Hot answers tagged

10

I don't necessarily think "one line way" is the best way. s = set(saved_fields) # set lookup is more efficient for d in fields: d['status'] = d['name'] in s fields # [{'name': 'cherry', 'status': True}, # {'name': 'apple', 'status': True}, # {'name': 'orange', 'status': False}] Simple. Explicit. Obvious. This updates your dictionary in-...


5

You just need to use Counter, and you will solve the problem by using a single line of code: from collections import Counter doc = ["i am a fellow student", "we both are the good student", "a student works hard"] count = dict(Counter(word for sentence in doc for word in sentence.split())) count is your desired ...


5

You can search for spaces which follow : and replace them: df['col_name'] = df['col_name'].str.replace(':\s+', ':')


4

str() on a list does not magically turn said list into a no delimiter string. When you do str(['a', 'b', 'c']) - what you actually get is '['a', 'b', 'c']', which is indeed a string. If you'd like the result to be 'abc' please, use .join. ''.join(['a', 'b', 'c']) Output- 'abc'


4

__add__ only takes two arguments, and when you call c1+c2+c3 it actually calls add(add(c1,c2),c3) if I'm not mistaken. As such, try class A: def __init__(self,a,b,c): self.a=a self.b=b self.c=c def __add__(self,other): h1=self.a+other.a h2=self.b+other.b h3=self.c+other.c return A(h1,h2,h3) ...


4

IIUC you can use stack having filtered on the rfX columns, groupby the index and build a list from the resulting groups: df.filter(regex=r'rf\d').stack().groupby(level=0).agg(list) 0 [12.0] 1 [16.0] 2 [32.0, 18.0, 18.0] dtype: object Or using a list comprehension: [[i for i in row if i==i] for row in df.filter(regex=r'rf\d')...


4

Here is trick replace non matched values to missing values and then using GroupBy.transform for new columns filled by aggregate values: df['Yearly AVG'] = df['Value'].where(df['Value']>0).groupby(df['Date']).transform('mean') print (df) Date Value Yearly AVG 0 2020 0 200.0 1 2020 100 200.0 2 2020 200 200.0 3 2020 ...


4

It won't tell you directly, but for your case, you can test the method you're trying to replace to see if it's an instance of types.BuiltinMethodType: >>> isinstance(Mailbox.get, types.BuiltinMethodType) False >>> isinstance(datetime.now, types.BuiltinMethodType) True inspect.isbuiltin provides the same info: >>> inspect.isbuiltin(...


4

The fundamental problem is that Tcl and Tk are not very happy with non-BMP (Unicode Basic Multilingual Plane) characters. Prior to 8.6.10, what happens is anyone's guess; the implementation simply assumed such characters didn't exist and was known to be buggy when they actually turned up (there's several tickets on various aspects of this). 8.7 will have ...


4

Here you go: import random # initializing toppings list toppings_list = ["pepperoni", "cheese", "sausage", "peppers", "onions", "olives", "green onion", "mushroom", "anchovies", "bacon", "pancetta", "tomatoes", "garlic"] # ...


4

you can use groupby.count by the column Date and with a series made with pd.cut on the score column to label each value with low, mid or high. Then unstack to get column for each category. df_ = (df.groupby([df['Date'], pd.cut(df['score'], bins=[0, 9, 17, np.inf], labels=['low','mid','high'])]) ['score']...


4

Solution with an explicit loop. This is on the assumption that the separators are unordered -- and indeed that it does not matter whether you use the same separator multiple times, or not at all -- just that whenever an element in lst matches any of the separators, it starts a new list. lst = ['a','b','c','d','1','11','111','x','y','z'] sep = ['b','11','y'] ...


4

Try this and let me know if you face any issue/error. Here you go: df.groupby("home_team").home_score.sum()+df.groupby("away_team").away_score.sum()


4

The ampersand (&) character is a bitwise operator. From the Python Wiki page on Bitwise operators: x & y    Does a "bitwise and". Each bit of the output is 1 if the corresponding bit of x AND of y is 1, otherwise it's 0. If you evaluate your expression x >3 & x<=6, the result is: x >3 & x<=6 7 > 3 <= 6 True <= ...


