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11

^ is the bitwise XOR operator. You probably meant ** for exponentiation.


6

In Python the ^ operator is bitwise exclusive-or - not exponentiation. Use ** for exponentiation.


6

Using re.split(): import re meetingStrings = [ "appointment", "meet", "interview" ] text = "Fix me a meeting in 2 days" print(re.split('|'.join(r'(?:\b\w*'+re.escape(w)+r'\w*\b)' for w in meetingStrings), text, 1)[-1]) Prints: in 2 days


6

It is basically a design choice of Python, and there is not really something right or wrong with either an error for x[100:101] versus giving an empty list. Note that x[slice(...)] will always return a container (with the same type of x), while x[int] will always access the element at the specified position.


6

Use startswith instead. result_list = [ '0 instances of 44 bpm', '0 instances of 45 bpm', '10 instances of 46 bpm', '22 instances of 47 bpm', '354 instances of 65 bpm', '20 instances of 145 bpm' ] strip_zero = [x for x in result_list if not x.startswith('0 instances')] print(strip_zero)


6

You can use cv2.pointPolygonTest() to determine if your point exists inside a ROI. Essentially you can check if a point is within a contour. The function returns +1, -1, or 0 to indicate if a point is inside, outside, or on the contour, respectively. Since you already have the ROI coordinates, you can use that as the contour to detect if the point is ...


6

To answer your question why: the IEEE spec (IEEE 754) for floating point numbers, which is how numpy defines NaN is not equal to anything including itself. Numpy is respecting this, which is why np.nan == np.nan is false. People complain about this, but it's a hard choice to make because NaN can arise from things that are not equal. For example, should ...


5

You can use itertools.zip_longest (doc): big_list = [['this', 'is', 'a list'], ['list', 'two'], ['here', 'is', 'another one']] from itertools import zip_longest new_list = [value[2] for value in zip(*zip_longest(*big_list, fillvalue='dummy variable'))] print(new_list) Prints: ['a list', 'dummy variable', 'another one']


5

ULRs are more complicated than one might think which is why it's generally a good idea to use proven code to parse them and handle unexpected edge cases. Python has urllib.parse in the library, which you should use rather than trying to parse this your self. The parts you want are in the scheme, hostname, and port properties of the object returned from ...


5

The convention is as follows, it is x,y,w,h as you said, x,y are the coordinates for the top left corner of the box, and w,h are just the width and height, that's it, and similarily the origin of the image is from the top left, not bottom left, as specified by your drawing Here is a diagram to better illustrate this


5

you can get that for free using functools.lru_cache: from functools import lru_cache @lru_cache(maxsize=512) def get_ids(id, name, salary): id, name, salary = load_ids(id, name, salary) return id, name, salary


4

The problem is in your line newStr += letter. That adds the new letter to the right end of newStr, but you want to add it to the left side. So change that line to newStr = letter + newStr. You also should avoid using str as a variable name, so I changed it to oldstr. Your new code is then oldstr = "pizza" def letterReverse(word): newStr = "" for ...


4

They do different things. == tests for equality: "tomato" == "tomato" # true "potato" == "tomato" # false "mat" == "tomato" # false in tests for substring, and can be considered a (probably) more efficient version of str.find() != -1): "tomato" in "tomato" # true "potato" in "tomato" # false "mat" in "tomato" # true <-- this is different ...


4

If you want to keep the temporary file after it is closed, you need to pass delete=False. From the documentation of tempfile.NamedTemporaryFile that you linked: If delete is true (the default), the file is deleted as soon as it is closed. You would then just do: import csv import tempfile def write_csv(csvfile): writer = csv.DictWriter(csvfile, ...


4

You just need split the columns and re-create the dataframe df=pd.DataFrame(my_series.Column.str.split(';').sum(),columns=['columns']) df columns 0 A01.001 - Apple 1 R02.049 - Banana 2 B32:111 - Candy 3 C30.086 - Deer 4 V83.038 - Ears 5 U23.133 - Race Car 6 H14.200 - Silver 7 B32.111 - Candy


4

Use list comprehension with any: word = ['hello', 'how', 'are', 'you', 'potato'] letters = ['ell', 'how', 'aaa', 'bbb', 'tat'] def check_match(): return [any(x in i for x in letters) for i in word] print(check_match()) Output: [True, True, False, False, True]


4

Use Series.fillna for replace missing values by df1['address3']: df1['key'] = df1['address1'] + df1['address2'].fillna(df1['address3']) instead: df1['key'] = (df1['address1'] + (df1['address2'] if pd.notnull(df1['address2']) else df1['address3'])) More information about you error is in using if truth statements with-...


