Bruce Van Horn

Master of the Code, Creator of the Functionality, Keeper of the Quality, Destroyer of Bugs & Sifu to Future Masters

I am a full stack software engineer with a proven ability to develop high-performance applications for any platform or medium, come up with ideas nobody else does, and work directly with anybody, or nobody as required. I write killer documentation for my work, without being threatened or blackmailed. I teach and mentor those I work with to help them make their kung-fu strong. I do these things consistently, with the highest ethical standard, and with a positive attitude.

I am a full stack software engineer with a proven ability to develop high-performance applications for any platform or medium, come up with ideas nobody else does, and work directly with anybody, or nobody as required. I write killer documentation for my work, without being threatened or blackmailed. I teach and mentor those I work with to help them make their kung-fu strong. I do these things consistently, with the highest ethical standard, and with a positive attitude.

Favorite editor: Visual Studio Code • First computer: TRS-80 Model I 4K with bundled cassette deck (I still have it, and it still works!)

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Position Jul 2017 → Current (1 year, 4 months)
Instructor, Full Stack Code Bootcamp at Southern Methodist University

I teach a six month intensive training course on full stack web development powered by Trilogy Education.

I teach a six month intensive training course on full stack web development powered by Trilogy Education.

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Position Jan 2017 → Current (1 year, 10 months)
Author at Lynda.com

Authored and recorded video courses for publication.

Authored and recorded video courses for publication.

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Position 2013 → Current (5 years, 10 months)
Lead Developer at Visual Storage Intelligence

Lead Developer for storage analytics and business intelligence SaaS product. I joined Clear Technologies / VSI in 2013 as the lead developer. Clear Technologies is an IBM VAR and a vendor of enterprise class storage and IT products. As you can imagine, there are other players in this space, so to differentiate themselves they created a product, almost by accident, called Visual Storage Intelligence. It started off as a set of spreadsheets which were later "productized" into a SaaS offering.

When I joined the team there were two other people on the team, one other developer and a system admin. My boss told me he prefers to be "tool heavy and light on personnel".

The first thing I did was streamline and formalize the publication process. I'm guessing their "Joel Score" was about a 5. I added unit tests to as much of the code as I could. This allowed me to learn the code base while adding value. I installed TeamCity and automated the build / test cycle. I used VMWare to create a formal Dev / Staging environment in which to run tests. I added selenium testing to validate UI changes.

I then went to work on the database. I used Red Gate to bring it under revision control and added Octopus Deploy to control deployments of all our products including the database.

Our customers were asking for more printed reports, the opposite of what you'd expect. Naturally, I was given an impossibly short deadline. SQL Server Reporting Services seemed like a good fit because it has obvious integration with our SQL Server Database, and it has a visual designer which cuts my design efforts way down.

While I was told to be "tool heavy", the licensing costs for our use case would have been prohibitive. So, I created a PDF rendering engine in C# that worked by converting Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services report definitions into PDF's - something the "Enterprise" product can do, but I was limited to the standard edition. It worked really well. I modeled it after Safari Books Online, a site that let's you download book chapters. Mine integrated the ability to e-mail the reports to a list of users.

After several weeks on the job, my one developer left for another opportunity, so I hired the best database programmer I knew. Together we audited the database structure and worked to streamline it.

We eventually decided there was an innate design flaw in the application. Our application suffered from performance issues. We had signed a few bigger customers, and the bigger the database got, the slower the site became. We indexed, optimized, and re-indexed but this proved to be a short term fix

The problem was that the database stored the raw data for our customers. Each web request was performing all of the computations to transform and present the data -- in other words, it was a very traditional CRUD based web app design.

The nature of our app is that customers upload data for analysis. After that upload that data does not normally ever change. What we needed was a data warehouse. So the team of two re-designed the application database to become a data warehouse. We went from 400 tables down to about 40. Our stored proc count went from about 800 to, at present, about 100, and the complexity of the procs in question was greatly reduced since we don't typically do any joins.

Once we did this we found that the aging MVC3 app was almost redundant (in a bad way). We replaced it with a Python Flask app. I chose Flask because it is very simple, platform agnostic, and having worked with similar C# web api and Java frameworks, I found the learning curve is almost non-existent.

