Wayne Werner

Senior Software Engineer
Greenwood, AR, United States
https://www.waynewerner.com waynew
Last active on Stack Overflow today
Favorite editor: vi and any derivative thereof • First computer: Apple Macintosh
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Position Jan 2019 → Current (7 months)
Senior Software Engineer I at SaltStack
  • Took responsibility for managing enhancement proposals
  • Fixed bugs in Salt
  • Interacted with community
  • Participated and encouraged code reviews
  • Assisted in troubleshooting and brainstorming
  • Produced content for SaltAir
  • Took responsibility for managing enhancement proposals
  • Fixed bugs in Salt
  • Interacted with community
  • Participated and encouraged code reviews
  • Assisted in troubleshooting and brainstorming
  • Produced content for SaltAir

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Open source Mar 2017 → Current (2 years, 5 months)
Last commit on Oct 01, 18
20 Commits / 1,493 ++ / 354 --

Command line GTD tool

Command line GTD tool

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Open source Jul 2016 → Current (3 years, 1 month)
Last commit on Jun 01, 19
5 Commits / 64 ++ / 50 --

I help maintain a reimplementation of the Python stdlib smtpd.py based on asyncio.

I help maintain a reimplementation of the Python stdlib smtpd.py based on asyncio.

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Open source Jan 2014 → Current (5 years, 7 months)

A simple Flask app for publishing Pelican blags from Draft (http://draftin.com)

Creator/Author/Writer/Publisher

A simple Flask app for publishing Pelican blags from Draft (http://draftin.com)

Creator/Author/Writer/Publisher

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Open source Aug 2013 → Current (6 years)

this: http://xkcd.com/936/

Inspired Creator

this: http://xkcd.com/936/

Inspired Creator

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Open source Feb 2013 → Current (6 years, 5 months)

Random blockus piece queue. Also maybe some other random blockus related musings.

Author and proprietor

Random blockus piece queue. Also maybe some other random blockus related musings.

Author and proprietor

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Blogs or videos

I am spoiled rotten. Starting around my second semester at University of Central Arkansas I began teaching myself #Python.…

I am spoiled rotten. Starting around my second semester at University of Central Arkansas I began teaching myself #Python.…

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Background
Background

I like to tell people that my introduction to programming was with the advent of the World Wide Web. I was in 9th grade, and had just created my very own webpage on Angelfire. I used their built-in form tool to set the title, background image, and put text on the page. I was so proud of it that I sent my older brother, then a freshman Computer Science major, a link. After a bit of discussion he recommended that I learn HTML. So off to AltaVista I went (this was before Google - when "everyone" thought that AOL was the internet). A few HTML tutorials later, I was in love with "programming". When my brother came home he showed me how to write a program (a guessing game was my choice) in Perl. I was hooked, though I didn't know it. He also showed me this crazy editor called "vim" - I was supposed to do this vimtutor thing so I could learn how to use it. After a couple of programming courses at the local vo-tech college that I took as part of my Homeschool curriculum, I turned to PHP on my own. We were running a Red Hat GNU/Linux install to route our four (including the Linux box) computers through our dial-up connection. We also put a web server (Apache + PHP) (including SSH) there, so I had easy access to PHP. Those were the heady days of AOL Instant Messenger, and I converted my guessing game to be able to run (in PHP) in the AIM Information box.

A few years later I began my career at the University of Central Arkansas as a Computer Science major. I've learned tons about life in general from my other courses, and a little bit about programming from my programming courses. Usually I go ahead an learn ahead of time on my own the concepts that are taught in later courses, though I've learned a lot of the lower level concepts. I taught myself Python on the side, and for two years in a row I've been a top contributer to the tutor@python.org mailing list. Answering questions has helped me learn the language and other concepts a lot better than I would have just learning on my own.

Well, in May 2010 I finally realized the beginning of my dream - to get paid to program. I began work as a summer intern at the Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department, and have been pleased that I was right. I absolutely LOVE to program for a living. I have certainly accomplished quite a bit in the past few weeks, but I can honestly say I don't believe I've worked a single day because I find programming such a joy. We are, however, a "Microsoft shop" which I find means that we don't always use the correct tool for the job. Even if a FLOSS solution would solve the problem easier and better, we still use a Microsoft product. It's a trade-off, of course -- we trade build time and sometimes complexity for a unified/standardized approach. I've also learned Visual Basic and I discovered that as a language it's been designed to make the lexing and parsing of the language easier on the team building the compiler -- not to make the language/syntax ideal for the programmer.

