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Display a dialog with a “please wait” message. Then iterate through the extension context’s inputItems twice: once just to count the number of files we want to process and then again to actually process them. When the number of files processed is equal to the number we expected, we call another instance method to hide the dialog and return control to the ...


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This is really interesting to explore - you may go with making dumps and exploring them with WInDbg. But I would consider creating the same application as Console Application and exploring its behavior. It may turn out it was some kind GUI related bug/feature where you reached maybe Handlers/GDI limit or something like this.


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Based on the various docs I've read, instances of scoped services are only ever accessed by one thread at a time (the thread processing the request). That's not exactly correct. When you await an operation, the thread is returned to the thread pool and when the async operation resumes, one free thread from the thread pool will be picked up. Its not ...


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So is it always safe to create a static final Object of whatever class it is pointing to if it has no fields? I would dare to say yes. Having no fields makes a class stateless and, thus, immutable, which is always desirable in a multithreading environment. Stateless objects are always thread-safe. Immutable objects are always thread-safe. An excerpt ...


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So is it always safe to create a static final Object of whatever class it is pointing to if it has no fields? "Always" is too strong a claim. It's easy to construct an artificial class where instances are not thread-safe despite having no fields: public class NotThreadSafe { private static final class MapHolder { private static final Map<...


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YES. It is safe to create a static final object of a class if it has no fields. Here, the Comparator provides functionality only, through its compare(String, String) method. In case of multithreading, the compare method will have to deal with local variables only (b/c it is from stateless class), and local variables are not shared b/w thread, i.e., each ...


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XYZComparator is stateless, it has no fields. hence all instances of the class are functionally equivalent. Thus it should be a singleton to save on unnecessary object creation. From that point of view, the "current day" answer is probably: make MyComparator an enum. The JVM guarantees that MyComparatorEnum.INSTANCE will be a true singelton, and you don't ...


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Explanation So is it always safe to create a static final Object of whatever class it is pointing to if it has no fields? Depends. Multi-threading issues can only occur when one thread is changing something while another thread is using it at the same time. Since the other thread might then not be aware of the changes due to caching and other effects. Or ...


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Calling the compare method from two threads in parallel is safe (stack confinement). The parameters you pass to the method are stored in that thread's stack, that any other thread cannot access. An immutable singleton is always recommended. Abstain from creating mutable singletons, as they introduce global state in your application, that is bad. Edit: If ...


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Multithreading issues are caused by unwanted changes in state. If there is no state that is changed, there are no such issues. That is also why immutable objects are very convenient in a multithreaded environment. In this particular case, the method only operates on the input parameters s1 and s2 and no state is kept.


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This is a attempted improvement on Eser's answer (Version2). The Lazy class is thread safe by default, so the lock can be removed. It is possible that multiple Lazy objects will be created for a given key, but only one will have it's Value property queried, causing the starting of the heavy Task. The other Lazys will remain unused, and will fall out of scope ...


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I think so. As said as a comment on this other question: multiprocessing: How do I share a dict among multiple processes? Is manager.dict() this process safe? @LorenzoBelli, if you're asking whether access to the manager is synchronized, I believe the answer is yes. multiprocessing.Manager() returns an instance of SyncManager, the name of which ...


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Is Logrus Thread-safe? Yes: Thread safety By default, Logger is protected by a mutex for concurrent writes. Except when it isn't. Most of the non-thread-safe cases are bugs which will occur only in rare situations. Whether any of them matter to you depends, of course, on your use case.


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Look at the ExecutorService. For example, it might look like this: public void myMethod() { ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(1000); List<Callable<Boolean>> callableList = new ArrayList<Callable<Boolean>>(); // any list for init our threads for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) ...


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try this import java.awt.Component; import java.awt.event.ActionListener; import javax.swing.JButton; import javax.swing.JFrame; public class main { private static JFrame frame; private static JButton button; main(){ frame = new JFrame(); button = new JButton("Click"); button.setBounds(20,20,2,2); button.addActionListener(multi(frame)); ...


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This code isn't great for a number of reasons, but it does show you a way to create 1,000 threads: for (int n = 0; n < 1000; n++) { new Thread("thread " + n).start(); }


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Depends... If you did not override the start()-method of java's Thread, your code will cause an exception. If you did override the start()-method and your start()-method calls run() on the ThreadClass object, then your code will execute but only on one thread (the main thread). To create 10000 threads, you will have to create each of them with new Thread()...


