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2d
comment Required return keyword
(Which means Haskell has no need of a return keyword, freeing it to confuse everybody by giving the name return to a function in the standard library that is almost, but not quite, entirely unlike the return keyword from other languages).
2d
comment Required return keyword
@DaveM And this is typically how you'd write it in a functional language like Haskell that enforces purity. The style if (empty) return Nil; something_else is technically an imperative program, since it relies on a sequence of steps being executed in order. That doesn't make it bad; it's normal Scala idiom to write code that is "imperative locally" like this. But in languages that are stricter about defining a function by giving an expression for its result (rather than a "recipe" for producing a result), the "if with no else" style is impossible.
Aug
20
comment Creating custom data types with constraints
Your suggestion of leaving the data type unconstrained is absolutely the standard way to do it. Someone might even have a use for a differently constrained version of the data type some day (e.g. it might make sense to work with times that are merely addable, or something). If you do need to constrain the data structure itself, then GADTs are the correct way to do it, but be aware that then every single Time value contains a Num instance so functions know which implementation of the Num functions to call.
Aug
19
answered Transducers in Swift
Aug
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
18
comment Are there useful applications for the Divisible Type Class?
@TheSeamau5 Polyvariant is my slightly dumb name for a type constructor that is known to be either a covariant Applicative functor, or a contravariant Divisible functor, but which it is isn't known. Instances only need the Applicative/Divisible instance and a single line declaration.
Aug
18
comment Are there useful applications for the Divisible Type Class?
@TheSeamau5 Basically yes. If you have an f a, an f b, (where f is constrained to implement an Avro type class and a Polyvariant type class), plus a function a -> b -> r, and a function r -> (a, b), then you (thrid party code) can make an f r without needing to choose an implementation of f. This lets you build up a complex Avro schema which can be used as an encoder or decoder (or for reconciliation of different-but-compatible schemas, etc). (The actual approach for Avro is different, because there are record headers and such, but that's the idea).
Aug
18
comment Are there useful applications for the Divisible Type Class?
@TheSeamau5 I'm experimenting with an approach where I'm polymorphic in the functor type, using a type class that requires it to be either Applicative or Divisible. This means user-defined structures require both a combiner function and a splitter function, and work out of the box on all of my several parsers and encoders, plus on any future Avro schema interpreters I write.
Aug
17
comment How to deal with 'losing objects' in functional programming?
The OP seems to be implicitly talking about graph DFS. They also seem to be imagining that this need to track paths is arising out of the limitations of functional programming, rather than being to do with the particular problem they're working on (and that you wouldn't need to track visited nods in a graph DFS implementation in a non-functional language).
Aug
17
answered Are there useful applications for the Divisible Type Class?
Aug
16
comment Understanding Haskell seq
@BillyBadBoy That is the whole point of seq, but lazy/strict is not an all or nothing proposition; data structures can have many fields and be deeply nested, and if you call a fully lazy function while implementing a function it may well make sense to eagerly evaluate parts but not all of such a structure. seq is basically the "minimum unit" of added strictness. There's also a deepseq which does fully evaluate things, but that comes at a cost (traversing the entire structure to check for thunks).
Aug
13
comment Haskell 99 questions #10: strange behaviour of '\' symbol
@id_yulian No, please do ask questions, blunt or otherwise! (After checking for existing ones, etc). I just wanted to make sure that if you'd never seen backslash escapades before you didn't just file this away as a quirk of Haskell, only to be surprised again in some other language.
Aug
13
comment Haskell 99 questions #10: strange behaviour of '\' symbol
@id_yulian The backslash escape convention has been adopted by a very large number of programming languages, so it's not just a Haskell issue.
Aug
6
awarded  Good Question
Aug
1
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
31
revised Is there significance in the order of Haskell function parameters?
deleted 43 characters in body
Jul
31
comment Is there significance in the order of Haskell function parameters?
@luqui Yes, but there are other reasons for their parameter order. div and mod are too related to existing symbology from mathematics (and other programming languages) to want to reverse the order. Plus with infix operator it's pretty much as easy to leave out the first argument as the second.
Jul
31
answered Is there significance in the order of Haskell function parameters?
Jul
27
comment What is Ord type?
Yes, we really need a less clunky term than "type-level thing" for "the things we can use in type expressions, whether or not they could be the types of values". Otherwise shorthand is inevitable. The context-dependency of the word "type" seems to work out fine for experts, but it makes it very difficult to pick this stuff up organically.
Jul
23
revised What is Ord type?
added 807 characters in body