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5

Just test the first letter in a list comprehension: s = "A dog is a good pet" def consonant_first(newstr): return [word for word in s.split() if word[0].lower() not in 'aeiou'] print(consonant_first(s)) Make sure to test against all cases so you catch the A. result: ['dog', 'good', 'pet']


5

starts_with takes an argument which implements Pattern. There is not a Pattern instance for String, but there is one for &String. fn main() { let a = String::from("hello world!"); let b = String::from("hello"); a.starts_with(&b); }


4

You can try regular expressions, Regex.Replace Code: using System.Text.RegularExpressions; ... Regex regex = new Regex( @"\""(?<date>[0-9]{4}-[0-9]{2}-[0-9]{2})T[0-9]{2}:[0-9]{2}:[0-9]{2}(?:\.[0-9]{1,})?Z?\"""); Func<string, string> convert = (source) => regex.Replace(source, m => "\"" + m.Groups["date"].Value + "\""); Demo: ...


4

do a s.nextLine(); After reading the int values (m and n). To clear the eol caracter before using s.nextline to read the input public static void main(String[] args){ int n, m; System.out.println("Enter the size of 2d array: "); Scanner s = new Scanner(System.in); n = s.nextInt(); m = s.nextInt(); s.nextLine(); String[][] arr =...


4

You get this warning when you use any of the "unsafe" byte copying functions. It's mostly specific to MSVC. To fix it, use strcpy_s which requires you to also pass a maximum number of bytes to copy (which should be the size of the destination buffer). This prevents buffer overflows. strcpy_s(chArray, phrase.size()+1, phrase.c_str()); That said, it's ...


4

Visual studio compiler says: 'strcpy': This function or variable may be unsafe. This is because you've used strcpy, and your compiler considers it a potentially unsafe function. The purpose of the warning is to inform you of this perceived lack of safety. The message advises you how to disable the warning in case you wish to keep using the function. The ...


3

split returns a list of tokens from the word. So if you have babba then split('a') will go and return ['b', 'bb', ''] because 'a' appears at the end of the word. use count() rather. >>> a = 'babba' >>> a.count('a') 2 >>> a.count('b') 3


3

You can do something like below. >>> "This is my string".split(" ", 2) ['This', 'is', 'my string'] >>>


2

There is no need of an iteration when you can slice list: strings[:strings.index('note')+1] where s is your input list of strings. The end slice is exclusive, hence a +1 makes sure 'note' is part. In case of missing data ('note'): try: final_lst = strings[:strings.index('note')+1] except ValueError: final_lst = strings


2

This is a commonly used way to split a string into characters; once you have one record for each character, counting them is quite straightforward: select single_char, count(*) from ( select substr(x, level, 1) as single_char from (select 'abbabbaccb' x from dual) connect by level <= length(x) ) group by single_char


2

If I understand your question, you want to pass a vector which has column names and indices and you want to get back a vector with column indices only. Then the following should help; df <- data.table::fread("a b c d e f g h i j 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10", header = TRUE) columns <- c(1:...


2

There are two ways to do this: In [94]: s = 'aackcdldccc' In [95]: collections.Counter(s) Out[95]: Counter({'a': 2, 'c': 5, 'k': 1, 'd': 2, 'l': 1}) In [96]: d = {} In [97]: for char in s: ...: d.setdefault(char, 0) ...: d[char] += 1 ...: In [98]: d Out[98]: {'a': 2, 'c': 5, 'k': 1, 'd': 2, 'l': 1}


2

In XSLT 3.0 you can use parse-xml(). There's no guaranteed-portable way of doing it in XSLT 2.0. Some processors may offer an extension function similar to parse-xml(), some may allow you to implement your own extension functions, some may support the "data" URI scheme in the document() function.


