Hot answers tagged

9

You can have: vector< pair<int, string> > which always stores an int and a string for each vector member, see std::pair vector< variant<int, string> > , which is a tagged variant that stores either an int or a string for each vector element, but can't be empty (although you can put a third type in the list to represent emptiness), ...


7

Firstly, as mentioned, this: Matrix(size_t x, size_t y) { a(x, vector<int>(y , 0 )); } is not how you initialise a member. To initialise a member, we use the member initializer list, like so: Matrix(size_t x, size_t y) : a(x, vector<int>(y , 0 )) {} The colonic syntax is a specific place for listing initialisations. Nothing in the ...


6

In C++, ranges are marked by a pair of iterators marking the beginning of the range and a position one past the end of the range. For containers, the begin() and end() member functions provide you with a pair of iterators to the first and past-the-end positions. It’s not safe to read from end(), since it doesn’t point to an actual element. Similarly, the ...


5

int maxbooks=100; vector <book> minilibrary(maxbooks); these lines created vector with 100 books, each book was created by default constructor. Now, when you add new book into vector, its size is 101, but displayLibrary takes 1 as the number of books to be printed, and you print minilibrary[0] - defaulted book, not the book you added i.e. minilibrary[...


3

If I understand you correctly and you want to loop over entire vectors instead of vector elements, you can put your vectors into a list and then loop over the list. Like so: x <- c(1:10) y <- c(11:20) for (item in list(x, y)) { # your code } Edit (after your clarification): If you want to turn both vectors into data.frames this is equally ...


3

You wrote mSectionsSubsets[i] with i from 0 to count. Every single one of those accesses is illegal, because mSectionsSubsets has no elements in it. Reserving capacity, and resizing the vector, are two different things. In this particular case, perhaps: mSectionsSubsets.resize(count); for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) { mSectionsSubsets[i].reserve(...


3

Use Map Map(c, list1, vector1) #[[1]] #[1] 1 2 3 #[[2]] #[1] 4 5 6 #[[3]] #[1] 7 8 9 Or lapply lapply(seq_along(list1), function(x) c(list1[[x]], vector1[[x]])) The equivalent purrr variants can be purrr::map2(list1, vector1, c) purrr::map(seq_along(list1), ~c(list1[[.]], vector1[[.]])) data list1 <- list(c(1,2),c(4,5),c(7,8)) vector1 <- c(3,...


3

Does there exist a data structure in cpp that easily provides a way to build a new one, based on an instance that already exists? Pretty much all standard containers are copyable. You can implement your example using std::array: std::array a{0,1,2}; std::array b = a; b[2] = 0;


3

Dereferencing end() or rend() has undefined behaviour. begin() points to the first element, rbegin() points to the last element. end() (in most cases) points to one after the last element and rend() effectively points to one before the first element (though it isn't implemented like that).


3

What is the difference between begin () and rend ()? begin returns an iterator to the first element of the container. rend returns a reverse iterator to one before the first element of the container (which is one past the last element in the reverse iterator range). *v1.rend() The behaviour of indirecting through the rend iterator is undefined (same goes ...


3

When the control is passed to the body of the constructor then the vector is already created. So this statement a(x, vector<int>(y , 0 )); is not a call of a vector constructor. The vector was already created using the default constructor and the statement above is invalid. You could use a mem-initializer list in the constructor class Matrix { ...


3

iterator erase (const_iterator position); iterator erase (const_iterator first, const_iterator last); There is no erase function that takes an int And since this doesnt seem to be a homework, there is no point in writing your own find(). Use this: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/algorithm/find/ Here is a minimal example of how it works #include <...


3

Correct syntax is using initializer list: Matrix(size_t x, size_t y) :a(x, vector<int>(y , 0 )) { }


3

The STL containers (including vector) all hold collection of elements of a single type. vector<int> holds ints, vector<string> holds strings. You can declare your own struct that holds an int and a string, and make a vector of those: struct Foo { int i; string s; }; vector<Foo> v; or use std::pair: vector<pair<int, string> > ...