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ThreadClass function = new ThreadClass(); Given your comment, I think we can treat ThreadClass as "almost the same" as Thread here. And then, your code creates a single thread object. On which you then call start() many many times. Which is, simply not "valid" (see here for example). So, from that point of view: your code creates a single thread, and then ...


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ReentrantReadWriteLock can provide higher performance when the read operations are more than write operations by controlling the AbstractQueuedSynchronizer$state carefully. If not, the overhead of controlling is higher than ReentrantLock. For your first example, it is right that you don't need to consider the atomicity problem for getCounter() method ,but ...


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The classic approach would be to use a Lock to guard access to the object. That is, any time any thread wants to read or write the state of the shared object, the thread should first acquire() a Lock that you have created to guard that object. Then the thread can do whatever it wants to the object, and when it's done, it should release() the Lock so that ...


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#include <iostream> #include <thread> #include <mutex> std::mutex mu; unsigned int change = 0; void printConsecutiveNumbers(int start, int end,unsigned int consecutive) { int x = start; while (x < end) { //each thread has check there time is coming or not if (change % consecutive == start) { ...


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You isPaused is not a volatile variable, so JVM does not guarantee that most updated value will be shared between thread. Using volatile variables reduces the risk of memory consistency errors because any write to a volatile variable establishes a happens-before relationship with subsequent reads of that same variable Change isPaused to a volatile static ...


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Thread-safety is not enough if you run multiple processes: Even though collections.deque is thread-safe: Deques support thread-safe, memory efficient appends and pops from either side of the deque with approximately the same O(1) performance in either direction. Source: https://docs.python.org/3/library/collections.html#collections.deque Depending on ...


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Using ReentrantLock or ReentrantReadWriteLock depends on the use case you like to solve. At your first example there is no lock at the getCounter() method. So getting the counter is possible while a thread holds the ReentrantLock at the increment method. At your second example you can't get the counter while a thread holds the writeLock() at the increment ...


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The accepted answer is imprecise and incorrect in the worst case . If changes are made during ToList(), you can still end up with an error. Besides lock, which performance and thread-safety needs to be taken into consideration if you have a public member, a proper solution can be using immutable types. In general, an immutable type means that you can't ...


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No matter if there is one object or several, it is a good idea to store the mutex together with the opaque object. First of all, the mutex and the data it protects belong together. But also, thread-safety needs to be dealt with by your "ADT" and not by the caller. Access to objects should only occur through setters/getters, which will handle thread-safety ...


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It depends on what you want to achieve. Sometimes you want interior thread safety, sometimes exterior. Typically, the decision will depend on whether an external user needs to compose operations or not. Say, they want both f() and g() to happen atomically. If you hide the mutex inside Object, there is no way they can achieve that without managing another ...


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There is a gap between the load if (m_count<1) and the call to fetch_sub(). Say m_count == 1 and a thread executes the load and proceeds, but before it executes fetch_sub(), a second thread executes the load and gets the same value (1). Now both threads will execute fetch_sub() and m_count becomes -1. To eliminate this gap, you can combine the ...


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This answer is based on the assumption that rules and results are shared or singleton instances and that the following code is called in parallel: MatchResultsForRules(rules, results); ApplyRules(rules); MatchResultsForRules() edits your searchResults via rule.searchResults.Add(res). Then you might have a short time gap before ApplyRules() iterates throuh ...


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This does very much look like a threading problem (that address 0x8000000000000000 is very suspect), so you could serialise writes in the same way you have reads: DispatchQueue.main.async { //This needs to run on the UI Thread, since it also loops over Meal.menus if let date = date { KEY_Q.sync { Meal.menus[...


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You can use this: var mDel = (RoutedEventHandler)delegate { clicked(a2, null); }; bxBox[z].Click += mDel ; ... bxBox[z].Click -= mDel ;


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I ended up using this aproach after searching more on thread safe. I hope it will works well in all scenarios: ConcurrentQueue<MethodToExecute> threadSafeQueue = new ConcurrentQueue<MethodToExecute>(); private void Update() { if (threadSafeQueue.Count > 0) { MethodToExecute changeUI; ...


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atomic::compare_exchange_* loads the current value into the 'expected' parameter if the comparison fails. In your example, in step 4 T1 would fail the compare-exchange and load 25 into oldValue, and then would succeed on the next iteration.


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Your query can be answered in 2 parts, because there are 2 questions in your query : 1) Referring to Oracle's tutorial documentation for Atomic variables : https://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/concurrency/atomicvars.html The java.util.concurrent.atomic package defines classes that support atomic operations on single variables. All classes ...


