Hot answers tagged

5325

How can I merge two Python dictionaries in a single expression? For dictionaries x and y, z becomes a shallowly merged dictionary with values from y replacing those from x. In Python 3.5 or greater: z = {**x, **y} In Python 2, (or 3.4 or lower) write a function: def merge_two_dicts(x, y): z = x.copy() # start with x's keys and values z.update(...


3388

To select rows whose column value equals a scalar, some_value, use ==: df.loc[df['column_name'] == some_value] To select rows whose column value is in an iterable, some_values, use isin: df.loc[df['column_name'].isin(some_values)] Combine multiple conditions with &: df.loc[(df['column_name'] >= A) & (df['column_name'] <= B)] Note the ...


3234

easy_install pip If you need admin privileges to run this, try: sudo easy_install pip UPDATE (Jan 2019): easy_install has been deprecated. Please use get-pip.py instead.


2787

How do I manually throw/raise an exception in Python? Use the most specific Exception constructor that semantically fits your issue. Be specific in your message, e.g.: raise ValueError('A very specific bad thing happened.') Don't raise generic exceptions Avoid raising a generic Exception. To catch it, you'll have to catch all other more specific ...


2658

RENAME SPECIFIC COLUMNS Use the df.rename() function and refer the columns to be renamed. Not all the columns have to be renamed: df = df.rename(columns={'oldName1': 'newName1', 'oldName2': 'newName2'}) # Or rename the existing DataFrame (rather than creating a copy) df.rename(columns={'oldName1': 'newName1', 'oldName2': 'newName2'}, inplace=True) ...


2649

To delete a key regardless of whether it is in the dictionary, use the two-argument form of dict.pop(): my_dict.pop('key', None) This will return my_dict[key] if key exists in the dictionary, and None otherwise. If the second parameter is not specified (ie. my_dict.pop('key')) and key does not exist, a KeyError is raised. To delete a key that is ...


2551

Though classmethod and staticmethod are quite similar, there's a slight difference in usage for both entities: classmethod must have a reference to a class object as the first parameter, whereas staticmethod can have no parameters at all. Example class Date(object): def __init__(self, day=0, month=0, year=0): self.day = day self.month =...


2333

DataFrame.iterrows is a generator which yield both index and row import pandas as pd import numpy as np df = pd.DataFrame([{'c1':10, 'c2':100}, {'c1':11,'c2':110}, {'c1':12,'c2':120}]) for index, row in df.iterrows(): print(row['c1'], row['c2']) Output: 10 100 11 110 12 120


2093

Are you talking about multi-line strings? Easy, use triple quotes to start and end them. s = """ this is a very long string if I had the energy to type more and more ...""" You can use single quotes too (3 of them of course at start and end) and treat the resulting string s just like any other string. NOTE: Just as with any string, ...


2077

Looks like you haven't properly installed the header files and static libraries for python dev. Use your package manager to install them system-wide. For apt (Ubuntu, Debian...): sudo apt-get install python-dev # for python2.x installs sudo apt-get install python3-dev # for python3.x installs For yum (CentOS, RHEL...): sudo yum install python-devel ...


2045

The Python 3 range() object doesn't produce numbers immediately; it is a smart sequence object that produces numbers on demand. All it contains is your start, stop and step values, then as you iterate over the object the next integer is calculated each iteration. The object also implements the object.__contains__ hook, and calculates if your number is part ...


2016

The best way to do this in pandas is to use drop: df = df.drop('column_name', 1) where 1 is the axis number (0 for rows and 1 for columns.) To delete the column without having to reassign df you can do: df.drop('column_name', axis=1, inplace=True) Finally, to drop by column number instead of by column label, try this to delete, e.g. the 1st, 2nd and 4th ...


1979

Empty strings are "falsy" which means they are considered false in a Boolean context, so you can just do this: if not myString: This is the preferred way if you know that your variable is a string. If your variable could also be some other type then you should use myString == "". See the documentation on Truth Value Testing for other values that are ...


1917

You forgot the actual JSON part - data is a dictionary and not yet JSON-encoded. Write it like this for maximum compatibility (Python 2 and 3): import json with open('data.json', 'w') as f: json.dump(data, f) On a modern system (i.e. Python 3 and UTF-8 support), you can write a nicer file with import json with open('data.json', 'w', encoding='utf-8') ...