I like to tell people that my introduction to programming was with the advent of the World Wide Web. I was in 9th grade, and had just created my very own webpage on Angelfire. I used their built-in form tool to set the title, background image, and put text on the page. I was so proud of it that I sent my older brother, then a freshman Computer Science major, a link. After a bit of discussion he recommended that I learn HTML. So off to AltaVista I went (this was before Google - when "everyone" thought that AOL was the internet). A few HTML tutorials later, I was in love with "programming". When my brother came home he showed me how to write a program (a guessing game was my choice) in Perl. I was hooked, though I didn't know it. He also showed me this crazy editor called "vim" - I was supposed to do this vimtutor thing so I could learn how to use it. After a couple of programming courses at the local vo-tech college that I took as part of my Homeschool curriculum, I turned to PHP on my own. We were running a Red Hat GNU/Linux install to route our four (including the Linux box) computers through our dial-up connection. We also put a web server (Apache + PHP) (including SSH) there, so I had easy access to PHP. Those were the heady days of AOL Instant Messenger, and I converted my guessing game to be able to run (in PHP) in the AIM Information box.

A few years later I began my career at the University of Central Arkansas as a Computer Science major. I've learned tons about life in general from my other courses, and a little bit about programming from my programming courses. Usually I go ahead an learn ahead of time on my own the concepts that are taught in later courses, though I've learned a lot of the lower level concepts. I taught myself Python on the side, and for two years in a row I've been a top contributer to the tutor@python.org mailing list. Answering questions has helped me learn the language and other concepts a lot better than I would have just learning on my own.

Well, in May 2010 I finally realized the beginning of my dream - to get paid to program. I began work as a summer intern at the Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department, and have been pleased that I was right. I absolutely LOVE to program for a living. I have certainly accomplished quite a bit in the past few weeks, but I can honestly say I don't believe I've worked a single day because I find programming such a joy. We are, however, a "Microsoft shop" which I find means that we don't always use the correct tool for the job. Even if a FLOSS solution would solve the problem easier and better, we still use a Microsoft product. It's a trade-off, of course -- we trade build time and sometimes complexity for a unified/standardized approach. I've also learned Visual Basic and I discovered that as a language it's been designed to make the lexing and parsing of the language easier on the team building the compiler -- not to make the language/syntax ideal for the programmer.

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Position Mar 2018 → Sep 2018 (7 months)
Senior Software Engineer at SketchDeck, Inc.
  • Drove start of migration from Coffescript 1 to JavaScript (with later goals for TypeScript)
  • Helped drive improvements to automated testing
  • Took initiative in driving security improvements
  • Improved product implementation and design using a mix of JavaScript and Coffeescript
  • Drove start of migration from Coffescript 1 to JavaScript (with later goals for TypeScript)
  • Helped drive improvements to automated testing
  • Took initiative in driving security improvements
  • Improved product implementation and design using a mix of JavaScript and Coffeescript

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Position Mar 2015 → Jan 2018 (2 years, 11 months)
Software Engineer at Softgate Systems, Inc.
  • Ported legacy code to Python 3
  • Migrated one-off reports to maintainable Python code
  • Promoted and led implementation of Salt Stack so we can have Phoenix Servers.
  • Improved documentation
  • Implemented Buildbot installation via salt for CI
  • Ported legacy code to Python 3
  • Migrated one-off reports to maintainable Python code
  • Promoted and led implementation of Salt Stack so we can have Phoenix Servers.
  • Improved documentation
  • Implemented Buildbot installation via salt for CI

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Position Nov 2013 → Mar 2015 (1 year, 5 months)
Software Engineer at LWSI, Inc.
  • Taught other developers good git practices.
  • Payed down technical debts.
  • Protected other developers' time by interfacing with management.
  • Promoted code reviews/quality standards.
  • Experimented with and promoted adoption of new technology.
  • Improved the development pipeline (devops)
  • Wrote automated tests and encouraged team to do the same.
  • Encouraged positive attitudes in the face of negativity.

Notable accomplishments:

  • Implemented the Direct communications protocol.
  • Replaced bloated non-working .NET application with a Python reactor pattern implementation.
  • Developed Meaningful Use Phase 2 Tested Patient Portal.

