Theodoros Chatzigiannakis

MEng, Electrical and Computer Engineering
Eindhoven, Netherlands
https://tchatzigiannakis.com/
TChatzigiannakis
Last active on Stack Overflow today

I was taught computer programming at school, at the age of 10. I then got a degree in electrical and computer engineering.

I'm comfortable with a number of areas of software development. Languages and technologies I have used so far include C# and F# in the .NET Framework (including CIL, WPF, WinForms, ASP.NET MVC, Entity Framework), C, C++, LLVM, ANTLR, HTML/CSS/JS, Java, OpenCL, 8085/8086/80386 assembler languages. Currently, I'm in the process of learning Rust and Haskell.

I occasionally make contributions to open source projects, which can mostly be found via my GitHub profile.

I have a special interest in matters of programming language design and implementation, such as static type systems (especially with uncommon features, like linear or dependent types), lexers and parsers, compilers, runtime environments, garbage collectors, and so on.

I have a personal blog where I write about software development and language design. I also have been a very active contributor on Stack Overflow with hundreds of well-received answers. Additionally, I have taught a number of novice and intermediate programmers, both on a 1-on-1 basis and in the context of my department's computer lab. I generally receive praise for my capacity for clear communication and for my teaching skills.

I was taught computer programming at school, at the age of 10. I then got a degree in electrical and computer engineering.

I'm comfortable with a number of areas of software development. Languages and technologies I have used so far include C# and F# in the .NET Framework (including CIL, WPF, WinForms, ASP.NET MVC, Entity Framework), C, C++, LLVM, ANTLR, HTML/CSS/JS, Java, OpenCL, 8085/8086/80386 assembler languages. Currently, I'm in the process of learning Rust and Haskell.

I occasionally make contributions to open source projects, which can mostly be found via my GitHub profile.

I have a special interest in matters of programming language design and implementation, such as static type systems (especially with uncommon features, like linear or dependent types), lexers and parsers, compilers, runtime environments, garbage collectors, and so on.

I have a personal blog where I write about software development and language design. I also have been a very active contributor on Stack Overflow with hundreds of well-received answers. Additionally, I have taught a number of novice and intermediate programmers, both on a 1-on-1 basis and in the context of my department's computer lab. I generally receive praise for my capacity for clear communication and for my teaching skills.

Favorite editor: VS Code
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Position Apr 2019 → Current (10 months)
Software Programmer at TOPIC Software Development B.V.
  • Worked on a couple of internal projects.
  • Currently a consultant at the R&D department of Canon Production Printing.
  • Worked on a couple of internal projects.
  • Currently a consultant at the R&D department of Canon Production Printing.

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Position 2016 → Current (4 years, 1 month)
Manager at Marea

General management of the business and development of internal software.

General management of the business and development of internal software.

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Open source Nov 2018 → Current (1 year, 3 months)
Last commit on Jan 06, 19
12 Commits / 983 ++ / 864 --

Greek translation of the book "The Rust Programming Language".

Greek translation of the book "The Rust Programming Language".

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Open source Aug 2018 → Current (1 year, 6 months)
Last commit on Jan 11, 19
139 Commits / 6,696 ++ / 4,823 --

A work-in-progress emulator of the Sega Master System.

A work-in-progress emulator of the Sega Master System.

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Open source Oct 2017 → Current (2 years, 4 months)
Last commit on Sep 12, 18
21 Commits / 239 ++ / 132 --

A fork of the InputSimulator library, with increased compatibility (scan code support) and other improvements.

A fork of the InputSimulator library, with increased compatibility (scan code support) and other improvements.

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Open source Apr 2015 → Current (4 years, 11 months)
Last commit on Oct 10, 18
3 Commits / 6,826 ++ / 577 --

Porting of parts of the LLVM C++ API to idiomatic C#.

Porting of parts of the LLVM C++ API to idiomatic C#.

