Hot answers tagged

6

If you want to do it without declaring any variables you could use itemgetter() and then join first and last returned value. from operator import itemgetter print(''.join(itemgetter(0,-1)(input("What is your full name? ")))) Without importing libraries print(''.join(map(input("What is your full name? ").__getitem__, (0,-1)))) or as @Graipher suggested: ...


5

In the first example, you are trying to insert 'yes' into the list at an index it does not have. (Because an empty list has no position to insert anything into.) In the second example, you are extending the list with the elements of the iterable input.split()1, because my_list += iterable is equivalent to my_list.extend(iterable) Demo: >>> ...


5

Based on your latest edit, you need a "normal" range and the modulo operator: for i in range(START, START + LEN): do_something_with(i % LEN)


5

You can use some collections utils to get to your output: from collections import Counter, defaultdict d1 = {'a': ['b', 'c', 'b'], 'b': ['a', 'd', 'e']} pointed_to = {k: Counter(v) for k, v in d1.items()} pointed_from = defaultdict(dict) for k, v in pointed_to.items(): for k_, v_ in v.items(): pointed_from[k_][k] = v_ # pointed_to {'a': ...


4

What you are asking for is just not JSON. The standards, by definition, specify there has to be a comma between objects. You have two options to go forward: Update your parser to match the standards (highly recommended). For display purposes, or other internal processing you may have, in case you really want the structure you specified: capture the JSON ...


5

str.join(a, b) is equivalent to a.join(b), provided a is a str object and b is an iterable. Strings are always iterable, as you will be iterating though each characters in it when you're iterating over a string. This is basically "insert a copy of a between every element of b (as an iterable)", so if a and b are both strings, a copy of a is inserted into ...


4

Using unnesting function then , drop_duplicates newdf=unnesting(df,['gain','how']).drop_duplicates('how',keep='last') newdf Out[25]: gain how date 0 10 customer1 2018-06-13 0 12 customer2 2018-06-13 0 15 customer3 2018-06-13 1 14 customer4 2018-06-14 2 9 customer7 2018-06-15 2 10 customer8 2018-06-15 2 ...


4

There's no difference between ASCII and UTF-8 when storing digits. A tighter packing would be using 4 bits per digit (BCD). If you want to go below that, you need to take advantage of the fact that long sequences of 10-base values can be presented as 2-base (binary) values.


4

Original question: single series of values You can define a Boolean series according to your condition, then interpolate or ffill as appropriate via numpy.where: # setup df = pd.DataFrame({'date': ['02/03/2016 05:00', '02/03/2016 06:00', '02/03/2016 07:00', '02/03/2016 08:00', '02/03/2016 09:00'], 'value': [8, ...


3

Try this: def reverse(n): m = 0 while n > 0: n, r = divmod(n, 10) m = 10 * m + r return m However, for a real application, I would expect the following to be much faster: def reverse(n): return int(str(n)[::-1]) A few other ways to try to satisfy the silly constraints given in the comments: n = 45712090 s = str(n) t = "...


3

try using this regex /page/(\d+)/ import re from bs4 import BeautifulSoup html = '''<li class="page-item pagination-end"> <a class="page-link page-text" href="xxx/page/3/#filters">3</a> </li>''' soup = BeautifulSoup(html, 'html.parser') endNav = soup.select_one('.page-item.pagination-end a') navNumber = re.search(r'/page/(\d+)/', ...


3

You can, and here's how: def eval_s_vectorized(self, stiff): assert len(self._qs) == self._q_count, "Run 'populate_qs' first!" mats = np.stack([self._vfunc(*k) for k in self._qs], axis=0) evs = np.linalg.eigvalsh(mats) result = np.sum(np.divide(1., (stiff + evs))) return result.real - 4 * self._q_count This still leaves the evaluation ...


3

There are two problems 1.calender is id, not class. 2.To get the href you need to use get_attribute, not text numbers = browser.find_elements(By.XPATH, '//table[@id="calender"]//a') for n in numbers: number = n.get_attribute('href') num.append(number)


3

For general Index like DatetimeIndex use iloc with iat, but it working only with positions, so necessary get_loc: pos = df.columns.get_loc('sell_price') df['profit'] = df.iloc[1:, pos] - df.iat[0, pos] If default RangeIndex use loc with at: df['profit'] = df.loc[1:, 'sell_price'] - df.at[0, 'sell_price'] print (df) date sell_price profit 0 ...


