6

From sleep_for documentation, you can see that: Blocks the execution of the current thread for at least the specified sleep_duration. This function may block for longer than sleep_duration due to scheduling or resource contention delays. The most likely cause is that your process scheduler kicks out the sleeping thread and doesn't reschedule it for a ...


5

Let's first check what guarantees the specification gives you (quotes from the latest daft of the C++ standard): [thread.req.timing] Implementations necessarily have some delay in returning from a timeout. Any overhead in interrupt response, function return, and scheduling induces a “quality of implementation” delay, expressed as duration Di. ...


5

If you change a variable in one thread it not immediately (or necessary ever) visible to a 2nd thread unless you use some kind of synchronization primitive like a Mutex. You can also use the atomic classes like AtomicInteger to ensure changes made in one thread become visible to the other. There's a lot more information available in the documentation.


3

A more 'canonical' way to tackle this problem in .Net is using the Task Parallel Library instead of manually controlling threads. The console program below illustrates how you would run 6 threads on background threads, with a one second delay between them. class Program { public async static Task Main() { var cts = new CancellationTokenSource(...


3

Two possible scenarios Thread 2 would have updated x before Thread 1. You cannot determine how the execution interleaved between the two threads based on the order of the print statements you are seeing. The threads indeed executed in the order you expect. But since x is not volatile you might not see the updated value. See - What is the volatile keyword ...


3

Can someone please explain to me what I am missing What you are missing is memory synchronization between the threads. When you start your 2 background threads, they have their own local memory (on their own CPUs) and you need to specifically update any shared data between them. What is complicating the code is that System.out.println(...) is a ...


3

You are starting Thread2 before calling the join() on thread1. That is why your both threads are basically running simultaneously and your join is not affecting the run() of any other the 2 threads. Try to change your start and join calling code to something like this; try{ thread1.start(); thread1.join(); thread2.start(); } You shouldn't need ...


3

You've got the question you asked covered by the other answers, but you also asked a question in the comments: Is there any simple method can ensure i sleep for 1us? Instead of calling sleep_for, yielding the thread's execution slot, you could busy-sleep. That is, loop until a certain amount of time has passed. It'll often get more accurate results at ...


3

It’s worth pointing out first, how CompletableFuture work (or why it is named like it is): CompletableFuture<?> f = CompletableFuture.supplyAsync(supplier, executionService); is basically equivalent to CompletableFuture<?> f = new CompletableFuture<>(); executionService.execute(() -> { if(!f.isDone()) { try { f....


2

Kindly check below code, You cannot able to finish activity before starting new one. new Handler().postDelayed(new Runnable() { @Override public void run() { Intent intenr = new Intent(SplashActivity.this, MainActivity.class); startActivity(intenr); finish(); ...


2

Inspired by Straight Fast’s answer I evaluated the effects of timer_slack_ns and of SCHED_FIFO. For timer_slack_ns you have to add #include <sys/prctl.h> // prctl ⋮ prctl (PR_SET_TIMERSLACK, 10000U, 0, 0, 0); meaning that for the current process the timer slack shall be set to 10µs instead of the default value of 50µs. The effect is a better ...


2

This is indeed a stunning bug, fixed in GCC 10 (bug 41861 describes it in the context of <condition_variable>). Back in the day when I encountered this, it was tempting to fall back on Boost to get the proper behaviour, but even that was broken until 1.61. And nowadays it would be strange to mix Boost and standard timing/threading code anyway, since ...


2

If you are using the latest C# 8.0 you could use an IAsyncEnumerable to give you the items as you need them: private async IAsyncEnumerable<Item> GetItemAfterDelay(IEnumerable<Item> items) { DateTime previousItemTimestamp = items.First().Timestamp; foreach(var i in items) { var delay = i.Timestamp - previousItemTimestamp; ...


2

If you want thread2 to start after thread1 terminates, then of-course you can simply wait for thread1 to terminate and then launch thread2. But then, what is the point of using threads? If you want to launch thread1 and thread2 at the same time and still have thread2 wait until thread1 terminates, you can use one of Java's many concurrency utilities, such ...


2

There are two issues with using time.Sleep in the way you envision, one major and one minor. You have no way to terminate the goroutine The goroutine is stuck in an infinite loop, so unless doJob panics, it will never terminate. You should probably pass it a channel that will be closed when the goroutine needs to terminate: done := make(chan struct{}) go ...