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Background
Background

Member of the IEEE (2011-present)

  • IEEE Communications Society (2011)
  • IEEE Computer Society (2012-present)

Member of the IEEE (2011-present)

  • IEEE Communications Society (2011)
  • IEEE Computer Society (2012-present)

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Education 2007 → 2018
Master's Degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Patras, Greece
  • Wrote my thesis on searching for patterns in large biological databases using OpenCL.
  • Developed the tool described in the paper Transformation of Function Block Diagrams to UPPAAL timed automata for the verification of safety applications.
  • Provided computer lab assistance for the courses Object Oriented Programming and Advanced Programming Techniques (answering students' questions, debugging students' code) for 3 semesters.
  • Wrote my thesis on searching for patterns in large biological databases using OpenCL.
  • Developed the tool described in the paper Transformation of Function Block Diagrams to UPPAAL timed automata for the verification of safety applications.
  • Provided computer lab assistance for the courses Object Oriented Programming and Advanced Programming Techniques (answering students' questions, debugging students' code) for 3 semesters.

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Position Nov 2017 → Aug 2018 (10 months)
Private at Greek Army

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Assessment Jul 2018
Title: Java - Score: 275/300

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Assessment Feb 2018
Title: C# - Score: 279/300

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Blogs or videos Feb 2018

With this post, we will begin a series in which we will look at generics more closely, we will consider their implementation details across various languages, and we will explore their potential in solving problems we have today (with static analysis in mind).

With this post, we will begin a series in which we will look at generics more closely, we will consider their implementation details across various languages, and we will explore their potential in solving problems we have today (with static analysis in mind).

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Open source Dec 2017 → Dec 2017 (1 month)
Last commit on Dec 16, 17
5 Commits / 901 ++ / 167 --

Chrome extension that "locks" your pinned tabs to the website they're currently at, so you don't accidentally navigate away.

Chrome extension that "locks" your pinned tabs to the website they're currently at, so you don't accidentally navigate away.

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Blogs or videos Sep 2017

We examine a small example of code that invokes undefined behavior with potentially catastrophic consequences.

We examine a small example of code that invokes undefined behavior with potentially catastrophic consequences.

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Blogs or videos Aug 2017

In this post, we use pointers to mutate an object's type after construction and see what happens.

In this post, we use pointers to mutate an object's type after construction and see what happens.

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Blogs or videos May 2017

We explore a few strategies for implementing multiple dispatch polymorphism, as well as a few possible space optimizations.

We explore a few strategies for implementing multiple dispatch polymorphism, as well as a few possible space optimizations.

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Blogs or videos May 2017

We take a look at the usual implementation of single dispatch polymorphism in common object oriented languages.

We take a look at the usual implementation of single dispatch polymorphism in common object oriented languages.

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Blogs or videos Mar 2017

We look at several problems that substructural type systems can help us solve at compile time, in ways that common unrestricted type systems are simply unable to do.

We look at several problems that substructural type systems can help us solve at compile time, in ways that common unrestricted type systems are simply unable to do.

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Blogs or videos Feb 2017

Introduction to sequent calculus, structural rules, substructural logics and substructural type systems.

Introduction to sequent calculus, structural rules, substructural logics and substructural type systems.

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30
Top post Jan 2017

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Blogs or videos Jan 2017

In C#, ref is very limited. We explore the possibility of a Ref type that's less limited and still memory safe.

In C#, ref is very limited. We explore the possibility of a Ref type that's less limited and still memory safe.

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54
Top post May 2016

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8
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5
Top post Sep 2015

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Top post Dec 2014

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Project May 2012

Developed a tool to automate (in conjuction with UPPAAL) the process of safety verification of industrial automation systems.

I was credited in the acknowledgements section of the linked published paper.

Developed a tool to automate (in conjuction with UPPAAL) the process of safety verification of industrial automation systems.

I was credited in the acknowledgements section of the linked published paper.

Recommended reading

by MSDN Blogs

A blog post about a few special exceptions thrown by the CLR.

A blog post about a few special exceptions thrown by the CLR.

