New answers tagged

4

As mentioned in the comments, the algorithms you use return iterators that need to be dereferenced. For this task, you should probably look at their companion, std::minmax_element that return iterators to both the min and max element to not have to go through the lists many times: bool canNest(const std::vector<int>& arr1, const std::vector<int&...


0

as Dyukha said in the comments min/max_element return an iterator and you need to dereference them. bool canNest(std::vector<int> arr1, std::vector<int> arr2) { return (*std::min_element(arr1.begin(), arr1.end()) > *std::min_element(arr2.begin(), arr2.end()) && *std::max_element(arr1.begin(), ...


1

You could use protobuf repeated fields: repeated: this field can be repeated any number of times (including zero) in a well-formed message. The order of the repeated values will be preserved. Like: message bool_vec{ repeated bool element = 1; } message bool_vec_vec{ repeated bool_vec element = 1; } message myStruct { ... bool_vec v = 100;...


1

Get the indexes of the even numbers using which ind = which(Virat_Scored %% 2 == 0) Then extract these from the Virat_Scored vector Virat_Scored[ind] [1] 98 102 120 118 200


3

char *dist = new char[10]; This allocates a new char array, and sets dist to point to it. dist = values; // <-- Value is 4.5 The next line immediately replaces the distpointer to the new-ed buffer, leaking this memory. This now sets dist to point to some other buffer (presumably), instead. meas.push_back(dist); This now adds the pointer to the ...


1

In fact you need a container with a variable size to store all entered employees. The more appropriate container in your case is std::vector. Here is a demonstrative program, #include <iostream> #include <string> #include <iterator> #include <vector> struct Employee { std::string name; int age; double salary; }; std::...


1

There is only a single Employee instance in your code. Either merge the two loops into one: for (int i = 0; i < sized; i++) { cout << "Enter Full name of employee: "; cin.ignore(); getline(cin, Emp.name); cout << endl; cout << "Enter age of employee: "; cin >> Emp.age; cout << endl; cout <&...


3

So basically my program outputs the final set of information received Because you only define one instance of Employee: Employee Emp; and then store your input into that single Emp. You want something more like: cout << "Enter the number of employees you want to enter into the database: "; cin >> sized; //Declaring a vector type Employee of ...


0

The unit_vector function should be written as: def unit_vector(vector): return vector / np.linalg.norm(vector) Currently, your function isn't returning anything, so by default it returns None. That is why you get the error about multiplying NoneTypes. Additionally, it calculates a single value, the norm. For a unit vector, you must divide the ...


0

I think the easiest way to make it done is : std::vector<std::vector<int>>v(10,std::vector<int>(11,100)); 10 is the size of the outer or global vector, which is the main one, and 11 is the size of inner vector of type int, and initial values are initialized to 100! That's my first help on stack, i think it helps someone.


0

vector<const A*> apoint(5); Makes a vector and preloads it with 5 const A*s that will be default initialized. That means apoint, before you push_back anything contains 5 null pointers. Since the size is already 5, the apoint.reserve(5); does effectively nothing. This also applies to vector<A> a(5);. This means for(unsigned int i = 0; i<5;...


1

for(const A thisA : a){ apoint.push_back(&thisA); } You push a pointer that is no longer valid on next loop. You need a reference (A&). All that said of course, assuming you really need a vector of pointers (do you?)


3

Just use lambda: void sort_v () { std::sort(v.begin(), v.end(), [this](auto a, auto b) { return key(a, b); }); }


-1

You can either use std::bind: void sort_v () { using std::placeholders; std::sort(v.begin(), v.end(), std::bind( &Class:key, this, _1, _2 ) ); } or use lambda: void sort_v () { std::sort(v.begin(), v.end(), [this]( int x, int y ) { return key( x, y ); ); } to make your method work.


1

Prefer algorithms in the standard library to hand crafted loops as much as possible because: 1) they are more expressive; 2) they are likely to be more efficient. std::reverse(std::begin(arr), std::end(arr)); Just include the 'algorithm' header to use std::reverse.


1

The expression in the subscript operator out.push_back(arr[*i]); ^^^^^^^ does not make sense. You mean out.push_back( *i ); But in any case the function can be written better either like this to create a new reversed vector #include <iostream> #include <vector> #include <iterator> std::vector<int> reverse( ...


7

Try: for(std::vector<int>::reverse_iterator i = arr.rbegin(); i != arr.rend(); ++i) { out.push_back(*i); } Iterator already gives you a value, not an index into a vector.


1

try changing createAdmin into this: void UserManager::createAdmin(Admin admin) { users.push_back( std::make_unique<Admin>(admin) ); } push_back of a vector<T> wants a const T& or (in this case) a T&&


0

Xcode 10.2.1 was showing me the error Implicit instantiation of undefined template 'std::__1::vector<std::__1::basic_string<char>, std::__1::allocator<std::__1::basic_string<char> > >'. #include <iostream> #include <vector> int main(int argc, const char * argv[]) { std::vector<std::string> listRestaurants; .......


