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5

Try explode then replace and agg back ,d is your dict out = s.explode().replace(d).groupby(level=0).agg(list)


3

An elegant solution is to: Start with a list of sizes (how many chars should be in each "segment"). Create a (compiled) Regex pattern with named capturing groups, each capturing a stated number of chars. Use str.extract to extract the required substrings from your Series. Group names will be used as names of output columns. Assuming that s is the ...


2

Once you've got col, you can convert it to your expected output: In [1109]: col = '"MeasDescriptionTest", "SiteLocTest", "SavingsCalcsProvided", "BiMonthlyTest"' In [1114]: cols = [i.strip() for i in col.replace('"', '').split(',')] In [1115]: cols Out[1115]: ['MeasDescriptionTest', 'SiteLocTest', '...


1

You can specify using dtype parameter pd.Series(data, dtype=str) for more information click here


1

Performance Consideration on multiple columns "Chained Assignment" with and without using .loc Let me supplement the already very good answers with the consideration of system performance. The question itself includes a comparison on the system performance (execution time) of 2 pieces of codes with and without using .loc. The execution times are ...


1

Try the vectorized Pandas functions: ((x_pd.diff()**2 + y_pd.diff()**2)**.5).sum()


1

Use loc and the series's index as the column name lst = [ [2,3,4], [5,6,7], [7,8,9] ] df = pd.DataFrame(lst, columns=list("ABC")) print(df) ### A B C 0 2 3 4 1 5 6 7 2 7 8 9 s1 = pd.Series(list("xyz")) s1.index = list("DEF") print(s1) ### D x E y F z dtype: object s2 = pd.Series(list("...


1

Simply filter by: df = df[df['amount']<df['records']] and you get the desired results: order_id amount records 1 2 5 10 3 4 1 3


1

df.loc[~df.amount.gt(df.records)] order_id amount records 1 2 5 10 3 4 1 3 Explanation: comparisions return a boolean: ~df.amount.gt(df.records) 0 False 1 True 2 False 3 True dtype: bool This returns values where amount is not greater than records. You can use this boolean to index into the ...


1

I just figured this out, its a "feature" of how pandas must do OR operations. It turned out that I had previously dropped some rows from "t", and while it was the same size as the other variable, its index was slightly larger. After dropping the index to a default using Series.reset_index(), I get the results initially expected.


1

You can also use the agg method, which is more flexible as it allows you to set column alias or add other types of aggregations: import pyspark.sql.functions as F df.groupby('Age', 'Siblings').agg(F.count('*').alias('count'))


1

And yet another solution would be to count the length of the streak and to filter out all results which have more than one element. The following code starts with count 0 for the first element and uses the successor predicate s/1 for counting: deleteInc(In, Out):- countInc(In,0,InC), delInc(InC,Out). countInc([A], C, [(A,C)]). countInc([A,B|L], C, ...


1

Another approach would be to just check for 3 succeeding elements if the middle one is smaller than the first but larger than the third. If this is the case: store the element. If this is is not the case: check the list without the first head element. Add a rule for 2 elements left. Also there needs to be a special treatment for the very first element, ...


1

I would implement it like this: deleteInc(In, Out):- deleteInc(In,Out,new). deleteInc([A],[A],new). deleteInc([_],[],incr). deleteInc([H1,H2|T],L,_):- H2>=H1, !, deleteInc([H2|T],L,incr). deleteInc([H1,H2|T],T2,incr):- H2<H1, deleteInc([H2|T],T2,new). deleteInc([H1,H2|T],[H1|T2],new):- H2<H1, deleteInc([H2|T],T2,new)....


1

Here's what I did, assuming it's checking three values at a time: deleteInc([],[]). deleteInc([H1,H2,_H3|T],L):- H2>=H1, !, deleteInc(T,L). deleteInc([H1,H2|T],[H1,H2|T2]):- H2<H1,!, deleteInc(T,T2). Example: ?-deleteInc([2,4,6,5,8,12,8,3],L). L = [8, 3] ?-deleteInc([2,4,6,5,8,12,15,21,25,7,3],L). L = [7, 3] ?-deleteInc([2,4,6,5,...