I blogged a while back about how “references” are often described as “addresses” when describing the semantics of the C# memory model. Though that’s arguably correct, it’s also arguably an…

I blogged a while back about how “references” are often described as “addresses” when describing the semantics of the C# memory model. Though that’s arguably correct, it’s also arguably an…

When you ask somebody what garbage collection is, the answer you get is probably going to be something along the lines of "Garbage collection is when the operating environment automatically reclaims memory that is no longer being used by the program. It does this by tracing memory starting from roots to identify which objects are accessible."

When you ask somebody what garbage collection is, the answer you get is probably going to be something along the lines of "Garbage collection is when the operating environment automatically reclaims memory that is no longer being used by the program. It does this by tracing memory starting from roots to identify which objects are accessible."

As we saw last time, garbage collection is a method for simulating an infinite amount of memory in a finite amount of memory. This simulation is performed by reclaiming memory once the environment can determine that the program wouldn't notice that the memory was reclaimed. There are a variety of mechanism for determining this. In a basic tracing collector, this determination is made by taking the objects which the program has definite references to, then tracing references from those objects, contining transitively until all accessible objects are found. But what looks like a definite reference in your code may not actually be a definite reference in the virtual machine: Just because a variable is in scope doesn't mean that it is live.

As we saw last time, garbage collection is a method for simulating an infinite amount of memory in a finite amount of memory. This simulation is performed by reclaiming memory once the environment can determine that the program wouldn't notice that the memory was reclaimed. There are a variety of mechanism for determining this. In a basic tracing collector, this determination is made by taking the objects which the program has definite references to, then tracing references from those objects, contining transitively until all accessible objects are found. But what looks like a definite reference in your code may not actually be a definite reference in the virtual machine: Just because a variable is in scope doesn't mean that it is live.

To summarize, it may appear that according to the letter of modern C standards, it is only dangerous to use uninitialized variables, instead of very dangerous. Nevertheless, this post shows that it does not matter what the standards say: compilers will bite you even when you are arguably right.

To summarize, it may appear that according to the letter of modern C standards, it is only dangerous to use uninitialized variables, instead of very dangerous. Nevertheless, this post shows that it does not matter what the standards say: compilers will bite you even when you are arguably right.

LLVM bitcode includes a notion of data types. These are used to control implicitly the size and encoding of values generated by various operations, to hint about mappings to underlying machine data types (e.g. on architectures that distinguish floating-point from integer registers) and to implicitly cause certain transformations to be effected, such as padding or sign extension. (I'm not yet sure whether all such operations need to be explicitly rendered as an LLVM “bitcast” operation or not. At least, LLVM's notion of types can be used to define validity of these operations, whether or not they happen implicitly.)

LLVM bitcode includes a notion of data types. These are used to control implicitly the size and encoding of values generated by various operations, to hint about mappings to underlying machine data types (e.g. on architectures that distinguish floating-point from integer registers) and to implicitly cause certain transformations to be effected, such as padding or sign extension. (I'm not yet sure whether all such operations need to be explicitly rendered as an LLVM “bitcast” operation or not. At least, LLVM's notion of types can be used to define validity of these operations, whether or not they happen implicitly.)

This blog post (the first in a series of three) tries to explain some of these issues so that you can better understand the tradeoffs and complexities involved, and perhaps learn a few more of the dark sides of C. It turns out that C is not a "high level assembler" like many experienced C programmers (particularly folks with a low-level focus) like to think, and that C++ and Objective-C have directly inherited plenty of issues from it.

This blog post (the first in a series of three) tries to explain some of these issues so that you can better understand the tradeoffs and complexities involved, and perhaps learn a few more of the dark sides of C. It turns out that C is not a "high level assembler" like many experienced C programmers (particularly folks with a low-level focus) like to think, and that C++ and Objective-C have directly inherited plenty of issues from it.

by David Walker
by Jesse A. Tov, Ricardo Pucella
by Keith Wansbrough, Simon Peyton Jones
by David Chisnall

Your computer is not a fast PDP-11.

Your computer is not a fast PDP-11.