1808

Python 2.7.9+ and 3.4+ Good news! Python 3.4 (released March 2014) and Python 2.7.9 (released December 2014) ship with Pip. This is the best feature of any Python release. It makes the community's wealth of libraries accessible to everyone. Newbies are no longer excluded from using community libraries by the prohibitive difficulty of setup. In shipping with ...


1713

Just assign it to the .columns attribute: >>> df = pd.DataFrame({'$a':[1,2], '$b': [10,20]}) >>> df.columns = ['a', 'b'] >>> df a b 0 1 10 1 2 20


1669

You're looking for os.path.isdir, or os.path.exists if you don't care whether it's a file or a directory. Example: import os print(os.path.isdir("/home/el")) print(os.path.exists("/home/el/myfile.txt"))


1667

Locale unaware '{:,}'.format(value) # For Python ≥2.7 f'{value:,}' # For Python ≥3.6 Locale aware import locale locale.setlocale(locale.LC_ALL, '') # Use '' for auto, or force e.g. to 'en_US.UTF-8' '{:n}'.format(value) # For Python ≥2.7 f'{value:n}' # For Python ≥3.6 Reference Per Format Specification Mini-Language, The ',' option signals the ...


1620

The column names (which are strings) cannot be sliced in the manner you tried. Here you have a couple of options. If you know from context which variables you want to slice out, you can just return a view of only those columns by passing a list into the __getitem__ syntax (the []'s). df1 = df[['a','b']] Alternatively, if it matters to index them ...


1601

By default, cin is synchronized with stdio, which causes it to avoid any input buffering. If you add this to the top of your main, you should see much better performance: std::ios_base::sync_with_stdio(false); Normally, when an input stream is buffered, instead of reading one character at a time, the stream will be read in larger chunks. This reduces the ...


1572

You can get the values as a list by doing: list(my_dataframe.columns.values) Also you can simply use: (as shown in Ed Chum's answer): list(my_dataframe)


1560

The json module already implements some basic pretty printing with the indent parameter: >>> import json >>> >>> your_json = '["foo", {"bar":["baz", null, 1.0, 2]}]' >>> parsed = json.loads(your_json) >>> print(json.dumps(parsed, indent=4, sort_keys=True)) [ "foo", { "bar": [ "baz", ...


1388

Since this question was asked in 2010, there has been real simplification in how to do simple multithreading with Python with map and pool. The code below comes from an article/blog post that you should definitely check out (no affiliation) - Parallelism in one line: A Better Model for Day to Day Threading Tasks. I'll summarize below - it ends up being just ...


1365

While the question has been answered, I'd like to add some useful tips when using matplotlib.pyplot.savefig. The file format can be specified by the extension: from matplotlib import pyplot as plt plt.savefig('foo.png') plt.savefig('foo.pdf') Will give a rasterized or vectorized output respectively, both which could be useful. In addition, you'll find ...


1349

simply run virtualenv -p python3 envname Update after OP's edit: There was a bug in the OP's version of virtualenv, as described here. The problem was fixed by running: pip install --upgrade virtualenv


1331

You need to read the Python Unicode HOWTO. This error is the very first example. Basically, stop using str to convert from unicode to encoded text / bytes. Instead, properly use .encode() to encode the string: p.agent_info = u' '.join((agent_contact, agent_telno)).encode('utf-8').strip() or work entirely in unicode.


1313

Problem Cause In mac os image rendering back end of matplotlib (what-is-a-backend to render using the API of Cocoa by default). There is Qt4Agg and GTKAgg and as a back-end is not the default. Set the back end of macosx that is differ compare with other windows or linux os. I resolve this issue following ways: I assume you have installed the pip ...


1308

I've read the above, realize this is an old question, but it's totally unresolved and still at the top of my google search results so here's an answer that works for everyone: pip install -r /path/to/requirements.txt


1247

Yes, remove removes the first matching value, not a specific index: >>> a = [0, 2, 3, 2] >>> a.remove(2) >>> a [0, 3, 2] del removes the item at a specific index: >>> a = [3, 2, 2, 1] >>> del a[1] >>> a [3, 2, 1] and pop removes the item at a specific index and returns it. >>> a = [4, 3, 5] &...


1240

os.rename(), shutil.move(), or os.replace() All employ the same syntax: import os import shutil os.rename("path/to/current/file.foo", "path/to/new/destination/for/file.foo") shutil.move("path/to/current/file.foo", "path/to/new/destination/for/file.foo") os.replace("path/to/current/file.foo", "path/to/new/destination/for/file.foo") Note that you must ...


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