In time, Clear Technologies partnered with Redis Labs so we're adding a Redis cache to speed up our performance even more.

Today, our app enjoys a serious facelift, and a fully modernized stack.

Lead Developer for storage analytics and business intelligence SaaS product. I joined Clear Technologies / VSI in 2013 as the lead developer. Clear Technologies is an IBM VAR and a vendor of enterprise class storage and IT products. As you can imagine, there are other players in this space, so to differentiate themselves they created a product, almost by accident, called Visual Storage Intelligence. It started off as a set of spreadsheets which were later "productized" into a SaaS offering.

When I joined the team there were two other people on the team, one other developer and a system admin. My boss told me he prefers to be "tool heavy and light on personnel".

The first thing I did was streamline and formalize the publication process. I'm guessing their "Joel Score" was about a 5. I added unit tests to as much of the code as I could. This allowed me to learn the code base while adding value. I installed TeamCity and automated the build / test cycle. I used VMWare to create a formal Dev / Staging environment in which to run tests. I added selenium testing to validate UI changes.

I then went to work on the database. I used Red Gate to bring it under revision control and added Octopus Deploy to control deployments of all our products including the database.

Our customers were asking for more printed reports, the opposite of what you'd expect. Naturally, I was given an impossibly short deadline. SQL Server Reporting Services seemed like a good fit because it has obvious integration with our SQL Server Database, and it has a visual designer which cuts my design efforts way down.

While I was told to be "tool heavy", the licensing costs for our use case would have been prohibitive. So, I created a PDF rendering engine in C# that worked by converting Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services report definitions into PDF's - something the "Enterprise" product can do, but I was limited to the standard edition. It worked really well. I modeled it after Safari Books Online, a site that let's you download book chapters. Mine integrated the ability to e-mail the reports to a list of users.

After several weeks on the job, my one developer left for another opportunity, so I hired the best database programmer I knew. Together we audited the database structure and worked to streamline it.

We eventually decided there was an innate design flaw in the application. Our application suffered from performance issues. We had signed a few bigger customers, and the bigger the database got, the slower the site became. We indexed, optimized, and re-indexed but this proved to be a short term fix

The problem was that the database stored the raw data for our customers. Each web request was performing all of the computations to transform and present the data -- in other words, it was a very traditional CRUD based web app design.

The nature of our app is that customers upload data for analysis. After that upload that data does not normally ever change. What we needed was a data warehouse. So the team of two re-designed the application database to become a data warehouse. We went from 400 tables down to about 40. Our stored proc count went from about 800 to, at present, about 100, and the complexity of the procs in question was greatly reduced since we don't typically do any joins.

Once we did this we found that the aging MVC3 app was almost redundant (in a bad way). We replaced it with a Python Flask app. I chose Flask because it is very simple, platform agnostic, and having worked with similar C# web api and Java frameworks, I found the learning curve is almost non-existent.

In time, Clear Technologies partnered with Redis Labs so we're adding a Redis cache to speed up our performance even more.

Today, our app enjoys a serious facelift, and a fully modernized stack.

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Position Jan 1994 → Current (24 years, 11 months)
Adjunct Professor at Richland College

Responsible for instruction of beginning and advanced game programming as part of an accredited 2 year degree program.

I teach students with sometimes little to no programming experience to become highly competent Unity game developers.

I have taught here for over 20 years. Obviously, it hasn't always been Unity. Over the years, I've taught Intro to Multimedia, Photoshop, Beginning 2D Animation, Flash ActionScript Programming, Java, Project Management, eCommerce, and a few portfolio courses.

Responsible for instruction of beginning and advanced game programming as part of an accredited 2 year degree program.

I teach students with sometimes little to no programming experience to become highly competent Unity game developers.

I have taught here for over 20 years. Obviously, it hasn't always been Unity. Over the years, I've taught Intro to Multimedia, Photoshop, Beginning 2D Animation, Flash ActionScript Programming, Java, Project Management, eCommerce, and a few portfolio courses.

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Feature or Apps Jan 2017

Do your first graders love homework? Mine don't. Getting them to practice their math speed drills just got a whole lot easier with this app. It features a very cute, very hungry fox who gets to eat tasty treats for every right answer your student gives.

Do your first graders love homework? Mine don't. Getting them to practice their math speed drills just got a whole lot easier with this app. It features a very cute, very hungry fox who gets to eat tasty treats for every right answer your student gives.

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Feature or Apps Apr 2016

Version 4.0 represents a major release of our SaaS offering. The new version offers support for several new array types (more being added every month), enterprise reporting, business unit analysis, and historical data reporting and forecasting.

Version 4.0 represents a major release of our SaaS offering. The new version offers support for several new array types (more being added every month), enterprise reporting, business unit analysis, and historical data reporting and forecasting.

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Blogs or videos Mar 2016

You love Octopus Deploy, because, who doesn't? But you've decided to ditch the bloat that comes with the latest .NET web API stack and go with a microframework like Flask. But Octopus is designed to work with .NET! How can you have your digital cake and eat it too?

You love Octopus Deploy, because, who doesn't? But you've decided to ditch the bloat that comes with the latest .NET web API stack and go with a microframework like Flask. But Octopus is designed to work with .NET! How can you have your digital cake and eat it too?

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Life Changing Event Jul 2015
Dermatomyositis in Full Remission

There is no cure for dermatomyositis. Mine miraculously went into full remission. After years of being told I will probably never walk again, I can walk (5 miles per day), talk (4 hour lectures given once per week) and eat with the best of you. (see Philippians 4:13)

There is no cure for dermatomyositis. Mine miraculously went into full remission. After years of being told I will probably never walk again, I can walk (5 miles per day), talk (4 hour lectures given once per week) and eat with the best of you. (see Philippians 4:13)

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Blogs or videos Oct 2014

Remember the scene in Full Metal Jacket where they're learning the rifleman's creed? I re-wrote it for programmers.

Remember the scene in Full Metal Jacket where they're learning the rifleman's creed? I re-wrote it for programmers.

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Position 2011 → 2013 (3 years)
Senior Software Developer at Access Systems

I was hired to lead a development effort using One Network's platform, but it never materialized. Instead I wound up working on a related project for the PM AMMO group of the United States Marine Corps using DotNet Nuke.

I was hired to lead a development effort using One Network's platform, but it never materialized. Instead I wound up working on a related project for the PM AMMO group of the United States Marine Corps using DotNet Nuke.

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Education Jan 2012 → Jan 2013
Software Engineering, Regis University

I started a master's in Software Engineering but couldn't complete as my dermatomyositis worsened. When I left, I had a perfect 4.0 average.

I started a master's in Software Engineering but couldn't complete as my dermatomyositis worsened. When I left, I had a perfect 4.0 average.

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Award 2011
Navy IS&T Excellence Award

The Navy awards this to civilian IT contractors who serve their country with distinction by making important contributions to our national defense. It is very hard to get. The PM AMMO project team won the award.

The Navy awards this to civilian IT contractors who serve their country with distinction by making important contributions to our national defense. It is very hard to get. The PM AMMO project team won the award.

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Life Changing Event Jun 2011
Gave my life to Christ

Whosoever therefore shall confess me before men, him will I confess also before my Father which is in heaven. -- Matthew 10:32

Whosoever therefore shall confess me before men, him will I confess also before my Father which is in heaven. -- Matthew 10:32

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Life Changing Event Jun 2011
Diagnosed with Dermatomyositis

An incurable autoimmune disease similar to lupus or muscular dystrophy. I lost the ability to walk, speak, and eat. I took chemo and all my hair fell out. I never once took disability. By the grace of God, it never affected my hands (I could still type) and the medications actually made my mind race all the time, so I turned into a bed-ridden super-programmer. I burned up all my sick time and vacation, but I never stopped working. I even taught myself Android development while fighting an infection in a hospital.

An incurable autoimmune disease similar to lupus or muscular dystrophy. I lost the ability to walk, speak, and eat. I took chemo and all my hair fell out. I never once took disability. By the grace of God, it never affected my hands (I could still type) and the medications actually made my mind race all the time, so I turned into a bed-ridden super-programmer. I burned up all my sick time and vacation, but I never stopped working. I even taught myself Android development while fighting an infection in a hospital.

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Position Jan 2010 → Jan 2011 (1 year, 1 month)
Lead Documentation and Developer Training at One Network Enterprises

One Network was looking to take their application development framework to open source. I volunteered to take on all the documentation, developer training, and on-boarding support. Given my talents for writing and teaching, I felt I could contribute to the company in areas that are... how to put this politely... um... areas where most developers are stereotypically lacking.

I also used my graphic design skills to re-design the UX for the product prior to its open source launch.

One Network was looking to take their application development framework to open source. I volunteered to take on all the documentation, developer training, and on-boarding support. Given my talents for writing and teaching, I felt I could contribute to the company in areas that are... how to put this politely... um... areas where most developers are stereotypically lacking.

I also used my graphic design skills to re-design the UX for the product prior to its open source launch.

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Position Jan 2008 → Jan 2010 (2 years, 1 month)
Senior Software Developer at One Network Enterprises

I was a senior Java developer hired to work in the Government and Custom Development group at One Network. One Network makes a software development platform designed around creating high-end multi-tenant logistics and inventory management systems.

I really only worked on one project - the PM AMMO project, which was a system designed to replace the inventory and supply chain management system used by the United States Marine Corps to manage and track their Class V ammunition.

I was a senior Java developer hired to work in the Government and Custom Development group at One Network. One Network makes a software development platform designed around creating high-end multi-tenant logistics and inventory management systems.

I really only worked on one project - the PM AMMO project, which was a system designed to replace the inventory and supply chain management system used by the United States Marine Corps to manage and track their Class V ammunition.

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Life Changing Event Sep 2009
Married the Woman of My Dreams

Fellas, and I'm just talking to the fellas here, here's an angle you maybe didn't consider. I have my anniversary date right here on my developer story - one more place to keep it so I'm never without a gift and flowers on the big day.

Fellas, and I'm just talking to the fellas here, here's an angle you maybe didn't consider. I have my anniversary date right here on my developer story - one more place to keep it so I'm never without a gift and flowers on the big day.

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Position Jan 2007 → Jan 2008 (1 year, 1 month)
Vice President, Worldwide Studios at TWL Knowledge Group

I was promoted and given a fancy title. Essentially, I was very effective in making the Content organization efficient and successful, so they put me in charge of all the studios. The only departments not reporting to me were sales and accounting.

There probably isn't enough room to cover what I did day-to-day: I kept the place running. One day I was working with customer support to restructure how we handled customer calls. Another day I might be writing code to fix a problem in our video or test delivery systems. The day after that I'd be overseeing a broadcast or helping with a video shoot that was short-handed. I remember staying late often to run the DVD and VHS duplication robots, and making sure the night shift engineer had a sandwich and enough coffee to get him through the night.

I kept all my old responsibilities. The biggest objective at the time was to manage the transition from what had been traditionally a video production and broadcast operation to becoming a purely online, and more interactive product offering.

I developed all of the new content prototypes personally using Flash in some cases and Unity in others.

I also wound up doing a lot of internal dispute resolution owing to the drastic changes in structure and leadership the company was facing at the time.

I was promoted and given a fancy title. Essentially, I was very effective in making the Content organization efficient and successful, so they put me in charge of all the studios. The only departments not reporting to me were sales and accounting.

There probably isn't enough room to cover what I did day-to-day: I kept the place running. One day I was working with customer support to restructure how we handled customer calls. Another day I might be writing code to fix a problem in our video or test delivery systems. The day after that I'd be overseeing a broadcast or helping with a video shoot that was short-handed. I remember staying late often to run the DVD and VHS duplication robots, and making sure the night shift engineer had a sandwich and enough coffee to get him through the night.

I kept all my old responsibilities. The biggest objective at the time was to manage the transition from what had been traditionally a video production and broadcast operation to becoming a purely online, and more interactive product offering.

I developed all of the new content prototypes personally using Flash in some cases and Unity in others.

I also wound up doing a lot of internal dispute resolution owing to the drastic changes in structure and leadership the company was facing at the time.

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Position Jan 2005 → Jan 2007 (2 years, 1 month)
Director of Content Services at Primedia

As Director of Content Services, I played a central role in managing the department that developed and delivered high quality interactive learning experiences both online and on hard media (DVD / CDROM).

I developed content delivery formats and engines using Flash, C#, HTML, and ASP.NET.

The company was sold and changed its name first to Trinity Workplace Learning, and later to TWL Knowledge Group

As Director of Content Services, I played a central role in managing the department that developed and delivered high quality interactive learning experiences both online and on hard media (DVD / CDROM).

I developed content delivery formats and engines using Flash, C#, HTML, and ASP.NET.

The company was sold and changed its name first to Trinity Workplace Learning, and later to TWL Knowledge Group

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Feature or Apps May 2005

This app had two parts. First was a test authoring tool written by a staff developer in C# as a desktop app. It allowed content experts to create exams on the learning content presented in our online courses.

My piece was the customer facing part. The test presentation system was a SCORM compliant javascript application we could embed into our LMS. The LMS would pass a URL to the XML document exported by the authoring tool, and my app rendered it as an exam with all the bells and whistles. It was self grading while simultaneously obfuscating the correct answers (to prevent users smart enough to view the network traffic hoping to see the answers).

The results were sent back to the LMS owing to the apps SCORM compliance in the JavaScript.

This was a very early adoption of AJAX.

This app had two parts. First was a test authoring tool written by a staff developer in C# as a desktop app. It allowed content experts to create exams on the learning content presented in our online courses.

My piece was the customer facing part. The test presentation system was a SCORM compliant javascript application we could embed into our LMS. The LMS would pass a URL to the XML document exported by the authoring tool, and my app rendered it as an exam with all the bells and whistles. It was self grading while simultaneously obfuscating the correct answers (to prevent users smart enough to view the network traffic hoping to see the answers).

The results were sent back to the LMS owing to the apps SCORM compliance in the JavaScript.

This was a very early adoption of AJAX.

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Feature or Apps Mar 2005

I came onboard just as the company was looking to move from primarily offering video products on DVD and VHS tape to more online streaming video.

The challenge was how to get thousands of titles stored on beta and dv tape into a streaming format. I developed a custom p2p video compression technology that allowed us to leverage the 300 employee computers in the building as one big compression farm during off hours. We had staff handle digitization 8-10 hours per day using several of the company's editing bays whenever they were not being used for production. Within a year we had over 1,500 titles available online and it became the company's largest selling product offering.

Note: Don't bother with the link - TWL declared bankruptcy and closed its doors in 2007. I don't know what became of the systems I built for them, but I have to put a link, so I put the old one.

I came onboard just as the company was looking to move from primarily offering video products on DVD and VHS tape to more online streaming video.

The challenge was how to get thousands of titles stored on beta and dv tape into a streaming format. I developed a custom p2p video compression technology that allowed us to leverage the 300 employee computers in the building as one big compression farm during off hours. We had staff handle digitization 8-10 hours per day using several of the company's editing bays whenever they were not being used for production. Within a year we had over 1,500 titles available online and it became the company's largest selling product offering.

Note: Don't bother with the link - TWL declared bankruptcy and closed its doors in 2007. I don't know what became of the systems I built for them, but I have to put a link, so I put the old one.

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Education Jun 1986 → Dec 1991
B.A. Psychology, University of Oklahoma

I double majored in Psychology and Pre-Medical.

I think most people think Psych majors learn about Freud and how to discuss your relationship with your mother. While you do take an intro class with that in it, it's a research degree. Math, experimental design, etc. It's not the same as a physics degree, but you learn all the same basic scientific principles with a focus on conducting and publishing research.

I had figured on becoming a psychologist or a psychiatrist. I discovered during my internship in my final year that I really didn't like it very much. You don't really get to help people who are very sick (you just warehouse and medicate them), and the one's who aren't very sick (just maladjusted) tend to be whiny idiots.

During my sophomore year, my favorite professor gave me a key to his computer lab and it turned out that I was way better at that.

Aside from being the only person in my family (amongst my siblings) to graduate with a college degree, there were two things I was very proud of.

I worked in, and briefly ran the Suicide / Crisis Intervention Hotline. I created a computerized case management system that really helped them run a more effective organization. I also got to help a few people, and I actually saved one person's life.

The other achievement was working with Dr. Charles Gettys to develop some of the first multimedia instructional technology for use in the classroom. We developed what amounts to powerpoint before powerpoint (or anything like it) was available for sale. For that matter, projecting images from a computer, very common now, but back then it couldn't be done.

We used a transparent four color (CGA) LCD panel on top of a traditional overhead projector. Kludgy, but it worked and it was way ahead of its time.

I double majored in Psychology and Pre-Medical.

I think most people think Psych majors learn about Freud and how to discuss your relationship with your mother. While you do take an intro class with that in it, it's a research degree. Math, experimental design, etc. It's not the same as a physics degree, but you learn all the same basic scientific principles with a focus on conducting and publishing research.

I had figured on becoming a psychologist or a psychiatrist. I discovered during my internship in my final year that I really didn't like it very much. You don't really get to help people who are very sick (you just warehouse and medicate them), and the one's who aren't very sick (just maladjusted) tend to be whiny idiots.

During my sophomore year, my favorite professor gave me a key to his computer lab and it turned out that I was way better at that.

Aside from being the only person in my family (amongst my siblings) to graduate with a college degree, there were two things I was very proud of.

I worked in, and briefly ran the Suicide / Crisis Intervention Hotline. I created a computerized case management system that really helped them run a more effective organization. I also got to help a few people, and I actually saved one person's life.

The other achievement was working with Dr. Charles Gettys to develop some of the first multimedia instructional technology for use in the classroom. We developed what amounts to powerpoint before powerpoint (or anything like it) was available for sale. For that matter, projecting images from a computer, very common now, but back then it couldn't be done.

We used a transparent four color (CGA) LCD panel on top of a traditional overhead projector. Kludgy, but it worked and it was way ahead of its time.

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Career Milestone Jul 1980
First Programming Contract

I was 13. I worked at the Oklahoma City Tennis Club in the snack bar. The paid me to "computerize their books".

I was 13. I worked at the Oklahoma City Tennis Club in the snack bar. The paid me to "computerize their books".

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Life Changing Event Dec 1979
My First Computer
My First Computer

TRS-80 Model 1 Level 1 4K. For the younger folks, there is no hard drive. There isn't really an OS -- just a non-updateable BIOS which is burned into the hardware along with a BASIC interpreter. So your programming options are BASIC or Z80 assembly language. Your programs and data are stored on cassette tape. You can only run one program at a time.

TRS-80 Model 1 Level 1 4K. For the younger folks, there is no hard drive. There isn't really an OS -- just a non-updateable BIOS which is burned into the hardware along with a BASIC interpreter. So your programming options are BASIC or Z80 assembly language. Your programs and data are stored on cassette tape. You can only run one program at a time.

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Life Changing Event Dec 1967
I was born

Satis superque

Satis superque

Recommended reading

by Edward Tufte

A must-read for anyone who develops systems that display data.

A must-read for anyone who develops systems that display data.

by Alan Cooper

I actually read the first edition which at this stage is really old. It was, for decades the rulebook for UI / UX design for Windows application specifically, and UX in general.

I actually read the first edition which at this stage is really old. It was, for decades the rulebook for UI / UX design for Windows application specifically, and UX in general.

by Michael Hernandez

The first, and perhaps only book you need on the subject of relational database design.

The first, and perhaps only book you need on the subject of relational database design.

by Douglas Crockford

While controversial, it did entirely change the way I write code, not just in JavaScript, but pretty much everywhere.

While controversial, it did entirely change the way I write code, not just in JavaScript, but pretty much everywhere.

by God, et al.

Al Gore may have invented the interwebs, but God invented Al Gore. And electrons. So really it was God all along.

Al Gore may have invented the interwebs, but God invented Al Gore. And electrons. So really it was God all along.