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6

I found out that RadioTab headers are not part of any Dot11 protocol but are merely added by the network interface. And the reason I got the RadioTab headers on sample packets from Wireshark.org and not from my live wireshark capture is because some network adapters do not add RadioTap while others do and the network adapter of my laptop does not add ...


6

You can use set intersection >>> from functools import reduce >>> >>> my_list = [[2,3,5,6,7,8,9], [2,4,78,23,13,7], [3,2,5,98,23,1,34]] >>> list(reduce(lambda x, y: set(x).intersection(set(y)), my_list)) [2] >>>


4

This was a bug in scapy Bug: https://github.com/secdev/scapy/issues/2400 Which fixed recently Fix: https://github.com/secdev/scapy/pull/2395 Latest code. https://github.com/secdev/scapy


4

On many systems pip defaults to version 2, rather than version 3. It is a best practice to always specify which version you want by entering either pip2 or pip3 instead of using the default pip. In this case, running pip3 install scapy should resolve the error. EDIT: You will additionally need to run pip3 install crcmod, likewise for each other package ...


4

You want the TTL? Lets start at the high level, and move down. Scapy is giving you the constructed packet. If you want the TTL of the packet, call the attribute: >>> plist[182].ttl 64 If you want to get the specific byte of the packet, lets look at the hexdump: >>> hexdump(plist[182]) 0000 AA BB CC 66 42 DE AA BB CC 3F 52 A3 08 00 45 ...


3

Not sure if there is a better solution, but here's what I did to get around my problem. The accumulated frame-sizes seem to agree with what Wireshark does when it reassembles TLS frame from multiple packets. Note: This solution assumes there are no misordered packets or duplicates. Also, the solution shown here is not complete. The code below only shows how ...


3

I had the same error and found a fix to it. Run these commands pip uninstall scapy pip uninstall scapy-http pip install scapy==2.4.2 pip install scapy-http==1.8.2


3

Just a guess comparing your two snippets, but I suspect you have a namespace clash (welcome to the joys of programming) and that's precisely why import * is bad practice. scapy has a datetime method too (haven't compared the definition between the two packages), so in this context the import order does matter because the definition of datetime is overridden....


3

At line 2, use raw instead of str. I extracted some frame from a pcap file as you did and here is what I get: >>> str(p) WARNING: Calling str(pkt) on Python 3 makes no sense! "b'\\xf4\\xca\\xe5Cu\\...


3

\x1bfgM are actually 4 bytes: \x1b, f, g and M. All characters in your bytes string that can be converted to ASCII characters (a-z, A-Z, 0-9, punctuation characters, ...) are printed as such and not using the \x prefix. For instance: >>> b'\x24\x28\x7c' b'$(|'


2

FTR, see https://scapy.readthedocs.io/en/latest/routing.html Get router IP address >>> gw = conf.route.route("0.0.0.0")[2] >>> gw '10.0.0.1'


2

If you have a look at https://scapy.readthedocs.io/en/latest/routing.html#get-local-ip-ip-of-an-interface you can get the local IP of any of your interfaces using >>> ip = get_if_addr(conf.iface) # default interface >>> ip = get_if_addr("eth0") >>> ip '10.0.0.5'


2

You should use the sent_time parameter. For instance, if you are using sr, you can do: ans, unans = sr(IP(dst="www.google.com")/ICMP()) timestamp = ans[0][1].time - a[0][0].sent_time In your example: packet = IP(dst=ip)/ICMP() a = sr1(packet) timestamp = a.time - packet.sent_time Works too


2

I like to add something to @Daniel answer. Your real problem is not scapy package. Your real problem is in your python file name. Don't ever use library name or its contents as your file name. In your case, your file name is scapy.py. After that you import scappy. In here you accidentally call your python file as object in your code there for your compiler ...


2

This answer is scoped to the question's title and content: Providing getters and setters for frequency and channel of a packet. For this solution, use the wpa-Induction.pcap file in Wireshark's Sample Captures. Poking around It's useful to poke around one packet to see what fields Scapy has access to in the Scapy interpreter. >>> pkts = rdpcap('...


2

Following code worked: from scapy.contrib.gtp_v2 import GTPHeader as GTPHeader from scapy.contrib.gtp_v2 import GTPV2EchoRequest as GTPV2EchoRequest from scapy.contrib.gtp_v2 import IE_RecoveryRestart as IE_RecoveryRestart ie = IE_RecoveryRestart(ietype='Recovery Restart', length=1, restart_counter=17, CR_flag=0, instance=0) gtp = Ether()/IP(dst="10.15.11....


