Hi-Angel

Software Developer at Bauman Moscow State Technical University
Russia
Hi-Angel

I have vast knowledge and interest in low-level stuff, e.g. systems internals, both theoretic and practical ones (mostly GNU/Linux); drivers and kernel architecture, structures of processes and some binary executable formats; understanding of multithreading caveats like CPU cache and memory barriers, CPU scheduling implications, and out-of-order execution; decent in debugging and reverse-engineering.

Programming languages I can code in, ordered from most to least knowledgeable: C++, C# (I'd prefer not to use this one), C, Python, Haskell, Bash, Rust, Elisp, Vala. Programming languages that would require to refresh my skills (e.g. either those I just dabbled with, or ones I haven't used for a long time), same order: MiniZinc, Lua, Pascal/Delphi, PHP, Basic.

Most notable publicly available records I'd point out:

  1. StackOverflow profile
  2. I am the creator of IMPP (protocol used by Trillian) plugin for pidgin.
  3. My commits to userspace graphics drivers (FTR, the lastname inconsistency is that the first commit have had it wrong, and then patchwork site has somehow cached it).
  4. My commits to libinput (it's a modern library for handling HID devices which resides between kernel and Xorg/Compositors).
  5. I was actively contributing to Geary mail client.
  6. I have contributed a lot to Emacs plugin color-identifiers-mode.
  7. I contributed to yi-editor, a Emacs/Vim clone written in Haskell.
  8. I contributed to Way-Cooler, a Wayland compositor. As part of my work I learned a lot about nuances of Wayland protocol (the Compositor consisted of two processes, and I was focusing on a custom Wayland-based protocol for these two to commnunicate. That work didn't get upstreamed though: I got the code, but stumbled upon some nuances that didn't get resolved due to lack of spare time)
  9. I contributed to Sway, a Wayland compositor. Most notable contribution is plumbing through the support for per-window keyboard layout.
  10. I have an assignment with FSF for contributing to GNU Emacs, and contributed patches there
  11. I have an assignment with FSF for contributing to GNU Libc (Though you won't see me in the Glibc contributors list because my patches to Glibc got lost due to lack of reply by maintainers)
  12. I have an account on a popular russian site habrahabr (it is an IT-blog, where getting a non-read-only account requires writing a worthwhile article to get an invite. Which I did ☺).

I also have lots of occasional patches to many other projects, that are probably not worth linking here due to small number of commits.

I'm interested in influencing GNU/Linux ecosystem, e.g. working on projects partially or fully targeting GNU/Linux.

Contacts

Besides StackOverflow you can also write me a mail to hi-angelatyandex.ru, or send a message on IRC Freenode (when I'm there).

I have vast knowledge and interest in low-level stuff, e.g. systems internals, both theoretic and practical ones (mostly GNU/Linux); drivers and kernel architecture, structures of processes and some binary executable formats; understanding of multithreading caveats like CPU cache and memory barriers, CPU scheduling implications, and out-of-order execution; decent in debugging and reverse-engineering.

Programming languages I can code in, ordered from most to least knowledgeable: C++, C# (I'd prefer not to use this one), C, Python, Haskell, Bash, Rust, Elisp, Vala. Programming languages that would require to refresh my skills (e.g. either those I just dabbled with, or ones I haven't used for a long time), same order: MiniZinc, Lua, Pascal/Delphi, PHP, Basic.

Most notable publicly available records I'd point out:

  1. StackOverflow profile
  2. I am the creator of IMPP (protocol used by Trillian) plugin for pidgin.
  3. My commits to userspace graphics drivers (FTR, the lastname inconsistency is that the first commit have had it wrong, and then patchwork site has somehow cached it).
  4. My commits to libinput (it's a modern library for handling HID devices which resides between kernel and Xorg/Compositors).
  5. I was actively contributing to Geary mail client.
  6. I have contributed a lot to Emacs plugin color-identifiers-mode.
  7. I contributed to yi-editor, a Emacs/Vim clone written in Haskell.
  8. I contributed to Way-Cooler, a Wayland compositor. As part of my work I learned a lot about nuances of Wayland protocol (the Compositor consisted of two processes, and I was focusing on a custom Wayland-based protocol for these two to commnunicate. That work didn't get upstreamed though: I got the code, but stumbled upon some nuances that didn't get resolved due to lack of spare time)
  9. I contributed to Sway, a Wayland compositor. Most notable contribution is plumbing through the support for per-window keyboard layout.
  10. I have an assignment with FSF for contributing to GNU Emacs, and contributed patches there
  11. I have an assignment with FSF for contributing to GNU Libc (Though you won't see me in the Glibc contributors list because my patches to Glibc got lost due to lack of reply by maintainers)
  12. I have an account on a popular russian site habrahabr (it is an IT-blog, where getting a non-read-only account requires writing a worthwhile article to get an invite. Which I did ☺).