5

Your call to gyro_reading/n_readings requires a / operator to be defined between types std::vector<T> and T. Standard vector does not have such an operator. Even if it did, the result would probably be an elementwise divide rather than a sum reduction then divide. The following: #include <iterator> #include <numeric> //... double average =...


2

Use scipy.spatial.distance.pdist: import numpy as np import scipy.spatial.distance vectors = np.array([[1, 3], [2, 4], [3, 5]]) # Compute cosine distance dist = scipy.spatial.distance.pdist(vectors, 'cosine') # Compute angles angle = np.rad2deg(np.arccos(1 - dist)) # Make it into a matrix angle_matrix = scipy.spatial.distance.squareform(angle) print(...


7

The problem is that when you start inserting elements you invalidate any existing iterators to that vector, including the iterators that specify the range you are trying to insert. Simple solution is to copy the slice of the vector you want to insert first. vector<int> tmp(vec.begin() + 2, vec.end() - 4); vec.insert(vec.begin(), tmp.begin(), tmp.end(...


3

vec.insert(vec.begin(),vec.begin()+2,vec.end()-4); Here, you pass to insert the iterators to the container itself. This is not allowed because of iterator invalidation. Per [tab:container.req.seq]: a.insert(p,i,j) Expects: T is Cpp17EmplaceConstructible into X from *i. For vector and deque, T is also Cpp17MoveInsertable into X, ...


1

when we pass vector by value in a function as an argument,it simply creates the copy of vector and no any effect happens on the vector which is defined in main function when we call that particular function. while when we pass vector by reference whatever is written in that particular function, every action will going to perform on the vector which is ...


3

This creates a vector of vectors. The non- default constructor is being called for the vector that contains all other vectors while the default constructor is being called for the n vectors that are being placed inside that vector. http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/vector/vector/vector/


-1

You have infinite recursion in third if statment The correct code if the following: #include<iostream> #include<vector> using namespace std; int binary_return(vector<int> a,int start,int end,int seek) { int mid = (start+end)/2; //cout<<start<<" "<<seek<<" "<<mid; if(end!=start) { if(a[...


1

Your code is not handling the last case correctly and ends up in infinite recursion. This unfortunately in C++ means that anything can happen (you're not guaranteed to get a meaningful error). Add a debug print at the beginning of the function and you'll see in which cases you're entering infinite recursion.


0

Why I am getting segmentation error in this code? cal calls itself with pos-1 but you do dp[pos][mask] before to return if (pos<0), the behavior is undefined when pos is negative (typically your crash) Out of that : What do you want to do with if(mask&(mask-1)==0){ ? adding the parenthesis to show the operator priority you do if(mask&((mask-...


1

Why isn't vector of pointer with "custom deleter", if such a thing exists Because such a thing doesn't exist and cannot exist. The allocator supplied to a container exists to allocate memory for the container and (optionally) creates/destroys the objects in that container. A vector<T*> is a container of pointers; therefore, the allocator allocates ...


1

Neither a vector of unique_ptr's nor a vector of plain pointers are the preferred way to store data. In your example: std::vector<MyObject> is usually just fine, and if you know the size at compile time, try std::array<int>. If you absolutely need indirect references , you can also consider std::vector<std::reference_wrapper<MyObject>&...


-1

One purpose of the rownames could be could be to provide another way for subsetting. Consider the case where you want to subset your first M based on SeptQuiz which is the first rowname. You could do: M <- structure(c(72L, 92L, 81L, 81L, 87L, 76L, 89L, 70L, 70L, 73L, 74L, 75L), .Dim = 4:3, .Dimnames = list(c("SeptQuiz", "Midterm", ...


0

This doesn't solve exactly what you wanted, but I thought I'd give a shot at making a more "rust-way" of doing this as someone who has written rust for a little while. let mut primes = Vec::new(); for e in 2..100 { if primes.iter().all(|p| e % p != 0) { primes.push(e); } } println!("{:?}", primes); I store the primes in a separate vector ...


0

//Get Number to Guess if (numlen == 0) { ... } else { //Fill vector to pick from ... } Within this if else block, you have the following two lines: vector<int> numvct(numlen, 0); and vector<int> numvct(numlen); These lines declare and initialize vectors which pass out of scope when the program leaves their respective if / else blocks. ...


3

What is the difference between begin () and rend ()? begin returns an iterator to the first element of the container. rend returns a reverse iterator to one before the first element of the container (which is one past the last element in the reverse iterator range). *v1.rend() The behaviour of indirecting through the rend iterator is undefined (same goes ...