3

Here is a simpler way to do it import matplotlib.pyplot as plt from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d.art3d import Poly3DCollection triangles = [ ((1,1,1),(2,2,2),(1,3,4)), ((2,3,4),(9,9,9),(3,4,5)), ] ax = plt.gca(projection="3d") ax.add_collection(Poly3DCollection(triangles)) ax.set_xlim([0,10]) ax.set_ylim([0,10]) ax....


3

I'm not sure I understand completely, but you seem to make duplicated replacements with more calls to .replace() than necessary. Here is a simplified version of your code: import csv with open('demo.csv') as in_file, open('out.csv', 'w', newline='') as out_file: reader = csv.DictReader(in_file) writer = csv.DictWriter(out_file, fieldnames=reader....


3

Use map with df.index: df['days_in_month'] = df.index.map(lambda val: calendar.monthrange(val.year, val.month)[1])


3

I help maintain a page on the libvips wiki comparing 20 or so common image processing libraries for speed and memory use, including quite a few Python systems. https://github.com/libvips/libvips/wiki/Speed-and-memory-use The benchmark is very simple: load a 5,000 x 5,000 pixel RGB TIFF, crop 100 pixels from each edge, shrink 10%, sharpen with a 3x3 ...


3

You could define a list of tuples from both columns in the dataframe, and use each value to index the input dictionary and inner lists: d_ = tuple(zip(df['A'], df['C'])) # (('a', 0), ('b', 1), ('a', 1), ('c', 0), ('b', 2)) df['D'] = [d[a][c] for a,c in d_] A B C D 1 a ` 0 apple 2 b @ 1 baby 3 a # 1 append 4 c ¥ 0 cow 5 b %...


3

Can this c++ code be optimized further from coding or any other perspective? I can see at least three optimisations. The first two are easy and should definitely be done but in my testing they end up not impacting the runtime measurably. The third one requires rethinking the code minimally. edist caculates a costly square root, but you are only using the ...


3

I found using numpy to do this is more performant Without seeing the data you're working with I generate a random binary image import numpy as np mask = np.random.randint(0, 2, size=(360, 640, 1)) color_mask = np.array([50,50,50]) * mask + np.array([0,0,0]) * (1 - mask) # you do not need the second half of this statement if you're setting to all zeros ...


3

Pandas .div obviously implement division similarly to / and /=. The main reason to have a separate .div is that Pandas embraces a syntax model where operations on dataframes are described by the applications of consecutive filters, e.g. .div, .str, etc. which allows for simple concatenations: ser.div(7).apply(lambda x: 'text: ' + str(x)).str.upper() as ...


3

Python is rather more flexible than most languages. Class definitions don't impose any particular structure; they just provide a mechanism for method calls, inheritance, etc. You need to define an appropriate __init__ method to abstract the details of how an object should "look". class MyClass: def __init__(self, x, y): self.x = x self.y ...


3

You can use re.sub(): import re data = '''8/1 text1 1/5 text2 9/2 4/9 text1 3/1 text2 9/2''' def format_fraction(a, b): s = '{:.3g}'.format(float(a) / float(b) + 1) if '.' not in s: return s + '.0' return s s = re.sub(r'\b(\d+)/(\d+)\b', lambda g: format_fraction(g.group(1), g.group(2)) , data) print(s) Prints: 9.0 text1 1.2 text2 5....


3

By default, at startup Python adds the user site-packages dir (I'm going to refer to it as USPD) in the module search paths. But this only happens if the directory exists on the file system (disk). I didn't find any official documentation to support this statement 1, so I spent some time debugging and wondering why things seem to be so weird. The above ...


3

You can do this with a slice: rows[0][43:53] = [0 for i in range(10)]


3

Excel assumes Windows encoding when opening a .csv file. This encoding is depending on the language/country, but in english and west europe countries it is cp-1252 and it is very similar to ISO-8859-1 (also known as "latin1"). This encoding uses a single byte per character. This means that it allows for 256 different characters at maximum (in fact, they are ...


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