katy lavallee

Software Engineer at O'Reilly Media
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Favorite editor: vim • First computer: an E-Machine named "Procrastinator"
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Position Mar 2017 → Current (1 year, 9 months)
Software Engineer at O'Reilly Media

Working on the platform.

Working on the platform.

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Open source Mar 2012 → Current (6 years, 9 months)

command-line freecell, written in python

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command-line freecell, written in python

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Background
Background

My first exposure to web development was when I learned HTML at Job Corps. It was the last thing I learned there and I had no idea at the time how much it would affect my direction in life.

It was a couple years before I tried it again. My step-dad needed computer help and would never download the software I recommended. So, I burned the software to a disk to mail it to him (it was 2002). I realized that wasn't enough, he wouldn't know what to do with these files. So I used HTML to create an index of the files with details on what they were for and hrefs to each file.

Then, a few months later, a friend's parents needed a website and I said "I know HTML, I can do it". I learned some CSS, Javascript, PHP, and how to use FTP. After getting a couple more clients, I was able to put together a decent resume and got hired as a developer at Farstar.

At Farstar I learned a lot about server maintenance and I learned to work with a team. Eventually Farstar moved from PHP to Python/Django and I learned that too. I also learned about sales and project management, so decided to start my own web development business, Firelight Webware.

Running my own business and not having other developers to lean on accelerated the pace of my learning. I gained confidence and learned I was capable of solving many problems, even if I didn't have much to go on in the beginning. I also figured out that I don't like doing client work, especially when I'm also writing all the contracts and negotiating all the prices. Thankfully Mediocre contacted me out of the blue about a position there...

Working at Mediocre has been the greatest educational leap forward for me. I think there is only one thing I do here that I already knew how to do when I started – use git. I learned node.js (with express and restify) and Mongo on the job. I learned about service-oriented-architecture and scalability. I learned more about Salesforce than I thought possible (it's much bigger than I knew) – I even write Apex code occasionally. And I learned about Pentaho's data integration application. I use all of this knowledge regularly and have fun doing it.

My first exposure to web development was when I learned HTML at Job Corps. It was the last thing I learned there and I had no idea at the time how much it would affect my direction in life.

It was a couple years before I tried it again. My step-dad needed computer help and would never download the software I recommended. So, I burned the software to a disk to mail it to him (it was 2002). I realized that wasn't enough, he wouldn't know what to do with these files. So I used HTML to create an index of the files with details on what they were for and hrefs to each file.

Then, a few months later, a friend's parents needed a website and I said "I know HTML, I can do it". I learned some CSS, Javascript, PHP, and how to use FTP. After getting a couple more clients, I was able to put together a decent resume and got hired as a developer at Farstar.

At Farstar I learned a lot about server maintenance and I learned to work with a team. Eventually Farstar moved from PHP to Python/Django and I learned that too. I also learned about sales and project management, so decided to start my own web development business, Firelight Webware.

Running my own business and not having other developers to lean on accelerated the pace of my learning. I gained confidence and learned I was capable of solving many problems, even if I didn't have much to go on in the beginning. I also figured out that I don't like doing client work, especially when I'm also writing all the contracts and negotiating all the prices. Thankfully Mediocre contacted me out of the blue about a position there...

Working at Mediocre has been the greatest educational leap forward for me. I think there is only one thing I do here that I already knew how to do when I started – use git. I learned node.js (with express and restify) and Mongo on the job. I learned about service-oriented-architecture and scalability. I learned more about Salesforce than I thought possible (it's much bigger than I knew) – I even write Apex code occasionally. And I learned about Pentaho's data integration application. I use all of this knowledge regularly and have fun doing it.