1

Both of your snippets work almost the way you mention. The only difference is that the line that includes your list has spaces after each comma. The attached code gives exactly the output you wanted. l = ["one","two","three"] aStr = """ blah blah blah blah = %s blah blah """% ('["'+'","'.join(l)+'"]') So what does that do? The most interesting part here ...


1

You can use the replace string method to do this: '"' + data_to_read.replace("\n", '","') + '"'


1

This works also for python versions that support f-strings: new_str = ','.join([f'"{item}"' for item in data_to_read.split()])


1

You can use a single, much simpler RegExp for this: hex = hex.replace(/' ?\+ ?'/g, ''); That says "replace all single-quotes, followed by possibly a space, then a plus, then possibly another space, followed by another single quote" and replaces those matches with nothing, thus removing them. (You need the \ before the + because + is a special character in ...


1

function getDifference(a, b) { var i = 0; var j = 0; var result = ""; while (j < b.length) { if (a[i] != b[j] || i == a.length) result += b[j]; else i++; j++; } return result; } console.log(getDifference("lebronjames", "...


1

String.prototype.toUpperCase() works on objects that can be converted to strings. Unfortunately the Range objects aren't converted to strings automatically. In the case of val.toUpperCase();, the value assigned to val isn't changed. Change the following code lines //test 2 part 1 - convert value to upper case/// not working val.toUpperCase(); //test 2 ...


1

you can take the following steps: import csv list= [tuple(row) for row in csv.reader(open(filename, 'rU'))] Above code will get you your data in the form : list = [('Orange', 'Apple', 'Strawberry', 'Banana'), (1, 12, 5, 11), (2, 3, 10, 9)] the next step you can perform is : new_list = [x[3] for x in list] output : new_list = ['Banana', 11, 9] I hope ...


1

Ex. from collections import defaultdict import csv the_data = defaultdict(list) with open("fruit_data.csv", "r") as fd: ...


1

The reason that you aren't getting any results is likely that when you call readlines() on a file in Python it gives you a list of each line with a newline character, \n, attached to the end. Therefore your program would be checking if "roger\n" is in a line in the movies files rather than just "roger". To fix this, you could simply add a [:-1] to your if ...


1

This works .... Movies="""Independence Day Who Framed Roger Rabbit Rosemary's Baby Ghostbusters There's Something About Mary """ Names="""Roger Kyle Mary Sam""" with StringIO(Movies) as movie_file: movies=[n.strip().lower() for n in movie_file.readlines()] with StringIO(Names) as name_file: names=[n.strip().lower() for n in name_file.readlines()] ...


1

The following should work: Dim MyStr As String MyStr = CStr(TheArray(1, 1)) Note: Always declare it as a forced array not just as Variant … Dim TheArray() As Variant 'Variant array (can only be an array) Dim TheArray As Variant 'Variant (can be a value or array) … to ensure it contains an array. Otherwise it will contain only a value if you do TheArray ...


1

The (last) line you read is not fLine, that is a slice of all lines. The last line is returned by FileScanner.Text(). If you want to split the last line, either store that in a variable, or use the last element of the slice. If you choose to store it in a variable: line := FileScanner.Text() fLine = append(fLine, line) splitline := strings.SplitAfterN(...


1

Use the following approach for two different version string formats (it also covers single/double quotes): def update_version_strings(file_path, new_version): version_regex = re.compile(r"(^_*?version_*?\s*=\s*['\"])(\d+\.\d+\.\d+)") with open(file_path, "r+") as f: content = f.read() f.seek(0) f.write( re.sub( ...


1

In Javascript, it needs to be done by using \n. var foo = "Bob\nis\ncool."; tooltip = "User is already present.\n"+ props.email;


1

You can cast it into the right sized character pointer and just simple assign it: procedure getMemoryStreamAsaString( aMS_ : TMemoryStream ); var ws : widestring; // in newer Delphi it can be string ans : ansistring; begin ws := pwidechar( aMS_.memory ); // OR ans := pansichar( aMS_.memory ); end;


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