8

When creating a list using *, you are just copying the reference to the object and not the instance itself. Short example: >>> a = [["abv"]] * 3 >>> a [['abv'], ['abv'], ['abv']] >>> a[0].append(1) >>> a [['abv', 1], ['abv', 1], ['abv', 1]] I'm creating a list which contains the object ["abv"] 3 times. It's all the same ...


7

Expanding on my comment. Here is something something quick to illustrate how you could use a function for this. This may not be the only way to do it, and there may be something better, but you can start with something like this. def set_line_colour(counter): line_colours = [line_col_red] * 4 #makes a list of 4 "Reds" if counter != 0: #or more ...


4

Comprehensions (list, set, dict, and generator expressions) all work on the principle of handling single items. A function that produces two key-value pairs is not a single item, so you need to split the result into single items. Comprehensions do not support PEP 448 unpacking syntax, those only apply to the non-comprehension forms. You'd have to add an ...


4

The function poor() is being called in the last line of your module tests. This gets executed when you do the import. If you remove that last line, it will work as desired. For testing purposes it is often convenient to have the function in the end like this if __name__ == '__main__': poor() That way, if you execute tests.py from the cli, poor() gets ...


4

When the in operator is applied to a list like you have here it looks for an exact match in the list. Your code is returning false because 'apple' isn't in the list, 'apple, iphone' is. To check each element in the list for the substring 'apple' you could use list comprehension. Something like: x = ['apple, iphone','samsung, galaxy','oneplus, 10pro'] print(...


4

To answer this question, you would need to modify your code a little bit. #to old rows append 0 below for j in range(0, len(row)): row[j].append(0) row = row + [[0]] * (i - len(row)) You need to modify it to remove the multiple reference on the same object. #to old rows append 0 below for j in range(0, len(row)): row[j].append(0) row += [[0] ...


3

Simplest vectorized way would be with np.setdiff1d + np.random.choice - c = np.setdiff1d(np.arange(a,b),arr) out = np.random.choice(c,n) Another way with masking - mask = np.ones(b-a,dtype=bool) mask[arr-a] = 0 idx = np.flatnonzero(mask)+a out = idx[np.random.randint(0,len(idx),n)]


3

You can use re.sub >>> mystr = "abcd (Read the tnc below!)" >>> >>> import re >>> re.sub(r'\C.*', '', mystr) 'abcd ' To remove everything between parenthesis >>> mystr = "abcd (Read the tnc below!)" >>> re.sub(r'\(.*?\)', '', mystr) 'abcd '


3

You can try something like: import numpy as np M = x[np.arange(0,ind.shape[0])[:, None, None], ind] where [:, None, None] is needed to broadcast np.arange(0,ind.shape[0]) to the correct dimensions for indexing the array x. As a test, you can generate the array M with your current method, then use the above method to generate an array M_, and confirm that (...


3

You can't add to a list like that. You'll want to use email_list.append(i) Python does this because you can do mathematical operations on list and do fun things, e.g. l = [] l = 5 * [2] l [2, 2, 2, 2, 2]


3

Use zip() Ex. cars = { 'cars' : ['audi', 'bmw', 'xyz'], 'model' : ['abc', 'qwer', 'rty'] } result = [{'cars':c,'car_model':m} for c,m in zip(cars['cars'],cars['model']) ] print(result) O/P: [{'cars': 'audi', 'car_model': 'abc'}, {'cars': 'bmw', 'car_model': 'qwer'}, {'cars': 'xyz', 'car_model': 'rty'}]


3

You have to replace commas with newlines \n and use split to get a list: dog_n = open('dognames.txt', "r").read().replace(",", "\n").split('\n') Output: ['chihuahua', 'japanese spaniel', 'maltese dog', ' maltese terrier', ' maltese'] Edit: If you are willing to close file then use: with open('dognames.txt', "r") as f: dog_n = f.read().replace(",", "...


3

According to [Python-Requests.2]: Developer Interface - class requests.Response.content (emphasis is mine): Content of the response, in bytes. On the other hand, [Python 3.Docs]: gzip.open(filename, mode='rb', compresslevel=9, encoding=None, errors=None, newline=None): The filename argument can be an actual filename (a str or bytes object), or an ...


3

When you slice a list, you actually create a copy of the list (the part you sliced) so they can't affect each other: x = [1, 2, 3, 4] y = x[1:] # y = [2, 3, 4] y[0] = "hi" # y = ["hi", 3, 4] # y is a copy of x, so any changes made to y aren't reflected in x print(x) # [1, 2, 3, 4] The index assignment operator can work with one index (i.e x[i] = ...