3

The anObj variable should be of type std::unique_ptr<Foo> and not a Foo*. Code should be: std::unique_ptr<Foo>& anObj{ myVec[ 0 ] }; Or Foo* anObj{ myVec[ 0 ].get( ) };


3

From this erase reference: Invalidates iterators and references at or after the point of the erase [Emphasis mine] That means the iterator you pass to erase will itself be invalidated, and it can no longer be used. You need to use the iterator that erase returns: it = MyVector.erase(it);


2

For starters this loop for (int i = MyVector.size() - 1; i > 0; ++i) ^^^ does not make sense. At least you should write for (int i = MyVector.size() - 1; i > 0; --i) ^^^ After using the method erase current iterator it becames invalid. You could use reverse ...


2

Use a std::tuple. vector<tuple<int,string>>


2

reserve doesn't set the size, it sets the capacity (i.e. it's more concerned with memory management). In your case mSectionsSubsets still has a zero size after mSectionsSubsets.reserve(count);. Use resize to set the size of a vector. Note that using .at rather than [] is safer insofar that in the former case, a runtime exception will be thrown, rather than ...


2

(map f xs) always returns something. It's impossible not to. If you think it doesn't, there's something wrong with how you're measuring, not with your map call. Include more code about the structure of your program, not just this one snippet.


2

map does return in this case (map (fn [coord] coord) [{:x 1, :y 0} {:x 0, :y 1}]) ;; => ({:x 1, :y 0} {:x 0, :y 1}) Note that in this case: (map (fn [coord] (println (get coord :x))) [{:x 1, :y 0} {:x 0, :y 1}]) It will first print 1 and then 0 and then return (nil nil) because println returns nil. Furthermore, if you want access to the x and y you ...


2

Because vector<book> minilibrary(maxbooks); creates minilibrary with 100 elements already inserted. Then you try to display them, but you are using different counter for amount of inserted elements num_of_books. So for example you add one book, now you've 101 books, you print one book (first), which is empty. While the book added is at index 100 (after ...


2

Use std::sort and write a Compare functor for each of your cases. If you need to combine multiple fields, use std::tie. Here's an example. You don't need to make the sorting functions static members like I've done here but it makes it possible to use std::tie with private members. #include <algorithm> #include <iostream> #include <vector> ...


2

boost.multiindex should be very useful.


2

vector::rend() is a built-in function in the C++ standard library which returns a reverse iterator pointing to the theoretical element right before the first element in the array container. but vector::begin() returns an iterator pointing to the first element in the vector. See this code : for (auto it = v1.rbegin(); it != v1.rend(); it++) cout <&...


1

You could use Map and pass x and y as list argument and characters "x" and "y" as another argument. This will give you list of two separate dataframes Map(function(x, y) data.frame(x, y = as.integer(y == "x")), list(x, y), c("x", "y")) #[[1]] # x y #1 1 1 #2 2 1 #[[2]] # x y #1 3 0 #2 4 0 Or Maybe only with lapply lst <- list(x = x, y = y) lapply(...


1

It is probably due to the settings of your Debug Configurations in CodeWarrior. In Debugger tab, if Initialized program counter at is ticked as shown below, the debugger will give Program Counter, at reset, the address of "the top of the boot.S file", which is the Program entry point. The normal sequence of finding the vector table is skipped. Your program ...


1

Vectors are similar to arrays but the difference is they can be dynamically resized. That is why, unlike arrays, you can initialize a vector without specifying its maxlimit (in your case- maxbooks) Please refer to the documentation on how to initialize a vector in various ways.


1

Neither a vector of unique_ptr's nor a vector of plain pointers are the preferred way to store data. In your example: std::vector<MyObject> is usually just fine, and if you know the size at compile time, try std::array<int>. If you absolutely need indirect references , you can also consider std::vector<std::reference_wrapper<MyObject>&...


1

Why isn't vector of pointer with "custom deleter", if such a thing exists Because such a thing doesn't exist and cannot exist. The allocator supplied to a container exists to allocate memory for the container and (optionally) creates/destroys the objects in that container. A vector<T*> is a container of pointers; therefore, the allocator allocates ...


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