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5

The else is returning a string, so that is one problem. Another would be caused only if e.Amount were stored as a string -- horror of horrors, not storing a value with the correct type. So, if that is the code that causing the problems, I would recommend: SUM(CASE WHEN ec.UserCode >= 100 AND ec.UserCode <= 200 THEN TRY_CONVERT(?, e.Amount) ...


4

You can use row_number() select * from ( select *, row_number() over(partition by y, z order by t) as rn from tablename )A where rn=1


4

Your subquery yields an empty table. Your ALL clause constitutes a universal quantification. Mathematically, a universal quantification over an empty set always yields TRUE (because there is no member in the set -no row in the table- that makes it FALSE). So contrary to your expectation, you are just doing WHERE TRUE instead of WHERE FALSE. SQL should be ...


3

You can use a case expression or nullif(). Something like this: select coalesce(nullif(col, ''), <replacement value>) as col If the logic is more complicated -- say strings of blanks -- then case is simpler: select (case when col is null or replace(col, ' ') = '' then <replacement value> else col end) as col


3

One method is to aggregate first and then join: select a.month, (a_cost2 - b_cost2) as difference from (select month, sum(a.cost2) as a_cost2 from Table1 a where a.month = 'January' group by month ) a left join (select b.month, sum(b.cost2) as b_cost2 from Table2 b where b.month = 'January' group by month ) ...


3

I would approach this as a gaps and islands problem. You want to group together groups of adjacents rows whose periods overlap. Here is one way to solve it using lag() and a cumulative sum(). Everytime the open date is greater than the closed date of the previous record, a new group starts. select cust_id, min(open_date) open_date, max(...


3

XSD stands for XML Schema Definition and is used to describe an XML document's structure, constraints, data types. So you would put data in an XML document but the structure/format of that document (without any data) would be described by an associated XSD. Since you are talking about data, you probably want an XML document (and not an XSD) and can use ...


3

You would use top and order by: select top (4) t.* from t order by age asc;


3

The best solution is to create a proper foreign key that is defined with on delete cascade. Which requires to store a NULL value rather than a magic "zero" in the parent_id column: create table family ( id int primary key, name varchar(5), parent_id int, foreign key (parent_id) references family on delete cascade ); Then all you need is: ...


3

You can conditional aggregation: select job, class, employee sum(case when paytype = 1 then hours else 0 end) ot, sum(case when paytype = 2 then hours else 0 end) st from mytable group by jobs, class, employee


3

This is documented. See Comparison conditions If a subquery returns zero rows, the condition evaluates to TRUE. so - all rows are returned.


3

SQL is a descriptive language, not a procedural language. That is, a SQL query describes what the result set looks like, not how the result is produced. In fact, what the engine runs is called a directed acyclic graph (DAG) -- and that looks nothing like a query. The SQL engine first parses the query, then compiles it, then optimizes it to produce the DAG....


2

Something based on this? DECLARE @DataSource TABLE ( [OrderID] INT ,[CustomerID] INT ,[ItemID] INT ,[ItemName] NVARCHAR(128) ); INSERT INTO @DataSource ([OrderID], [CustomerID], [ItemID], [ItemName]) VALUES (1, 14, 6, 'Apples') ,(2, 14, 7, 'Oranges') ,(3, 23, 10, 'Mangoes'); WITH DataSource AS ( SELECT DISTINCT [CustomerID] ...


2

Always join tables together on their relationships (in this case orders.id with order_items.order_id) and then group. to avoid duplicating order_sums for multiple order_items when joining, first group order_items by order_id. select date(o.created_at) date_of_month, sum(i.total_energy_used), max(o.created_at), sum(order_sum) as ...


2

LIKE in MySQL does not support wildcards. You can do something similar with regular expressions: SELECT CITY FROM STATION WHERE LOWER(CITY) REGEXP '^[aeiou]';


2

Union statements require an equal number of columns and each column needs to match type. Without the table definitions it's hard for us to narrow down, but you have a different amount of columns in your separate select statements as well. Try adding one section at a time to the union as a select statement and pay attention to the column types, and once you ...