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Position Feb 2014 → Mar 2017 (3 years, 1 month)
Software Development Engineer at Mediocre
  • Developing and maintaining the code and systems which power mediocre.com, meh.com, morningsave.com, checkout.org, drone.horse, and more to come. This includes: the front- and back-end application code of the websites; the microservice applications providing data; and all the parts that move orders through the system and turns them into labels which go on boxes, then sends package tracking information all the way back to the customer.
  • Developing and maintaining the code and systems which import orders from other ecommerce outlets and deliver order tracking information back to them.
  • Digging into any data discrepancies between systems, and finding and fixing any bugs which cause these discrepancies.
  • Building internal tools and writing helper scripts to do things like import/export data, compare data between systems, generate reports, and prepare files before being read by integration tools.
  • Serving as hiring manager and manager for the Support Engineer position.
  • Developing and maintaining the code and systems which power mediocre.com, meh.com, morningsave.com, checkout.org, drone.horse, and more to come. This includes: the front- and back-end application code of the websites; the microservice applications providing data; and all the parts that move orders through the system and turns them into labels which go on boxes, then sends package tracking information all the way back to the customer.
  • Developing and maintaining the code and systems which import orders from other ecommerce outlets and deliver order tracking information back to them.
  • Digging into any data discrepancies between systems, and finding and fixing any bugs which cause these discrepancies.
  • Building internal tools and writing helper scripts to do things like import/export data, compare data between systems, generate reports, and prepare files before being read by integration tools.
  • Serving as hiring manager and manager for the Support Engineer position.

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Open source Mar 2011 → Oct 2014 (3 years, 8 months)

Generate memes from http://memegenerator.co via the command line

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Generate memes from http://memegenerator.co via the command line

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Position May 2012 → Jul 2014 (2 years, 3 months)
Owner & Web Developer at Firelight Webware
  • Develop front- and back-end code
  • Maintain Ubuntu servers on Rackspace and Digital Ocean
  • Work with clients to define application requirements

Projects

The Rooster - Radio Prep Site

gotrooster.com

A news site built in Django which offers article summaries and audio content to radio DJs. Implemented search with elasticsearch and django-haystack.

City of Denison Events Site

denisonlive.com

A Django application which uses the eventtools package to manage events and occurrences. Included is a downtown business directory with an admin interface for specifying locations on a map, as well as an interface to create event newsletters.

My Essilor Labs

myessilorlabs.com

As the backend half of a 2-person team, I developed a Django application with features such as:

  • Custom models to map to API returning XML results
  • Complex permission-based actions
  • Logging in users based on API authentication
  • Providing JSON results for frontend consumption
  • Caching API responses at the model-level
  • Single-signon to other client programs
  • Ajax handlers for everything from simple single value posts requiring nothing but a {success: true} JSON response, to those which re-render the entire form and pass back to frontend to replace the original
  • An admin-editable hierarchy for one section of the site, with fully editable items under each group

Offline Profit Calculator

Contract work for Farstar

Used Ember.js to create a tablet-friendly, offline accessible calculator for use by sales reps in the field to show their customers how much they could profit by replacing their competitors products with theirs.

Backbone.js-driven Site Builder

Contract work for Projekt202

Brought in last minute to help client meet accelerated deadline. Given reign over a section of the site, and completed all tasks assigned in issue tracker in a timely fashion, while learning backbone.js and mercurial for the project. Followed patterns set forth by the core team for consistent coding style.

  • Develop front- and back-end code
  • Maintain Ubuntu servers on Rackspace and Digital Ocean
  • Work with clients to define application requirements

Projects

The Rooster - Radio Prep Site

gotrooster.com

A news site built in Django which offers article summaries and audio content to radio DJs. Implemented search with elasticsearch and django-haystack.

City of Denison Events Site

denisonlive.com

A Django application which uses the eventtools package to manage events and occurrences. Included is a downtown business directory with an admin interface for specifying locations on a map, as well as an interface to create event newsletters.

My Essilor Labs

myessilorlabs.com

As the backend half of a 2-person team, I developed a Django application with features such as:

  • Custom models to map to API returning XML results
  • Complex permission-based actions
  • Logging in users based on API authentication
  • Providing JSON results for frontend consumption
  • Caching API responses at the model-level
  • Single-signon to other client programs
  • Ajax handlers for everything from simple single value posts requiring nothing but a {success: true} JSON response, to those which re-render the entire form and pass back to frontend to replace the original
  • An admin-editable hierarchy for one section of the site, with fully editable items under each group

Offline Profit Calculator

Contract work for Farstar

Used Ember.js to create a tablet-friendly, offline accessible calculator for use by sales reps in the field to show their customers how much they could profit by replacing their competitors products with theirs.

Backbone.js-driven Site Builder

Contract work for Projekt202

Brought in last minute to help client meet accelerated deadline. Given reign over a section of the site, and completed all tasks assigned in issue tracker in a timely fashion, while learning backbone.js and mercurial for the project. Followed patterns set forth by the core team for consistent coding style.