1

You should use it like this: import numpy as np print(np.prod((1,2))**5) #(1*2)**5 print(np.sum(np.power((1,2),5))) #(1**5 + 2**5)


1

I think you can do: any(m) If m is a boolean list and any one of the element is True, any(m) will return True


1

Use np.where after coercing the dates to datetime. import numpy as np df_1['date']=pd.to_datetime(df_1['date']) df_2['date']=pd.to_datetime(df_2['date']) df=pd.merge(df_2,df_1, how='left', on='order_id',suffixes=('_left', '')) df=df.assign(date=np.where(df['date'].isna()|df['date_left'].sub(df['date']).dt.days.gt(0),df['date_left'],df['date'])).drop('...


1

Another possible solution that comes to mind given the structure of cols is: list(eval(cols[0])) # ['MeasDescriptionTest', 'SiteLocTest', 'SavingsCalcsProvided', 'BiMonthlyTest'] Although this is valid, it's less safe and I would go with list-comprehension as @MayankPorwal suggested.


1

You need matching values in both DataFrames before compare, this solution use Series.map, another left join in DataFrame.merge and then set values by DataFrame.loc: #convert to datetimes if necessary df_1['date'] = pd.to_datetime(df_1['date']) df_2['date'] = pd.to_datetime(df_2['date']) s = df_2.set_index('order_id')['date'] mapped = df_1['order_id'].map(s)...


1

If need convert sorted index values like 40.0 use rename: df['value'].value_counts().sort_index().rename(index=str) If need convert count values like 1448 use Series.astype: df['value'].value_counts().sort_index().astype(str)


1

Here's an option using apply(): df = pd.DataFrame({'description': ['children wine glass', 'candles', 'christmas tree', 'bottle', 'soldiers', 'bag']}) def categorize(desc): lst = [] for w in desc.split(' '): if w in fashion: lst.append('fashion') if w in general: lst.append('general') if w in decor: ...


1

Did you possibly want a scatter plot with connected lines so that you could identify the different datasets? Here I used the same for-loop approach and holding the plot using hold on. In the line plot(t,y(:,n),'.-'); the term '.-' is used to indicate to plot the data with connected lines and dots at the data points. As the comment above indicated for a ...


1

You can try to use only one loop : Initialize the term to 1 Initialize an IncreaseFactor to 21 At each pass : Compute num of spaces Print spaces like pp182 suggested (guard against zero spaces) Print the term Print spaces like pp182 suggested (guard against zero spaces) Multiply Term by 100, and Add the IncreaseFactor to Term Multiply IncreaseFactor by 10 ...


1

I use 3 loops in my code #include <math.h> #include <stdio.h> int main() { int n=5; for(int i=1;i<=n;i++) {printf("\n"); for(int j=n-1;j>=i;j--) { printf(" "); } for(int k=i-1;k>=-(i-1);k--) { printf("%d",i-abs(k)); } } printf("\n&...


1

You can fusion the two first loops making an if else statement and using de answer below to print x spaces with one single print for(i=1;i<=x;i++){ printf(" "); } for(i=1; i<=num; i++) { printf("%d", i); } printf("%*c", n+1, '1'); for(i=1; i<=num; i++) { printf("%d", i); } or specify the number ...


1

Instead of using a for loop, you can specify the number of spaces you wish to output using printf printf("%*c", n, ' ');


1

First turn your column into a list words = list(moreuses.values()) Then join the values string_of_words = " ".join(words) Then generate your word cloud wordcloud = WordCloud().generate(string_of_words) Note: Untested, as no sample data was given.


1

1. Using the sorting NA's approach in Shubham's answer, I've come up with this - Utilise Pandas apply and Python sorted : series = pd.Series(['1:25.842', pd.NA, '0:15.413', '54.154', '3:2:06.284'], dtype='string') df = series.str.split(':', expand=True) # key for sorted is `pd.notna`, so False(0) sorts before True(1) df.apply(sorted, axis=1, key=pd.notna, ...


1

You can attack the problem earlier by padding series with '0:' as follows: # setup series = pd.Series(['1:25.842', pd.NA, '0:15.413', '54.154', '3:2:06.284'], dtype='string') # create a padding of 0 series counts = 2 - series.str.count(':') pad = pd.Series(['0:' * c if pd.notna(c) and c > 0 else '' for c in counts], dtype='string') # apply padding res = ...


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