4

This condition: if x >3 & x<=6 is checking if x > (3&x) and (3&x) <= 6. x is 7, so 3&x is equal to 3. So both conditions are true. In general, if you want to check if two conditions are both true, use and. if x > 3 and x <= 6: For what you want in this case, you can do it more concisely: if 3 < x <= 6:


3

You could update the dictionairy with the selected key for x in fields: x.update({'selected': x['name'] in saved_fields}) print(fields) [{'name': 'cherry', 'selected': True}, {'name': 'apple', 'selected': True}, {'name': 'orange', 'selected': False}]


3

The rotation point needs to be computed based on the index of the value and the length of the list, since you want to rotate into the middle we subtract (len(lst)-1)//2 from the index and take the modulus relative to the length to find the rotation point: lst = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] l = len(lst) for n in lst: i = lst.index(n) r = (i-(l-1)//2) % l out =...


3

IIUC, you can use pd.melt and join s = ( pd.melt(df, id_vars=["start", "end"]) .dropna() .groupby(["start", "end"])["variable"] .agg(list) .to_frame("vals") ) df1 = df.set_index(['start','end']).join(s) print(df1) rf1 rf2 rf3 vals start ...


3

You can use itertools.groupby: import itertools as it result = [list(g) for k, g in it.groupby(lst) if k == 0]


3

You can do it with the plt.vlines() (documentation), where you specify the x, ymin and ymax of your vertical line. Se the code above as an example: import numpy as np import seaborn as sns import matplotlib.pyplot as plt corr = np.random.rand(11, 28) fig, ax = plt.subplots(figsize = (12, 6)) sns.heatmap(ax = ax, data = corr) b, t = plt.ylim() ...


3

You can use the find() and rfind() of string and slice the string between the returned indexes for them. print(str[str.find("=")+1: str.rfind("=")]) Or by regex import re str = "GGGGJTJTJTJS=======T=================================A=====GJTSGJGJGJT" print(re.search(r"(?=\=).*(?<=\=)", str).group()) Output ======T=...


3

Use from collections import Counter Counter(" ".join(doc).split()) results in Counter({'i': 1, 'am': 1, 'a': 2, 'fellow': 1, 'student': 3, 'we': 1, 'both': 1, 'are': 1, 'the': 1, 'good': 1, 'works': 1, 'hard': 1}) Explanation: first create one ...


3

try: self.coeff == 3 except: print("Input size is not valid") A Try-Except Chain doesn't work like this. It works when there is an error. But here, there is no error. I suggest you use assert self.coeff == 3, "Input size is not valid". instead, it raises an error, and exits the program, if self.coeff is not equal to 3....


3

I can see you have only adding a keyword in metric column , the same can be achieved using inbuilt spark function as below The withColumn has two functionality If the column is not present it will create a new clumn If the column is there, it will perform the operation on the same column Logic to Concat from pyspark.sql import functions as F df = df....


3

This occurs, because when you use "/r" in the print statement print("Launch in:", contag, end="\r") It replaces the current string on the line, with the new string, but as the string isn't the same length as the new string, the 0 from the 10 from the first value, never gets replaced, as such, to fix this mistake, all you need to ...


3

The module pygame.draw only contains functions for drawing simple shapes. If that's not what you want, then you have to use another module. pygame.image.load is a function that will load an image from your hardrive into main memory. You can think of it like getting an image from your computer into your program. So it doesn't do anything other than making the ...


3

IIUC, this can be done with merge on both ID and the order within each ID: (df1.assign(idx=df1.groupby('ID').cumcount()) .merge(df2.assign(idx=df2.groupby('ID').cumcount()), on=['ID','idx'], suffixes=['','_drop']) [df1.columns] ) Output: ID COL 0 1 A 1 2 F 2 3 A 3 3 S 4 4 D


3

This is documented in docs : So you can do: with pd.option_context('display.multi_sparse', False): print(table) C large small A B bar one 4.0 5.0 bar two 7.0 6.0 foo one 4.0 1.0 foo two NaN 6.0


3

Python's in-place operators can be confusing. The "in-place" refers to the current binding of the object, not necessarily the object itself. Whether the object mutates itself or creates a new object for the in-place binding, depends on its own implementation. If the object implements __iadd__, then the object performs the operation and returns a ...


3

You can use pd.concat with keys parameter then reset_index: pd.concat([df0,df1,df2,df3], keys=['df0', 'df1', 'df2', 'df3']).reset_index(level=0) MCVE: df0 = pd.DataFrame(np.ones((3,3)), columns=[*'ABC']) df1 = pd.DataFrame(np.zeros((3,3)), columns=[*'ABC']) df2 = pd.DataFrame(np.zeros((3,3))+3, columns=[*'ABC']) df3 = pd.DataFrame(np.zeros((3,3))+4, ...


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