2

The JavaFX Application Thread runs as a loop. Effectively (the actual implementation details are far more complex) that loop does the following (in pseudocode): while (applicationIsRunning()) { if (thereAreEventsToHandle()) { handleEvents(); } if (thereAreAnimationsToUpdate()) { updateAnimations(); } if (...


2

You cannot predict the result of threading. It may be different if you run your code on another device or just multiple times. You cannot (or should not) rely on timing or the scheduler. I think that concurrency/non-volatility itself may not be the only problem but flushing is also something you may want to take into consideration: x=3 (ThreadExample(1)) ...


2

There is no easy way for doing this. You have several options. The easiest one would be to make the REQUEST_STATUS_CHECK_INTERVAL configurable and configure it to 0 in tests. It can be a property of the tested class. sleep(ofSeconds(getSleepInternval())); In the test would wold call testedObject.setSleepInterval(0); Second option would be to extract the ...


2

Welcome to StackOverflow & Go development! Go currency is powerful - but also very hard to master. Don't get discouraged! Issues: while the other functions employ sync locking - the execute() function does not - leading to the bulk of the data-race conditions to compile a data-race version go build --race and standard error will show where concurrent ...


1

I assume that unity is playing the audio after it stops sleeping? In which case why not simply use coroutines? Something like: public void OnMouseDown(){ { CheckAnswer(); } public void CheckAnswer(); { if (Correct == true) { audioo = this.gameObject.GetComponent<AudioSource>(); ...


1

Audio playing happens on the main thread (Unity is mostly single-threaded) and your code makes current (currently main) thread to sleep, therefore audio doesn't get played until thread awakes from sleep. To solve this, you might want to consider using Unity coroutines. Start the coroutine which would yield return new WaitForSeconds(5); and then start next ...


1

All Thread.currentThread().interrupt() does is update the value of field interrupted to true. Let's see the program's flow and how the interrupted field is assigned values: public class Main { public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException { SleepTest sleepTest = new SleepTest(); Thread ...


1

The way you are trying to make an animation is fundamentally wrong, unfortunately. For the right way to make an animation, you need to store the current state of the animation in some way, and make paintComponent use the state of the animation when it's painting. In this case you're animating only the appearance of the text WILLKOMMEN, so the state you need ...


1

Will there be 3 threads running concurrently? Yes. The first thread is the main thread, the one which started it all, the one which invoked your public static void main (String args []) method. All code runs on a thread. Your main method then starts 2 threads. Since you started with 1, you now have 3. As for why the final output from the main thread is ...


1

Variables are not recommended way to exchange information between threads. Use BlockingQueues for messages, Semaphores and CountDownLatches for signals. In short, transfer of a value must not only make silent assignment, but also create some kind of event, to notify other threads. I like word "token" for such objects.


1

i switched to using spin_sleep::sleep(i) from https://crates.io/crates/spin_sleep and it seems to have fixed it. i guess it must just be windows inaccuracies then...still strange that time::sleep on windows would be that far off for something as simple as a game loop


1

You can use a scheduled executor service. ScheduledExecutorService ses = Executors.newSingleThreadScheduledExecutor(); private void containtRefresher(){ int delay = 100; // in milliseconds Runnable taskPerformer = () -> { Executor.getBestFlipProfit(); String res = "<html>"; for (String key: Executor....


1

You could transform this for loop to an iterator first, taking out of the loop common elements: val formatter = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss") // be careful because SimpledateFormat is not threads safe val iter: Iterator[Unit] = Iterator.continually { val line = FileStream.getLines val today = Calendar.getInstance.getTime val key = UUID....


1

The key is to measure the elapsed time from the first item you send, then ensure that no item is processed early. Since other factors outside your control could cause processing delays. (assuming c#8); private async IAsyncEnumerable<Item> GetItemAfterDelay(IEnumerable<Item> items) { var e = items.GetEnumerator(); if (e.MoveNext()){ ...


1

Here is your answer in kotlin : Handler().postDelayed({ val mIntent = Intent(this@SplashActivity, MainActivity::class.java) startActivity(mIntent) finish() }, 2000)


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