2

join don't match .. in this case use left join could be some of your values don't match be sure you have not hiddden chars using TRIM() SELECT L.user_id,L.item_type_id,F.found_by FROM tbl_users AS U JOIN tbl_lost_items AS L ON U.id = L.user_id JOIN tbl_item_types AS IT ON IT.id = L.item_type_id JOIN tbl_found_items AS F ON F....


2

You could use a TRY_CONVERT which will return null if the conversion fails Then you can test for null or replace those with a 0 CASE WHEN TRY_CONVERT(float, ec.UserCode) IS NULL THEN 0 ELSE CONVERT(float, ec.UserCode) https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/t-sql/functions/try-convert-transact-sql?view=sql-server-ver15


2

You forgot to add userid in your group by list. So your updated query might look like - ;with postvotes as ( select v.creationdate, , p.id postid , case v.votetypeid when 1 then 'accepts' when 2 then 'up-votes' when 3 then 'down-votes' when 9 then 'bounty_recieved' end vote_type , case p.posttypeid ...


2

That because of table projects may contains unique values, if you want duplicate you need a JOIN : select p.project_code, pc.distinct_code from projects p inner join -- you may need LEFT JOIN instead only_project_code pc on pc.distinct_code = p.project_code;


2

Your chunk header probably should be {SQL, connection=con, output.var="df"} instead of {r SQL, connection=con, output.var="df"}


2

I suspect that you want: select NotificationID, NotificationTypeID, CreatedOn from Notification order by max(CreatedOn) over(partition by NotificationTypeID) desc, CreatedOn desc This will put first the NotificationTypeID that has the greatest CreatedOn, and then order records that have the same NotificationTypeID by descending CreatedOn.


2

you can use this function, this take out the last n characters of a string. if you use 1, it will take out the last digit. SELECT RIGHT(host_response_rate, 1) FROM ...


2

Use modulo arithmetic. Many dialects of SQL use % for modulus: SELECT col1, col2, ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY col1 ORDER BY col2) % 2 as col3 FROM mytable; Some use the function MOD(): SELECT col1, col2, MOD(ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY col1 ORDER BY col2), 2) as col3 FROM mytable; EDIT: You don't want to alternate rows. You ...


2

Use regexp_substr(): select regexp_substr('My address is 26854, Apt 556, Livonia, MI 48354', '[0-9]+', 1, 1) from dual;


2

There is no need to compute the epoch. Subtraction of timestamps gives an interval which directly converted: with timestamps (tsa, tsb) as (values ('2020-01-15T06:15:00'::timestamp, '2020-01-15T18:15:00'::timestamp)) select to_char(tsb-tsa,'hh24:mi:ss') from timestamps;


2

Use case logic: select s.*, (case when s.host = ul.primary_server then 'primary' when s.host = ul.secondary_server then 'secondary' else 'wrong node' end) as server from sessions s left join userlist ul on s.login = ul.login;


2

You need to UNNEST WITH data AS( SELECT 'Joe' as name, SPLIT('17.99,12.00,15.00,17.99', ',') AS r ) SELECT name,r FROM data, UNNEST(r) r "name","r" "Joe","17.99" "Joe","12.00" "Joe","15.00" "Joe","17.99"


2

It looks like you want to know number of orders in each category So, you need first to map each order to category and then group by it, like that: select SalesAmountCategory, count(*) from ( Select case when ((SalesAmount-TaxAmt-Freight)>=100000) then '>$100000' when ((SalesAmount-TaxAmt-Freight)>=50000) then '$50000-$100000' ...


2

If your question is really just, "is it a bad design practice to use a database (edit: or database table) to hold only one piece--or a few pieces--of data", I would say probably not. Databases are a place to hold data, and they very easily scale. You might at some point need to hold more data, and in the future a lot more data, and databases do that very ...


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