3

You could try something like: from ast import literal_eval for i, v in dictionary.items(): try: dictionary[i] = literal_eval(v) except ValueError: pass From the documentation: ast.literal_eval(node_or_string) Safely evaluate an expression node or a Unicode or Latin-1 encoded string containing a Python literal or container ...


3

From the information given it is hard to know. I would guess that perhaps you have c:\ instead of c:/ in that path and that the \ end up as an invalid escape character. Try using \\ in the path, or replacing it with a forward slash. I can't test this myself though since I'm on Linux.


3

Two main things : Use elif instead of multiple if if they are exclusive. If some code is repeated, use a function to respect the DRY principle. You could also (but not necessary) use a 'custom' switch-case in python


3

It seems you forgot to commit the transaction. If you start a transaction in a relational database, all data modifications are not persistent until you end the transaction. There are two ways to end a transaction: COMMIT makes the changes persistent ROLLBACK undoes all changes from the transaction as if it never happened If you terminate the database ...


3

Simply with str.rfind function (returns the highest index in the string where substring is found): s = 'foo-bar-123-7-foo2' res = s[s.rfind('-') + 1:] print(res) # foo2


2

Using itertools.groupby (doc): a = ['a','b','b','b','c','c','d','e','e'] from itertools import groupby last_index = 0 out = [] for v, g in groupby(enumerate(a), lambda k: k[1]): l = [*g] out.append([last_index, l[-1][0]]) last_index += len(l) print(out) Prints: [[0, 0], [1, 3], [4, 5], [6, 6], [7, 8]]


2

.read() returns a byte-string as the error suggests. Use decode to get an str object: info = strurl.read().decode()


2

I would do something like: mystr.split("(")[0]


2

IIUC, You need to se %b-%y as Apr is %b and 12 is %y. Refer to Python's strftime directives for more information. Once you convert to datetime objects, you can then convert them to UNIX. df: col 0 Apr-12 1 Apr-12 For int datetime, pd.Series(pd.to_datetime(df['col'], format='%b-%y').values.astype(float)).div(10**9) Output: 0 1.333238e+09 1 1....


2

Here's the solution I came up with a = [ 1, 2, 3, 4, [ 5, 6, 7, 8]] b = [10, 20, 30, 40, [50, 60, 70, 80]] def element_wise(a, b, f): return [element_wise(i, j, f) if type(i) == list and type(j) == list else f(i, j) for i, j in zip(a, b)] c = element_wise(a, b, lambda x, y: x + y) # [11, 22, 33, 44, [55, 66, 77, 88]] so a and b are your lists, ...


2

Using a sleep is not a good idea in this sort of situation, since it slows the whole thread (which is the entire program in a single-thread model). It's better to keep some kind of state information about the line, and based on real-time timings (e.g.: elapsed milliseconds) progress the "growth" of the line, second by second. This means the line needs to ...


2

The reason this happens is because the slice a[1:] is an entirely separate list from the original a. While this is only a shallow copy, since the objects you are storing in the list are immutable values, the shallow copy copies them by value rather than by reference. Therefore, when you update the object in the sliced list, the change is not reflected in the ...


2

This is one approach using collections.defaultdict. Ex: from collections import defaultdict theList = [ [[3, 5], [1, 1], [2, 3]], [[1, 2], [3, 5], [3, 0], [2, 3], [4, 2]], [[1, 2], [3, 5], [3, 0], [2, 3], [4, 2]], [[1, 2], [1, 1], [4, 2]] ] result = [] for i in theList: r = defaultdict(int) for j, k in i: r[j] += k ...


2

If need map by strings and first 3 letters create 2 separate Series and then use Series.fillna or Series.combine_first for replace missing values from a by b: s = mapp.set_index('variable')['concept_id'] a = data['sourcevalue'].map(s) b = data['sourcevalue'].str[:3].map(s) data['concept_id'] = a.fillna(b) #alternative #data['concept_id'] = a.combine_first(...


2

Using the fuzzy_merge function I wrote: new = fuzzy_merge(data, mapp, 'sourcevalue', 'variable')\ .merge(mapp, left_on='matches', right_on='variable')\ .drop(columns=['matches', 'variable']) Output sourcevalue concept_id 0 d22heartabcd 1 1 Studyid 2 2 noofsons 3 3 Level 4 4 ...


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