to you Start-Process call. From Start-Process: -Wait Indicates that this cmdlet waits for the specified process and its descendants to complete before accepting more input. This parameter suppresses the command prompt or retains the window until the processes finish. Otherwise, PowerShell fires up the process and moves on the ...


4

First, you don't have to use Foreach-Object here because the pipeline will directly unwrap $items and send one value at a time to your function processItem. Passing Arrays to Pipeline If a function returns more than one value, PowerShell wraps them in an array. However, if you pass the results to another function inside a pipeline, the pipeline ...


4

PowerShell allows you to specify property names as expressions, which is what you successfully used in $object.$test: the value of variable $test served as the property name. However, depending on the complexity of the expression, you may need (...) to delineate it: Therefore, you must use $object.($_.Key) rather than $object.$_.Key - the latter would be ...


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