3

This would be kind of a brute force approach with a recursive function: import math def f(temp, numbers): for i, j in zip(temp[:-1], temp[1:]): sqrt = math.sqrt(i+j) if int(sqrt) != sqrt: return False if not numbers: return temp for i in numbers: result = f(temp + [i], [j for j in numbers if j != i]) ...


3

Your first example tries to access the ith element of the list and set it to a value. Since your list is an empty list this element does not exist and therefore you get an error. To get this first snippet working, you would have to append values: values = [] for i in range(t): values.append(i) The second example uses the fact that when adding two ...


3

Given >>> df created_at entities 0 2017-10-29 23:06:28 1 1 2017-10-29 22:28:20 2 2 2017-10-29 20:01:37 3 3 2017-10-29 20:00:14 4 4 2017-10-27 08:44:30 5 5 2017-10-27 08:44:10 6 6 2017-10-27 08:43:13 7 7 2017-10-27 08:43:00 8 with >>> df.dtypes created_at ...


3

There is absolutely no difference in this case; UTF-8 is identical to ASCII in this character range. If storage is an important consideration, maybe look into compression. A simple Huffman compression will use something like 3 bits per byte for this kind of data. If there are periodicity patterns, a modern compression algorithm can take it even further.


3

You need to wait until all threads are done calling Thread.join: HOWTO: Replace your self.threads = 5 expression with class constant: THREAD_NUM = 5 Put additional attribute threads (for a list of threads) into your __init__ method: ... self.threads = [] Put each created thread into threads list: for j in range(self.THREAD_NUM): t = threading....


3

from itertools import chain for n in chain(range(3,8), range(3)): ... The chain() returns an iterator with 3, 4, ..., 7, 0, 1, 2


2

In general, there should be no need for error-specific callbacks. Asyncio fully supports propagating exceptions across await boundaries inside coroutines, as well as across calls like run_until_complete where sync and async code meet. When someone awaits your coroutine, you can just raise an exception in the usual way. One pitfall is with the coroutines ...


2

To test cdef-fuctionality you need to write you tests in Cython. One could try to use cpdef-functions, however not all signatures can be used in this case. To access the cdef-functions you need to "export" them via pxd-file: #my_module.pyx: cdef double foo(double a) nogil: return 3. * a #my_module.pxd: cdef double foo(double a) nogil Now the ...


2

You’re right that the delegating generator assigns to results[key], but it doesn’t finish by doing that. Its execution continues, since there’s nowhere for it to suspend. Of course, it immediately falls off the end, causing the send(None) to raise StopIteration (since there’s no value (from a yield) for it to return). The while True: is a sort of silly ...


2

@tel has done most of the work. Here is how you can gain another 2x speedup on top of their 20x. Do the linear algebra manually. When I tried that I was shocked how wasteful numpy is on small matrices: >>> from timeit import timeit # using eigvalsh >>> print(timeit("test(False, 0.1)", setup="from __main__ import test", number=3)) -...


2

You need another cursor, e.g.: with conn: with conn.cursor() as cur: cur.execute('select id,field1 from table1') for id, field1 in cur.fetchall(): print(id,field1) with conn.cursor() as cur_update: cur_update.execute('update table1 set field1 = %s where id = %s', (f(field1), id)) Note ...


2

Try following: for i in range(n): for j in range(n): print("a[{}][{}]\t".format(i,j),end="") print("") which result in: a[0][0] a[0][1] a[0][2] a[1][0] a[1][1] a[1][2] a[2][0] a[2][1] a[2][2]


2

Using f-strings, you can do: n = 3 for i in range(n): for j in range(n): print(f'a[{i}][{j}]', end='\t') print() # a[0][0] a[0][1] a[0][2] # a[1][0] a[1][1] a[1][2] # a[2][0] a[2][1] a[2][2]


2

You need to write your dataframe as unicode: test.to_csv('checkme.txt', sep='\t', encoding='utf-8')


2

This should give you what you need: from itertools import product import numpy as np def splitcubes(K, d): coords = [np.linspace(-1.0 , 1.0, num=K + 1) for i in range(d)] grid = np.stack(np.meshgrid(*coords)).T mid = (K + 1)//2 for slices in product(*([(slice(None, mid + 1), slice(mid, None))]*d)): yield grid[slices] def cubesets(...


2

No only MultiIndex, it should be used in Index too, because there is only one level. Also for function agg with specified column for aggregate is necessary pass list of tuples for specifies name of new columns with aggregated functions: df1 = (df.groupby('STNAME')['CENSUS2010POP'] .agg({'avg': np.average, 'sum': np.sum})) FutureWarning: using a ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible