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missimer

Senior Member of Technical Staff at Draper
Last active on Stack Overflow 3 days ago
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Position Sep 2017 → Current (1 year)
Senior Member of Technical Staff at Draper

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Feature or Apps

A lightweight, predictable and dependable kernel for multicore processors

I have developed a real-time USB subsystem, an I/O aware mixed-criticality scheduling algorithm and a triple modular redundancy fault tolerance technique that uses virtualization to protect the system from soft errors.

A lightweight, predictable and dependable kernel for multicore processors

I have developed a real-time USB subsystem, an I/O aware mixed-criticality scheduling algorithm and a triple modular redundancy fault tolerance technique that uses virtualization to protect the system from soft errors.

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Open source Mar 2017 → Current (1 year, 6 months)
Last commit on Mar 29, 18
36 Commits / 6,877 ++ / 1,013 --

Two-Level Segregate Fit Memory Allocator

Two-Level Segregate Fit Memory Allocator

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Blogs or videos

Richard West, Ye Li and Eric Missimer, "Time Management in the Quest-V RTOS", in the 8th Annual Workshop on Operating Systems Platforms for Embedded Real-Time Applications (OSPERT), Pisa, Italy, July 10, 2012.

Abstract: Quest-V is a new system currently under development for multicore processors. It comprises a collection of separate kernels operating together as a distributed system on a chip. Each kernel is isolated from others using virtualization techniques, so that faults do not propagate throughout the entire system. This multikernel design supports online fault recovery of compromised or misbehaving services without the need for full system reboots. While the system is designed for high-confidence computing environments that require dependability, Quest-V is also designed to be predictable. It treats time as a first-class resource, requiring that all operations are properly accounted and handled in real-time. This paper focuses on the design aspects of Quest-V that relate to how time is managed. Special attention is given to how Quest-V manages time in four key areas: (1) scheduling and migration of threads and virtual CPUs, (2) I/O management, (3) communication, and (4) fault recovery.

Richard West, Ye Li and Eric Missimer, "Time Management in the Quest-V RTOS", in the 8th Annual Workshop on Operating Systems Platforms for Embedded Real-Time Applications (OSPERT), Pisa, Italy, July 10, 2012.

Abstract: Quest-V is a new system currently under development for multicore processors. It comprises a collection of separate kernels operating together as a distributed system on a chip. Each kernel is isolated from others using virtualization techniques, so that faults do not propagate throughout the entire system. This multikernel design supports online fault recovery of compromised or misbehaving services without the need for full system reboots. While the system is designed for high-confidence computing environments that require dependability, Quest-V is also designed to be predictable. It treats time as a first-class resource, requiring that all operations are properly accounted and handled in real-time. This paper focuses on the design aspects of Quest-V that relate to how time is managed. Special attention is given to how Quest-V manages time in four key areas: (1) scheduling and migration of threads and virtual CPUs, (2) I/O management, (3) communication, and (4) fault recovery.

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Blogs or videos

Eric Missimer, Ye Li and Richard West, "Real-Time USB Communication in the Quest Operating System", in Proceedings of the 19th IEEE Real-Time and Embedded Technology and Applications Symposium (RTAS 2013), Philadelphia, USA, April 2013.

Abstract: This paper describes a real-time USB 2 subsystem for the Quest operating system. Quest is designed for real-time embedded systems. Such systems need to interact with their environment using sensors and actuators. On many embedded platforms today there is support for basic serial, USB 2.0 and 100 Mbps Ethernet. Of these, USB 2.0 supports the highest throughput, while also supporting real-time communication.

We show how the Quest USB 2.0 sub-system improves upon some of the deficiencies in USB software stacks in systems such as Linux through experimental evaluation. We demonstrate that the Quest USB sub-system is capable of predictable bandwidth allocation and increased overall performance. By dynamically reordering transaction requests, Quest’s USB sub-system is able to avoid unnecessary admission control rejections. Additionally, we are able to provide real-time guarantees for asynchronous USB transactions such as bulk transfers, which are typically treated in a best-effort manner. Real-time guarantees for bulk transactions are necessary for any system interacting with devices that implement bulk endpoints such as in a real-time file system. The paper also introduces an algorithm for USB scheduling that accepts more requests and provides bulk transfer guarantees, for cases where Linux fails.

Eric Missimer, Ye Li and Richard West, "Real-Time USB Communication in the Quest Operating System", in Proceedings of the 19th IEEE Real-Time and Embedded Technology and Applications Symposium (RTAS 2013), Philadelphia, USA, April 2013.

Abstract: This paper describes a real-time USB 2 subsystem for the Quest operating system. Quest is designed for real-time embedded systems. Such systems need to interact with their environment using sensors and actuators. On many embedded platforms today there is support for basic serial, USB 2.0 and 100 Mbps Ethernet. Of these, USB 2.0 supports the highest throughput, while also supporting real-time communication.

We show how the Quest USB 2.0 sub-system improves upon some of the deficiencies in USB software stacks in systems such as Linux through experimental evaluation. We demonstrate that the Quest USB sub-system is capable of predictable bandwidth allocation and increased overall performance. By dynamically reordering transaction requests, Quest’s USB sub-system is able to avoid unnecessary admission control rejections. Additionally, we are able to provide real-time guarantees for asynchronous USB transactions such as bulk transfers, which are typically treated in a best-effort manner. Real-time guarantees for bulk transactions are necessary for any system interacting with devices that implement bulk endpoints such as in a real-time file system. The paper also introduces an algorithm for USB scheduling that accepts more requests and provides bulk transfer guarantees, for cases where Linux fails.

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Blogs or videos

Ye Li, Richard West, Eric Missimer, "The Quest-V Separation Kernel for Mixed Criticality Systems", in Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Mixed Criticality Systems (WMC) at the 34th IEEE Real-Time Systems Symposium (RTSS 2013), Vancouver, Canada, December 2013.

Abstract: Multi- and many-core processors are becoming increasingly popular in embedded systems. Many of these processors now feature hardware virtualization capabilities, such as the ARM Cortex A15, and x86 processors with Intel VT-x or AMD-V support. Hardware virtualization offers opportunities to partition physical resources, including processor cores, memory and I/O devices amongst guest virtual machines. Mixed criticality systems and services can then co-exist on the same platform in separate virtual machines. However, traditional virtual machine systems are too expensive because of the costs of trapping into hypervisors to multiplex and manage machine physical resources on behalf of separate guests. For example, hypervisors are needed to schedule separate VMs on physical processor cores. In this paper, we discuss the design of the Quest-V separation kernel, that partitions services of different criticalities in separate virtual machines, or sandboxes. Each sandbox encapsulates a subset of machine physical resources that it manages without requiring intervention of a hypervisor. Moreover, a hypervisor is not needed for normal operation, except to bootstrap the system and establish communication channels between sandboxes.

Ye Li, Richard West, Eric Missimer, "The Quest-V Separation Kernel for Mixed Criticality Systems", in Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Mixed Criticality Systems (WMC) at the 34th IEEE Real-Time Systems Symposium (RTSS 2013), Vancouver, Canada, December 2013.

Abstract: Multi- and many-core processors are becoming increasingly popular in embedded systems. Many of these processors now feature hardware virtualization capabilities, such as the ARM Cortex A15, and x86 processors with Intel VT-x or AMD-V support. Hardware virtualization offers opportunities to partition physical resources, including processor cores, memory and I/O devices amongst guest virtual machines. Mixed criticality systems and services can then co-exist on the same platform in separate virtual machines. However, traditional virtual machine systems are too expensive because of the costs of trapping into hypervisors to multiplex and manage machine physical resources on behalf of separate guests. For example, hypervisors are needed to schedule separate VMs on physical processor cores. In this paper, we discuss the design of the Quest-V separation kernel, that partitions services of different criticalities in separate virtual machines, or sandboxes. Each sandbox encapsulates a subset of machine physical resources that it manages without requiring intervention of a hypervisor. Moreover, a hypervisor is not needed for normal operation, except to bootstrap the system and establish communication channels between sandboxes.

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Blogs or videos

Ye Li, Richard West, Eric Missimer, "A Virtualized Separation Kernel for Mixed Criticality Systems", in Proceedings of the 10th ACM SIGPLAN/SIGOPS International Conference on Virtual Execution Environments (VEE), Salt Lake City, Utah, March 1-2 2014.

Abstract: Multi- and many-core processors are becoming increasingly popular in embedded systems. Many of these processors now feature hardware virtualization capabilities, such as the ARM Cortex A15, and x86 processors with Intel VT-x or AMD-V support. Hardware virtualization offers opportunities to partition physical resources, including processor cores, memory and I/O devices amongst guest virtual machines. Mixed criticality systems and services can then coexist on the same platform in separate virtual machines. However, traditional virtual machine systems are too expensive because of the costs of trapping into hypervisors to multiplex and manage machine physical resources on behalf of separate guests. For example, hypervisors are needed to schedule separate VMs on physical processor cores. In this paper, we discuss the design of the Quest-V separation kernel, which partitions services of different criticalities in separate virtual machines, or sandboxes. Each sandbox encapsulates a subset of machine physical resources that it manages without requiring intervention of a hypervisor. Moreover, a hypervisor is not needed for normal operation, except to bootstrap the system and establish communication channels between sandboxes.

Ye Li, Richard West, Eric Missimer, "A Virtualized Separation Kernel for Mixed Criticality Systems", in Proceedings of the 10th ACM SIGPLAN/SIGOPS International Conference on Virtual Execution Environments (VEE), Salt Lake City, Utah, March 1-2 2014.

Abstract: Multi- and many-core processors are becoming increasingly popular in embedded systems. Many of these processors now feature hardware virtualization capabilities, such as the ARM Cortex A15, and x86 processors with Intel VT-x or AMD-V support. Hardware virtualization offers opportunities to partition physical resources, including processor cores, memory and I/O devices amongst guest virtual machines. Mixed criticality systems and services can then coexist on the same platform in separate virtual machines. However, traditional virtual machine systems are too expensive because of the costs of trapping into hypervisors to multiplex and manage machine physical resources on behalf of separate guests. For example, hypervisors are needed to schedule separate VMs on physical processor cores. In this paper, we discuss the design of the Quest-V separation kernel, which partitions services of different criticalities in separate virtual machines, or sandboxes. Each sandbox encapsulates a subset of machine physical resources that it manages without requiring intervention of a hypervisor. Moreover, a hypervisor is not needed for normal operation, except to bootstrap the system and establish communication channels between sandboxes.

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Blogs or videos

Eric Missimer, Richard West, "Distributed Real-Time Fault Tolerance on a Virtualized Multi-Core System", in the 10th Annual Workshop on Operating Systems Platforms for Embedded Real-Time Applications (OSPERT), Madrid, Spain, July 8, 2014.

Abstract: This paper presents different approaches for real-time fault tolerance using redundancy methods for multi-core systems. Using hardware virtualization, a distributed system on a chip is created, where the cores are isolated from one another except through explicit communication channels. Using this system architecture, redundant tasks that would typically be run on separate processors can be consolidated onto a single multi-core processor while still maintaining high confidence of system reliability. A multi-core chip-level distributed system could therefore offer an alternative to traditional automotive systems, for example, which typically use a controller area network such as CAN bus to interconnect multiple electronic control units. Using memory as the explicit communication channel, new recovery techniques that require higher bandwidths and lower latencies than those of traditional networks, now become viable. In this work, we discuss several such techniques we are considering in our chip-level distributed system called Quest-V.

Eric Missimer, Richard West, "Distributed Real-Time Fault Tolerance on a Virtualized Multi-Core System", in the 10th Annual Workshop on Operating Systems Platforms for Embedded Real-Time Applications (OSPERT), Madrid, Spain, July 8, 2014.

Abstract: This paper presents different approaches for real-time fault tolerance using redundancy methods for multi-core systems. Using hardware virtualization, a distributed system on a chip is created, where the cores are isolated from one another except through explicit communication channels. Using this system architecture, redundant tasks that would typically be run on separate processors can be consolidated onto a single multi-core processor while still maintaining high confidence of system reliability. A multi-core chip-level distributed system could therefore offer an alternative to traditional automotive systems, for example, which typically use a controller area network such as CAN bus to interconnect multiple electronic control units. Using memory as the explicit communication channel, new recovery techniques that require higher bandwidths and lower latencies than those of traditional networks, now become viable. In this work, we discuss several such techniques we are considering in our chip-level distributed system called Quest-V.

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Blogs or videos

Ye Li, Richard West, Zhuoqun Cheng and Eric Missimer, "Predictable Communication and Migration in the Quest-V Separation Kernel", in Proceedings of the 35th IEEE Real-Time Systems Symposium (RTSS), Rome, Italy, December 2-5 2014.

Abstract: Quest-V is a separation kernel, which partitions a system into a collection of sandboxes. Each sandbox encapsulates one or more processing cores, a region of machine physical memory, and a subset of I/O devices. Quest-V behaves like a distributed system on a chip, using explicit communication channels to exchange data and migrate addresses spaces between sandboxes, which operate like traditional hosts. This design has benefits in safety-critical systems, which require continued availability in the presence of failures. Additionally, online faults can be recovered without rebooting an entire system. However, the programming model for such a system is more complicated. Each sandbox has its own local scheduler, and threads must communicate using message passing with those in remote sandboxes. Similarly, address spaces may need to be migrated between sandboxes, to ensure newly forked processes do not violate the feasibility of existing local task schedules. Migration may also be needed to move a thread closer to its required resources, such as I/O devices that are not directly available in the local sandbox. This paper describes how Quest-V performs real-time communication and migration without violating service guarantees for existing threads.

Ye Li, Richard West, Zhuoqun Cheng and Eric Missimer, "Predictable Communication and Migration in the Quest-V Separation Kernel", in Proceedings of the 35th IEEE Real-Time Systems Symposium (RTSS), Rome, Italy, December 2-5 2014.

Abstract: Quest-V is a separation kernel, which partitions a system into a collection of sandboxes. Each sandbox encapsulates one or more processing cores, a region of machine physical memory, and a subset of I/O devices. Quest-V behaves like a distributed system on a chip, using explicit communication channels to exchange data and migrate addresses spaces between sandboxes, which operate like traditional hosts. This design has benefits in safety-critical systems, which require continued availability in the presence of failures. Additionally, online faults can be recovered without rebooting an entire system. However, the programming model for such a system is more complicated. Each sandbox has its own local scheduler, and threads must communicate using message passing with those in remote sandboxes. Similarly, address spaces may need to be migrated between sandboxes, to ensure newly forked processes do not violate the feasibility of existing local task schedules. Migration may also be needed to move a thread closer to its required resources, such as I/O devices that are not directly available in the local sandbox. This paper describes how Quest-V performs real-time communication and migration without violating service guarantees for existing threads.

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Background
Background

I enjoy low level programming: kernels, systems programming, robotics, etc. I prefer C or assembly but I can do C++ (well C++ from around the year 2000) and if I have to make a GUI application C#. Prefer Linux over Windows and prefer my own OS over Linux. I enjoy being challenged, especially when it comes to interacting with hardware. I find only a few things more satisfying than getting that one bit correct which makes the entire thing run because the hardware says that bit has to be that way. Don't get me wrong its maddening up to the point when you fix it, and you start to try to convince yourself that the hardware is broken, and a few rare times it is, but getting it to finally work is extremely satisfying.

I enjoy low level programming: kernels, systems programming, robotics, etc. I prefer C or assembly but I can do C++ (well C++ from around the year 2000) and if I have to make a GUI application C#. Prefer Linux over Windows and prefer my own OS over Linux. I enjoy being challenged, especially when it comes to interacting with hardware. I find only a few things more satisfying than getting that one bit correct which makes the entire thing run because the hardware says that bit has to be that way. Don't get me wrong its maddening up to the point when you fix it, and you start to try to convince yourself that the hardware is broken, and a few rare times it is, but getting it to finally work is extremely satisfying.

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Education Sep 2010 → Sep 2017
Ph.D. Computer Science, Boston University

Developed a real-time USB subsystem for our custom real-time operating system Quest. I have also developed a mixed-criticality scheduling approach (IO-AMC) that considers I/O tasks as well as application tasks. My thesis is on fault tolerance, including both the previously mentioned mixed-criticality and a triple modular redundancy approach that uses virtualization to ensure that a soft errors isolated to a single virtual machine cannot affect the system as a whole.

Developed a real-time USB subsystem for our custom real-time operating system Quest. I have also developed a mixed-criticality scheduling approach (IO-AMC) that considers I/O tasks as well as application tasks. My thesis is on fault tolerance, including both the previously mentioned mixed-criticality and a triple modular redundancy approach that uses virtualization to ensure that a soft errors isolated to a single virtual machine cannot affect the system as a whole.

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Position Feb 2016 → Jun 2017 (1 year, 5 months)
Hypervisor Engineer at Barkly Protects, Inc

Responsible for hypervisor and Windows kernel filter driver development. I worked on a small team that developed a thin hypervisor for interposing on Windows system calls to do behavioral malware detection. Used Intel VT-x and EPT technology in the hypervisor implementation. Developed technology to trace program execution undetectable by typical malware anti-analysis techniques. Implemented runtime malware behavior detection in both the hypervisor and Windows kernel filter drivers. Developed the Barkly kernel filter driver framework for rapid development of new malware detection. Also developed the testing suite used to ensure the stability of the hypervisor and kernel drivers.

Responsible for hypervisor and Windows kernel filter driver development. I worked on a small team that developed a thin hypervisor for interposing on Windows system calls to do behavioral malware detection. Used Intel VT-x and EPT technology in the hypervisor implementation. Developed technology to trace program execution undetectable by typical malware anti-analysis techniques. Implemented runtime malware behavior detection in both the hypervisor and Windows kernel filter drivers. Developed the Barkly kernel filter driver framework for rapid development of new malware detection. Also developed the testing suite used to ensure the stability of the hypervisor and kernel drivers.

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Blogs or videos Jul 2016

Eric Missimer, Katherine Zhao, Richard West: "Mixed-Criticality Scheduling with I/O", Technical Report: arXiv:1512.07654, arXiv.org.

Abstract: This paper addresses the problem of scheduling tasks with different criticality levels in the presence of I/O requests. In mixed-criticality scheduling, higher criticality tasks are given precedence over those of lower criticality when it is impossible to guarantee the schedulability of all tasks. While mixed-criticality scheduling has gained attention in recent years, most approaches typically assume a periodic task model. This assumption does not always hold in practice, especially for real-time and embedded systems that perform I/O. For example, many tasks block on I/O requests until devices signal their completion via interrupts; both the arrival of interrupts and the waking of blocked tasks can be aperiodic. In our prior work, we developed a scheduling technique in the Quest real-time operating system, which integrates the time-budgeted management of I/O operations with Sporadic Server scheduling of tasks. This paper extends our previous scheduling approach with support for mixed-criticality tasks and I/O requests on the same processing core. Results show the effective schedulability of different task sets in the presence of I/O requests is superior in our approach compared to traditional methods that manage I/O using techniques such as Sporadic Servers.

Eric Missimer, Katherine Zhao, Richard West: "Mixed-Criticality Scheduling with I/O", Technical Report: arXiv:1512.07654, arXiv.org.

Abstract: This paper addresses the problem of scheduling tasks with different criticality levels in the presence of I/O requests. In mixed-criticality scheduling, higher criticality tasks are given precedence over those of lower criticality when it is impossible to guarantee the schedulability of all tasks. While mixed-criticality scheduling has gained attention in recent years, most approaches typically assume a periodic task model. This assumption does not always hold in practice, especially for real-time and embedded systems that perform I/O. For example, many tasks block on I/O requests until devices signal their completion via interrupts; both the arrival of interrupts and the waking of blocked tasks can be aperiodic. In our prior work, we developed a scheduling technique in the Quest real-time operating system, which integrates the time-budgeted management of I/O operations with Sporadic Server scheduling of tasks. This paper extends our previous scheduling approach with support for mixed-criticality tasks and I/O requests on the same processing core. Results show the effective schedulability of different task sets in the presence of I/O requests is superior in our approach compared to traditional methods that manage I/O using techniques such as Sporadic Servers.

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Position Jun 2015 → Aug 2015 (3 months)
Intern Software Engineer at Intel Corporation

For my summer internship at Intel I was responsible for porting the Quest operating system that I have worked on at Boston University to the Intel Edison board. This was a proof of concept to show how the Edison running Quest can be used for applications with hard real-time requirements that cannot be met with Linux. It involved modifying U-Boot to boot Quest instead of Linux. I also had to rewrite the portions of Quest that relied on ACPI to use the simple firmware interface (SFI) instead. I removed some dependencies we had on PC-compatible machines that were not present on the Edison (such as the PIT and PIC). Finally, I had to port the GPIO driver from Linux to Quest. The source code for both the modified U-Boot and Quest can be found on github.

For my summer internship at Intel I was responsible for porting the Quest operating system that I have worked on at Boston University to the Intel Edison board. This was a proof of concept to show how the Edison running Quest can be used for applications with hard real-time requirements that cannot be met with Linux. It involved modifying U-Boot to boot Quest instead of Linux. I also had to rewrite the portions of Quest that relied on ACPI to use the simple firmware interface (SFI) instead. I removed some dependencies we had on PC-compatible machines that were not present on the Edison (such as the PIT and PIC). Finally, I had to port the GPIO driver from Linux to Quest. The source code for both the modified U-Boot and Quest can be found on github.

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Open source May 2015 → Aug 2015 (4 months)

A modified version of U-Boot that supports booting the Quest real-time operating system on the Intel Edison board.

This is a fork of U-boot designed to boot the Quest operating system on the Intel Edison. Quest, being a multiboot compliant operating system, could not be booted via the traditional U-Boot like Linux can. Specifically Quest relies on the multiboot struct passed to the kernel at boot. In order to make Quest work with U-Boot I added to U-Boot a boot command that would load an ELF kernel and pass to the kernel a pointer to a multiboot struct. It is not complete in any way but is sufficient to boot Quest.

A modified version of U-Boot that supports booting the Quest real-time operating system on the Intel Edison board.

This is a fork of U-boot designed to boot the Quest operating system on the Intel Edison. Quest, being a multiboot compliant operating system, could not be booted via the traditional U-Boot like Linux can. Specifically Quest relies on the multiboot struct passed to the kernel at boot. In order to make Quest work with U-Boot I added to U-Boot a boot command that would load an ELF kernel and pass to the kernel a pointer to a multiboot struct. It is not complete in any way but is sufficient to boot Quest.

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Open source May 2015 → Aug 2015 (4 months)

A version of Quest modified to work with the Intel Edison board. It requires a U-Boot that has been modified to boot Quest

This is the result of my Intel internship where I ported Quest to the Intel Edison board. First I had to modify Quest to work with a modified U-Boot (see other project listing for the U-Boot variant). Since Quest at the time only worked on PC compatible machines that supported ACPI and the Edison is neither PC compatible nor does it support ACPI, I had to add support for Simple Firmware Interface (SFI) which is what the Edison uses instead of ACPI. Finally, I ported over the PCI GPIO driver from Linux to Quest so the GPIO on the Edison could be controlled via Quest.

A version of Quest modified to work with the Intel Edison board. It requires a U-Boot that has been modified to boot Quest

This is the result of my Intel internship where I ported Quest to the Intel Edison board. First I had to modify Quest to work with a modified U-Boot (see other project listing for the U-Boot variant). Since Quest at the time only worked on PC compatible machines that supported ACPI and the Edison is neither PC compatible nor does it support ACPI, I had to add support for Simple Firmware Interface (SFI) which is what the Edison uses instead of ACPI. Finally, I ported over the PCI GPIO driver from Linux to Quest so the GPIO on the Edison could be controlled via Quest.

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Blogs or videos Jul 2015

A place for me to write about software and computers.

A place for me to write about software and computers.

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Position May 2014 → Nov 2014 (7 months)
Intern Member of Technical Staff in the Office of the CTO at VMware Inc.

Worked on ESXi, VMware's flagship product, specifically the on the VMKernel and VProbes. VProbes allows a VM guest or ESXi to be instrumented during run-time to observe and collect data about ESXi or a guest. It is similar to Linux Kprobes.

Worked on ESXi, VMware's flagship product, specifically the on the VMKernel and VProbes. VProbes allows a VM guest or ESXi to be instrumented during run-time to observe and collect data about ESXi or a guest. It is similar to Linux Kprobes.

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Open source Jun 2013 → Jun 2013 (1 month)

The Trivial Trivial File Transfer Protocol Server

Creator. I developed ttftp-server as a replacement for dnsmasq to speed up development for the Quest real-time operating system. We used TFTP as a filesystem when we PXE booted Quest and to make the filesystem faster I developed ttftp-server. It is very limited in features: it can only handle one client at a time, can only handle read requests, and only the blksize option, but it was sufficient at the time to get things moving faster. Ultimately, I stopped working on the project as we decided to use a ramdisk that was loaded by GRUB.

The Trivial Trivial File Transfer Protocol Server

Creator. I developed ttftp-server as a replacement for dnsmasq to speed up development for the Quest real-time operating system. We used TFTP as a filesystem when we PXE booted Quest and to make the filesystem faster I developed ttftp-server. It is very limited in features: it can only handle one client at a time, can only handle read requests, and only the blksize option, but it was sufficient at the time to get things moving faster. Ultimately, I stopped working on the project as we decided to use a ramdisk that was loaded by GRUB.

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Education 2007 → 2010
B.A. Computer Science, Boston University

Graduated magna cum laude. I also took multiple graduate level classes include computer graphics, operating systems, computer theory, machine learning, data mining and computer vision. In addition I developed a computer vision technique to track the eye movements of individuals using a standard USB camera. This allows severally disabled individuals to interact with a computer by moving their head to move the mouse and blink or wink to control mouse clicks.

Graduated magna cum laude. I also took multiple graduate level classes include computer graphics, operating systems, computer theory, machine learning, data mining and computer vision. In addition I developed a computer vision technique to track the eye movements of individuals using a standard USB camera. This allows severally disabled individuals to interact with a computer by moving their head to move the mouse and blink or wink to control mouse clicks.

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