I also have lots of occasional patches to many other projects, that are probably not worth linking here due to small number of commits.

I'm interested in influencing GNU/Linux ecosystem, e.g. working on projects partially or fully targeting GNU/Linux.

Contacts

Besides StackOverflow you can also write me a mail to hi-angelatyandex.ru, or send a message on IRC Freenode (when I'm there).

Favorite editor: emacs
This user is part of the top 20% Stack Overflow answerers in these technologies
top
20%
This user is part of the top 30% Stack Overflow answerers in this technology
top
30%

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Position Feb 2018 → Current (3 years, 6 months)
c++ c++17 c python filesystems reed-solomon crush linux git gitlab continuous-integration meson-build gnu-make cereal networking

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Open source Jan 2019 → Current (2 years, 8 months)
Last commit on Apr 04, 21
13 Commits / 227 ++ / 85 --

A library to slow down games, to be loaded with LD_PRELOAD

A library to slow down games, to be loaded with LD_PRELOAD

rust code-injection embedding linux

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Open source Dec 2017 → Current (3 years, 9 months)
Last commit on Apr 13, 20
110 Commits / 3,979 ++ / 1,521 --

Trillian IMPP plugin for libpurple

Trillian IMPP plugin for libpurple

reverse-engineering c++ c++17 libpurple networking meson communication cereal

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Position Feb 2014 → Aug 2017 (3 years, 7 months)
Software Developer at Energomera
c++ c# bash linux windows svn vim emacs at-command

Development and maintenance of an app for updating some internal software, files transmission, and configuration needs. The app is using TCP/IP, serial ports, and GSM. It comprises a desktop client with GUI written in C#, and a server to run on embedded devices, written in C++.

It's been a tougher experience than it sounds, as α) over the run requirements been dramatically changing multiple times, and β) the software had to rely upon quite a few other layers. As an example of α — it should've been a short-term project for updating some other soft, but then appeared need for downloading logs, and some other features, which not only required "adding a new functional", but also figuring out how to deal with lots of existing devices where the older version is deployed. As an example of β: if communication problems been appearing, it was hard to tell if it's an intermediate server, or an application that my server had to connect to, or my server, or the bad connection per se. Lots of tricks been required.

It brought me lots of experience. E.g. later when I created IMPP plugin for Pidgin, I figured to spend a few days on a code to print packets in human-readable format, which then proved to be immensely useful for debugging and reverse-engineering.

Occasionally I've been involved in other projects too.

Development and maintenance of an app for updating some internal software, files transmission, and configuration needs. The app is using TCP/IP, serial ports, and GSM. It comprises a desktop client with GUI written in C#, and a server to run on embedded devices, written in C++.

It's been a tougher experience than it sounds, as α) over the run requirements been dramatically changing multiple times, and β) the software had to rely upon quite a few other layers. As an example of α — it should've been a short-term project for updating some other soft, but then appeared need for downloading logs, and some other features, which not only required "adding a new functional", but also figuring out how to deal with lots of existing devices where the older version is deployed. As an example of β: if communication problems been appearing, it was hard to tell if it's an intermediate server, or an application that my server had to connect to, or my server, or the bad connection per se. Lots of tricks been required.

It brought me lots of experience. E.g. later when I created IMPP plugin for Pidgin, I figured to spend a few days on a code to print packets in human-readable format, which then proved to be immensely useful for debugging and reverse-engineering.

Occasionally I've been involved in other projects too.

Are you sure you want to do that?

Cancel Yes, delete it
Joined Stack Overflow
on May 16, 2013