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Yes, LSTMs are a viable option here. In keras this would surmount to setting the field called "stateful" to true. What this does is to not reset the internal state of the cells between each sample, meaning that it would keep remembering the previous step(s) until this cell is reset. In this case, you would simply set the LSTM stateful to true, hand it one ...


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The above error is mainly caused when you are trying to use TensorFlow 1.x but the system is running tensor 2.0. Initialise the TensorFlow using the code below to ensure you are trying to use the version 1.0 import tensorflow.compat.v1 as tf You can make the system disable that behaviour by the below command after the initialisers. tf....


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So to reiterate what you want, you have a dataset with 5 features in total. And you need to use the first three features as inputs and the last two as targets. Here's what needs to changed to achieve that. import tensorflow as tf from tensorflow import keras import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import pandas as pd from sklearn....


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numClasses is exactly number of classes in your training dataset. This value defines the length of one-hot vectors. Let's see an example: Assume that y = [1,2,0,0] are labels for 4 examples. The one-hot representation converts one dimensional array of labels into 2-D array of the shape (number_of_examples, numClasses). Y contains 4 examples and 3 unique ...


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So I eventually found how to perform a 2D convolution using just Eigen tensor function calls, without needing any loops. The code that helped me get here was the Tensorflow eigen_spatial_convolutions.h file @jdehesa linked me to. The lines I linked to have the eigen code required to do a Conv2D operation on both row-major and col-major data so you'll ...


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Assign the fit() call in Keras to a variable so you can track the metrics through the epochs. history = model.fit(tr_x, ... It will return a dictionary, access it like this: loss_hist = history.history['loss'] And then get the min(), max(), or whatever you want. np.min(loss_hist)


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I solved installing in google colab !pip install tensorflow-gpu and !pip install tf-nightly So now tf.test.gpu_device_name(), the output is /device:GPU:0 But, TensorFlow automatically upgrade its version to 2.1.0-dev20191120


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I have not looked if they removed or moved the default writer. But you can create your own writer and it will show up as a text summary in the Tensorboard. Since TF2.0 defaults to Eager mode, no need for session. dir_name = os.path.join("your_log_dir", "Text Summary") writer = tf.summary.create_file_writer(logdir=dir_name) with writer.as_default(): tf....


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The object detection API configuration files have protobuf format. Here's roughly how you can read them, edit and save. import tensorflow as tf from google.protobuf import text_format from object_detection.protos import pipeline_pb2 pipeline = pipeline_pb2.TrainEvalPipelineConfig() ...


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TensorFlow is a mid-level framework that performs operations on tensors. Keras is a high-level API that simplifies the creation and training of neural networks. Keras doesn't do any of the tensor ops itself; it delegates those to its backend, which is a mid-level framework of your choosing: TensorFlow, CNTK, or Theano. Each of those frameworks can be ...


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You don't have access to this information by default, but you can give a Callback whatever attributes you want to by passing them to the constructor. For example, if you're using a generator (with data stored in the generator.y attribute): class LossHistory(keras.callbacks.Callback): def __init__(self, data_generator, **kwargs): self.generator =...


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Just wanted to add that this can be done for datasets where each element is a dictionary as well. For example, if one element of the input dataset looks like { 'feat1': [2,4], 'feat2': [3]} And for each element you want to split into to elements based on the elements in feat1, you could write: def split(element): dict_of_new_elements = { '...


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Keras is expecting the number of attributes or variables of X in the input layer, but you defined your input layer as model.add(Dense(7, input_shape = x.shape, activation='relu')) #Hidden layer 1 So, that means that there will be 7 hidden units in the input layer, which should not be true, because you only have 1 variable in X. Try doing: model.add(Dense(...


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Add this line trainY = to_categorical(trainY, 2) after this line testY = to_categorical(testY, 2). And change your last layer to model.add(Dense(2, activation="softmax")), because it's supposed to match a 2D matrix like your target. Also, make sure your loss function is categorical_crossentropy, if it isn't already.


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You have three Input layers in your code. You have added only two layers in your model input. # Output Memory Representation. input_story_11 = layers.Input(shape=(story_maxlen,), dtype='int32') This layer is not added to model inputs. Hence it is giving graph disconnected error. Add this layer to your inputs: model = Model(inputs=[input_story, ...


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Axes mean the axis of your tensors. For examples, in your case, you have a tensor of shape=(None,552,64) which is 3D(rank 3) tensor. A scalar(e.g 3) is 0D tensor. A vector ([1,2,3]) is 1D tensor: A matrix ([ is 2D tensor. and so on. [1,2], [2,3], ] the first axis( axis 0) is the one that has None. The second axis( axis 1 ...


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