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5

You can align them by shifting the inlays to some anchor of the embedding picture, e.g. shift={(scopeAouter.north)}. I also would not nest these local bounding boxes. \documentclass[crop,tikz]{standalone} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture}[x=0.04cm,y=-0.04cm] \begin{scope}[xshift=0, yshift=0, local bounding box=scopeAouter] \fill [black!...


2

Altering the shapes of the child nodes is easy, you could simply use regular polygon, regular polygon sides=6 from the shapes library. However altering the connections between the root node and the hexagones is more difficult (at least for us mere mortals, tikz wizards can do it, see https://tex.stackexchange.com/a/514772/36296). Instead you could emulate ...


2

With the positioning library of tikz, you could create a dummy node below A at whatever distance you like and then draw the edge from this dummy node to A \documentclass{article} \usepackage{tikz-network} \usetikzlibrary{positioning} \begin{document} \begin{tikzpicture} \Vertex[x=0,label=1, size=1.2]{A} \Vertex[x=3,size=1.2,label=2]{B} \Vertex[x=6,size=1....


1

You can simply add nodes to paths. This can be done with either \draw (x) -- (y) node [midway] {w} ; if you use the standard syntax for drawing edges. or with \draw (x) -- to node[] {w} (y) ; if you prefer the 'to' form. Normal position of the node is the exact middle of the line, but you can add any parameter to tweak the position of the node (left,...


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