2

The problem is that your OS is receiving the SYN-ACK packet, has no idea why it was sent (as the OS itself didn't start a handshake) and reset the connection. You can find some solutions here (for Linux)- Unwanted RST TCP packet with Scapy Another option is to use a different IP than the OS's, or in Windows turn off the IP stack of the used interface (...


2

The error tells you exactly what you need to know. IndexError: Layer ['IP'] not found One of the packets in your packet captures that does not contain an IP layer. You need to check if the IP layer exists before accessing it. For example, an ARP packet will not have an IP layer and will break your code. Using this pcap from wireshark's sample captures, ...


2

From the source code, you can either call build method or you can pass your IP object to bytes directly as IP implements the __bytes__ dunder method: from scapy.layers.inet import IP p = IP(dst="github.com") print(p) # b'E\x00\x00\x14\x00\x01\x00\x00@\x00l\x82\n\x0c\x02\x05\x8cRv\x04' print(p.build()) # b'E\x00\x00\x14\x00\x01\x00\x00@\x00l\x82\n\...


2

Some people continue to tell me that I can't use socks to send tcp packets. It's not true. It is true even if you don't like it. A proxy (HTTP proxy or Socks proxy) is not a packet forwarder on the network level. It is instead a payload forwarder at the application level. If you want a packet forwarder you need a real VPN (with the focus on "N", i.e. ...


2

Problems You have 5 problems that I can see: You're not importing xlsxwriter. This is important for this to be an MCVE. The last 2 writes are indented one space (Python cares about this). You aren't closing the workbook so the file isn't being saved. Vars a, a1, and b should be more descriptive (this SO answer demonstrates why) You build a packet named a1 (...


2

I can't find the proper dupe now, but this is just a miss-use/miss-understanding of str(). The original data is in a bytes format, for instance x = b'moo'. When str() retrieves your bytes string, it will do so by calling the __str__ function of the bytes class/object. That will return a representation of itself. The representation will keep b at the ...


2

I ran a few things, to see why. is it not a problem of padding. I try to pad the packet to 60B as mandatory in network. (your wiresahrd says captured 57B so it is under). It has never been a problem for me, but I had to check. I open an exemple capture from wireshark. https://wiki.wireshark.org/SampleCaptures?action=AttachFile&do=view&target=stp....


2

I think taht you need to replace the layer Dot3 by Ether here are 3 exemples: your original, scapy seems happy what I think you did (I inferred from "I added Dot1Q(vlan=214) =>") replace of Dot3 by Ether for the 3 exemples: from scapy.layers.inet import SNAP from scapy.layers.l2 import Ether, Dot3, Dot1Q, LLC, STP data = "test" ...


2

srp returns a tuple of ans_result and unans_result. You use [0] for ans_result. If you want to unpack both, use: ans, unans = scapy.srp(arp_request_broadcast,timeout=1,verbose=False)


2

The r prefix has nothing to do with scapy. r means raw string. This means that backslashes in the string are treated as literal characters. See python docs. For instance: >>> print(r'\n') \n


2

You have several options: from the reference doc: e.g. IP: https://scapy.readthedocs.io/en/latest/api/scapy.layers.inet.html#scapy.layers.inet.IP This has a lot of infos. from the console: download scapy and use ./run_scapy then do ls(IP) >>> ls(IP) version : BitField (4 bits) = (4) ihl : BitField (4 bits) ...


2

You can create a scapy socket and call sr1 or sniff on it. For instance from scapy.config import conf sock = conf.L3socket() sock.sr1(....) sock.sniff(...) Because it is the same socket, you won't be losing any packets


2

In generate you should let scapy put the protocol types that link the layers. import scapy.all as scapy from scapy.layers.inet import Ether, Dot3 from scapy.contrib.lacp import SlowProtocol, LACP from scapy.layers.l2 import LLC, SNAP, STP data='test' pkt = Dot3(dst="01:00:0c:cc:cc:cd", src="08:17:35:51:29:2e") \ / LLC(dsap=0xaa, ...


2

scapy in known to be slow. I would avoid scapy for big files. the best way, is to use tshark exemple: tshark -r my_capture.pcap -Y "(ip.src == 192.168.1.10) && (ip.dst == 172.27.224.70)" -w /tmp/my_filtered_capture.pcap If you need the result in python, you can call that then parser the result after.


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