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4

TL;DR: closures created by tail-call-optimized functions must capture a copy of (relevant parts of) their definitional environment. Or, just ignore the TCO part, and treat it as you would a regular recursive function, where any lambda function created during the recursive function's execution is a closure, captures the values of variables that it refers to. ...


4

The pi-sum procedure in the book is making use of the higher-order procedure sum, defined earlier in 1.3.1. The sum procedure takes a and b as arguments which describe the bounds of the summation, and it takes term and next as arguments which describe how to create a term from a, and how to get the next a from the current a. Both term and next need to be ...


3

You need to use #%require. #%require is actually a primitive type in the lowest level of racket and it is slightly different than require: #lang sicp (#%require rackunit "xxx.scm") The file you want to test becomes a module so you can use it from other code by providing the identifiers you want to expose: (#%provide procedure-name) You can also ...


2

TL; DR: A procedure and function means the same in the context of SICP. In mathematics a function is something that you apply with arguments and returns a value and would always return the same values to the same arguments. You could replace it with a map between the arguments to the result. In programming languages like Scheme or JavaScript the use of the ...


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The first thing to point out is that is not exactly accurate since x is just an approximation. The correct notation is . This might seem a little nitpicky but it's important because this explains the exercise and the definition of sine given in the book. The way and are combined is in the definition of the sine procedure. The idea is that we would like to ...


2

Previous answers are great. I'll add another one that explains in a more thorough way. Another way to think of this difference is like this: How is the recursion using if stopping at some point and the one using new-if looping forever? First lets see how these two ifs work in general and then how they work for this case. if This is explained by @alex-vasi: ...


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Here is what I think is a rather natural approach to this in Scheme. Although people (notably me) obsess about making processes iterative rather than recursive rather too much (why is stack space so much more valuable than the potentially huge agenda that this code creates?), it is quite nice to write iterative programs for this sort of thing. This function ...


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Notice that the question asks for the number of distinct pairs in any structure, so we have to be careful and avoid counting more than once the same pair, even if it's in a different place within the structure! Also notice the hint: Traverse the structure, maintaining an auxiliary data structure that is used to keep track of which pairs have already been ...


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map replaces each element of a list with a new element in its place: 1 2 3 4 ... 10 20 30 40 ... flatmap replaces each element of a list with some new elements in its place: 1 2 3 4 ... 10 11 20 40 41 42 43 ... As you can ...


1

There are several things wrong with your program. Apart from anything else, even if halve worked the way you want it to work, how would b become zero? This is not the only problem! However the particular case of halve happens because you are assuming programming languages to do what they normally do: incorrect arithmetic which is convenient for the machine,...


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fn good_enough<T: Copy + Sub<Output = T> + Mul<Output = T> + FromPrimitive + PartialOrd>(guess: T, x: T) -> bool { abs(square(guess) - x) < FromPrimitive::from_f64(0.0001).unwrap() } You need to convert 0.0001 to T because T only implements PartialOrd. Or you can make T: PartialOrd<f64> but it'll make the function not able ...


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From @Memes's answer, I've gone ahead and added scheme code for it: (define (display-all . vs) (for-each display vs)) (define (find-e-k n) (define (find-e-k-iter possible-k possible-e) (if (= (remainder possible-k 2) 0) (find-e-k-iter (/ possible-k 2) (+ possible-e 1)) (values possible-e possible-k))) (find-e-k-iter (- n 1) 0)) ; ...


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