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The key is fault tolerance. Unless you gate the logic using a semaphore (lock) to allow only one operation at a time (which is obviously going to hinder performance), then there is no way to ensure that multiple simultaneous operations are not going to happen for the same user. Instead, you need to focus on planning for that, and having a strategy to handle ...


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[Do] I need to wrap isObjectActive() in a the synchronized block...? No. Synchronization isn't for methods, it's for data. In the example shown above, you can remove the synchronized block from isObjectActive(), because that function does not directly access the state variable, and the only other function that it calls does use synchronization when ...


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Latest update 2019, If you are searching for new ways of implementing synchronization in JAVA, this answer is for you. I found this amazing blog by Anatoliy Korovin this will help you understand the syncronized deeply. How to Synchronize Blocks by the Value of the Object in Java. This helped me hope new developers will find this useful too.


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private static final ObjectMapper jsonMapper = new ObjectMapper(); Constructing an ObjectMapper instance is a relatively expensive operation, so it's recommended to create one object and reuse it. You did it right making it final. // Suggestion 1: public static <T> T toObject1(final Class<T> type, final String json) throws IOException { ...


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About concurrency ObjectMapper versus ObjectReader is not relevant here. The ObjectReader doesn't look to be helpful for your scenario. Its specification says : Builder object that can be used for per-serialization configuration of deserialization parameters, such as root type to use or object to update (instead of constructing new instance). ...


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As I mention in the comment, I have always used suggestion #1. I have no knowledge if there is difference between the options in terms of thread safety/performance or at all. However, this approach will not work if the target type is itself parameterized with generic type. The most obvious usage is some collection: Json.toObject1(List.class, str); // ...


0

Imagine you want to wait for something to happen. Since that something has to happen in another thread (since this thread is waiting) it has to be protected in some way to avoid race conditions. Imagine you use the following code: Acquire a lock. Check if the thing you want to wait for has happened. If it has, stop, you're done. If it hasn't, wait. Oops. ...


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First of all, wait condition needs a mutex, so you gotta give it one. That's what a wait condition is. It is the most low level signalling mechanism between threads in multi-threading, so it doesn't provide the "convenience" you seem to be looking for. But you also need the mutex to get things work right. A wait condition might have a spurious wakeup, that ...


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You need a mutex. Essentially the only thing the GIL protects you from is accessing uninitialized memory. If something in Ruby could be well-defined without being atomic, you should not assume it is atomic. A simple example to show that your example ordering is possible. I get the "double set" message every time I run it: $global = nil $thread = nil ...


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This is an easy one. You created a Counter called c1; You made a Runnable from this counter; You passed this same runnable to two threads. Two threads will now be operating on the same Counter object c1; You run the while-loop inside the add() method. The add() method prints something on one line and on next line it increments i. In the case of your ...


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There are two concurrency issues with your code. The shared int i is neither appropriately declared nor accessed for concurrent tasks. It need to be at least volatile but in order to correctly handle an atomic increment should be an AtomicInteger. Volatile would help guarantee that other threads can see if the value changes (which is not otherwise ...


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The problem is that you are accessing to the variable i concurrently. Java caches the variables in the CPU cache. Since every Thread can be executed in different cores the value of i could be different in each Thread. Even when you are executing i++ the underlaying code is i = i + 1. You are reading the the variable, then you are writing, so multiple ...


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What you have just discovered is a race-condition (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Race_condition) The threads can access the counter-object without any restrictions. Even if i is an int, there is no guarantee that, for example, 't1' is finished incrementing the value when 't2' reads it. Try running the program a couple of times, the output will probably ...


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I think it's important to understand what the purpose of volatile is. On a multi-processor system with multiple levels of cache an update to a variable can take some time to reach main memory and hence other threads depending on latency and the hardware design. The code basically is supposed to demo this happening, the change to the running variable is ...


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Because it makes no sense and doesn't serve the purpose of a mutex. Lets say you could send a mutex by value (i.e. mutex had a copy constructor). A copy is passed and mutex is locked... its the copy that is locked. There's no guarantee that you are preventing race conditions. Thus, copy constructor is not present and it can't be send by value.


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If I pass mutex object to worker() without reference, it causes compile error That's because std::mutex is a non-copyable class. Why is mutex implemented to be passed to functions using references? There is no reason to pass an object of std::mutex by value (and therefore copying it) as a mutex should be used for mutual exclusion to prevent race ...


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