2

vector::rend() is a built-in function in the C++ standard library which returns a reverse iterator pointing to the theoretical element right before the first element in the array container. but vector::begin() returns an iterator pointing to the first element in the vector. See this code : for (auto it = v1.rbegin(); it != v1.rend(); it++) cout <&...


6

In C++, ranges are marked by a pair of iterators marking the beginning of the range and a position one past the end of the range. For containers, the begin() and end() member functions provide you with a pair of iterators to the first and past-the-end positions. It’s not safe to read from end(), since it doesn’t point to an actual element. Similarly, the ...


3

Dereferencing end() or rend() has undefined behaviour. begin() points to the first element, rbegin() points to the last element. end() (in most cases) points to one after the last element and rend() effectively points to one before the first element (though it isn't implemented like that).


0

The problem is with your condition in the while loop ((cin >> input) && (i<n)). You're reading the next input before you check to see if you've read in enough data. So your first input actually reads six values 4 2 1 5 3 6 the second input reads the next digit, 5, as the number of inputs, then reads those five as 6 2 3 1 7 which will ...


2

It is probably due to the settings of your Debug Configurations in CodeWarrior. In Debugger tab, if Initialized program counter at is ticked as shown below, the debugger will give Program Counter, at reset, the address of "the top of the boot.S file", which is the Program entry point. The normal sequence of finding the vector table is skipped. Your program ...


1

You could use Map and pass x and y as list argument and characters "x" and "y" as another argument. This will give you list of two separate dataframes Map(function(x, y) data.frame(x, y = as.integer(y == "x")), list(x, y), c("x", "y")) #[[1]] # x y #1 1 1 #2 2 1 #[[2]] # x y #1 3 0 #2 4 0 Or Maybe only with lapply lst <- list(x = x, y = y) lapply(...


0

IL /// non-SIMD fallback implementation for 128-bit right-shift (unsigned) /// n: number of bit positions to right-shift a 16-byte memory image. /// Vector(T) argument 'v' is passed by-ref and modified in-situ. /// Layout order of the two 64-bit quads is little-endian. .method public static void SHR(Vector_T<uint64>& v, int32 n) ...


0

Can be done in two lines :) Mat to array uchar * arr = image.isContinuous()? image.data: image.clone().data; uint length = image.total()*image.channels(); Mat to vector cv::Mat flat = image.reshape(1, image.total()*image.channels()); std::vector<uchar> vec = image.isContinuous()? flat : flat.clone(); Both work for any general cv::Mat. Explanation ...


-1

int number = array_list[0]; int mode = number; int count = 1; int countMode = 1; for (int i=1; i<size_of_list; i++) { if (array_list[i] == number) { // count occurrences of the current number count++; if (count > countMode) { countMode = count; // ...


4

If I understand you correctly and you want to loop over entire vectors instead of vector elements, you can put your vectors into a list and then loop over the list. Like so: x <- c(1:10) y <- c(11:20) for (item in list(x, y)) { # your code } Edit (after your clarification): If you want to turn both vectors into data.frames this is equally ...


0

Filter out h<0 rTank = 2:0.5:10; h = 250./(pi*rTank)-1/3*rTank.^2; good_h=h(h>0); good_rTank=rTank(h>0); cost = 2*pi*400*good_rTank.^2 + 2*pi*good_h*300.*good_rTank; plot(good_rTank, cost)


0

So I figured out what I did wrong. As pointed out by @scheff, I had Catalog catalog as an class member for my ShoppingCart. However in my View class I already have an instance of Catalog. I totally lost my train of thought after leaving this project for two weeks hehe, so my bad. So to make sure I get the object from the catalog I modified the addToCart ...


5

int maxbooks=100; vector <book> minilibrary(maxbooks); these lines created vector with 100 books, each book was created by default constructor. Now, when you add new book into vector, its size is 101, but displayLibrary takes 1 as the number of books to be printed, and you print minilibrary[0] - defaulted book, not the book you added i.e. minilibrary[...


2

Because vector<book> minilibrary(maxbooks); creates minilibrary with 100 elements already inserted. Then you try to display them, but you are using different counter for amount of inserted elements num_of_books. So for example you add one book, now you've 101 books, you print one book (first), which is empty. While the book added is at index 100 (after ...


1

Vectors are similar to arrays but the difference is they can be dynamically resized. That is why, unlike arrays, you can initialize a vector without specifying its maxlimit (in your case- maxbooks) Please refer to the documentation on how to initialize a vector in various ways.


3

Does there exist a data structure in cpp that easily provides a way to build a new one, based on an instance that already exists? Pretty much all standard containers are copyable. You can implement your example using std::array: std::array a{0,1,2}; std::array b = a; b[2] = 0;


Top 50 recent answers are included