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Blogs or videos Nov 2013

This is an example of how to generate occurrences from python-dateutil's rrule module, and convert them properly to UTC before saving to the database, particularly if your input is localized to a timezone that observes daylight savings.

This is an example of how to generate occurrences from python-dateutil's rrule module, and convert them properly to UTC before saving to the database, particularly if your input is localized to a timezone that observes daylight savings.

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Open source Apr 2011 → Sep 2013 (2 years, 6 months)

Mac-only script for tracking active window. Records application name, window title, and extra data such as a URL or file path. Logs results as JSON, which you can parse however you pleaseth.

Creator.

Mac-only script for tracking active window. Records application name, window title, and extra data such as a URL or file path. Logs results as JSON, which you can parse however you pleaseth.

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Open source Jul 2013 → Jul 2013 (1 month)

A command line monty hall problem simulator

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A command line monty hall problem simulator

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Open source Jul 2013 → Jul 2013 (1 month)

Reroute outgoing mail (for use in dev/testing/staging environments)

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Reroute outgoing mail (for use in dev/testing/staging environments)

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Position Nov 2006 → May 2012 (5 years, 7 months)
Web Developer at Farstar

Started off as a front-end developer and gradually moved to mostly back-end development. Worked with PHP until 2010, when our senior developer was able to start implementing a Django deployment strategy and haven't looked back since.

  • Created a rewards site for the sales force of a large company
  • Developed custom visitor tracking system for our Lead Machine product
  • Help clients define requirements

Started off as a front-end developer and gradually moved to mostly back-end development. Worked with PHP until 2010, when our senior developer was able to start implementing a Django deployment strategy and haven't looked back since.

  • Created a rewards site for the sales force of a large company
  • Developed custom visitor tracking system for our Lead Machine product
  • Help clients define requirements

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Blogs or videos Sep 2010

Example: You have a branch 'refactor' that is quite different from master. You can't merge all of the

Example: You have a branch 'refactor' that is quite different from master. You can't merge all of the

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Blogs or videos Jul 2009

Pro tip by katy lavallee about postgresql.

Pro tip by katy lavallee about postgresql.

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Blogs or videos Jul 2009

I wanted Django’s syncdb command to create my tables as InnoDB with a default character set of utf8 and collation of utf8_unicode_ci.

I wanted Django’s syncdb command to create my tables as InnoDB with a default character set of utf8 and collation of utf8_unicode_ci.

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Blogs or videos Jul 2009

Thankfully, I don’t have to use the solution below anymore. It was really confusing to SVN when I switched between branches. I accidentally fixed it while solving…

Thankfully, I don’t have to use the solution below anymore. It was really confusing to SVN when I switched between branches. I accidentally fixed it while solving…

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Blogs or videos Jun 2009

Well, I created my first TextMate command. As with most development firsts, it’s really just a mashup of code scavenged elsewhere.

Well, I created my first TextMate command. As with most development firsts, it’s really just a mashup of code scavenged elsewhere.

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Position Dec 2003 → 2006 (2 years, 2 months)
Web Developer at Freelance

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Education Mar 1999 → Dec 1999
Desktop Publishing, North Texas Job Corps
  • Uprooted myself from dependence on my family and moved to Texas alone
  • Found my direction in life
  • Earned real money (nickels and pennies) playing my guitar in the courtyard
  • Uprooted myself from dependence on my family and moved to Texas alone
  • Found my direction in life
  • Earned real money (nickels and pennies) playing my guitar in the courtyard

Recommended reading

by My Secret Life as a Spaghetti Coder

"A system of code can never be completely de-coupled unless it does nothing. Cohesion is a different story. I can't claim that your code cannot be perfectly cohesive, but I can't claim that it can. My belief is it can be very close, but at some point you'll encounter diminishing returns on your quest to make it so. "

"A system of code can never be completely de-coupled unless it does nothing. Cohesion is a different story. I can't claim that your code cannot be perfectly cohesive, but I can't claim that it can. My belief is it can be very close, but at some point you'll encounter diminishing returns on your quest to make it so. "

This is a really good explanation of what makes working as a programmer difficult, and what programmers and their employers can do to make it better.

This is a really good explanation of what makes working as a programmer difficult, and what programmers and their employers can do to make it better.