Why I Am Awesome At My Job:

  • My knowledge of various tech means I am the go-to for questions about technology, and my passion for education helps me share that knowledge across various teams in the organization.
  • Known for solving particularly nasty problems, if there is a technically challenging problem, like converting data in Java (including images) to ZPL for printing on a Zebra thermal armband printer, or trying to figure out why this legacy code that is actually RPG written with Java syntax and is N-tiered tightly coupled and strangely enough has problems, it comes to me. And I solve it.
  • Volunteering for hard things that make me stretch. For instance, when our head of IT had a stroke, the project he was heading would have foundered. I stepped up, even though the entire problem domain (financials/accounting) was outside of my expertise.
  • I continually push for improvements to our workflow - using Jenkins for CI, better use of Git, Semantic Versioning, adopting Docker, using Maven/Ant appropriately, etc.
  • Taught other developers good git practices.
  • Payed down technical debts.
  • Protected other developers' time by interfacing with management.
  • Promoted code reviews/quality standards.
  • Experimented with and promoted adoption of new technology.
  • Improved the development pipeline (devops)
  • Wrote automated tests and encouraged team to do the same.
  • Encouraged positive attitudes in the face of negativity.

Notable accomplishments:

  • Implemented the Direct communications protocol.
  • Replaced bloated non-working .NET application with a Python reactor pattern implementation.
  • Developed Meaningful Use Phase 2 Tested Patient Portal.

Why I Am Awesome At My Job:

  • My knowledge of various tech means I am the go-to for questions about technology, and my passion for education helps me share that knowledge across various teams in the organization.
  • Known for solving particularly nasty problems, if there is a technically challenging problem, like converting data in Java (including images) to ZPL for printing on a Zebra thermal armband printer, or trying to figure out why this legacy code that is actually RPG written with Java syntax and is N-tiered tightly coupled and strangely enough has problems, it comes to me. And I solve it.
  • Volunteering for hard things that make me stretch. For instance, when our head of IT had a stroke, the project he was heading would have foundered. I stepped up, even though the entire problem domain (financials/accounting) was outside of my expertise.
  • I continually push for improvements to our workflow - using Jenkins for CI, better use of Git, Semantic Versioning, adopting Docker, using Maven/Ant appropriately, etc.

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Blogs or videos Jan 2014

On politics and programming

On politics and programming

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Position Jun 2011 → Nov 2013 (2 years, 6 months)
  • Took responsibility for design, implementation, test, and delivery of a generic full stack process that was used in at least one large application.
  • Supported team lead, learned, understood, and evangelized Scrum/agile processes.
  • Took an active role in learning and promoting Test-Driven development
  • Researched tools and processes that will help improve productivity, especially tools for continuous integration.

As half of two-person team:

  • Shared responsibility for requirements gathering, project design, development, and delivery of a project replacing a legacy system.
  • Took initiative in designing data structures that made fulfilling the requirements much easier.
  • Took responsibility for design, implementation, test, and delivery of a generic full stack process that was used in at least one large application.
  • Supported team lead, learned, understood, and evangelized Scrum/agile processes.
  • Took an active role in learning and promoting Test-Driven development
  • Researched tools and processes that will help improve productivity, especially tools for continuous integration.

As half of two-person team:

  • Shared responsibility for requirements gathering, project design, development, and delivery of a project replacing a legacy system.
  • Took initiative in designing data structures that made fulfilling the requirements much easier.

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Blogs or videos Nov 2012

Short post about mental models and mp3 players that are not cameras.

Short post about mental models and mp3 players that are not cameras.

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Education 2007 → Dec 2011
B.S. Computer Science, University of Central Arkansas

Graduated Cum Laude

Dean's List:

  • Spring 07 - 4.0 GPA
  • Spring 08 - 4.0 GPA
  • Fall 08 - 3.8 GPA
  • Spring 10 - 3.9 GPA

President of the Computer Science Club Fall 2010-Spring 2011

Participation in ACM and Acxiom programming competitions

Graduated Cum Laude

Dean's List:

  • Spring 07 - 4.0 GPA
  • Spring 08 - 4.0 GPA
  • Fall 08 - 3.8 GPA
  • Spring 10 - 3.9 GPA

President of the Computer Science Club Fall 2010-Spring 2011

Participation in ACM and Acxiom programming competitions

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52
Top post Aug 2010

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Position May 2010 → Aug 2010 (4 months)
Programmer Intern at Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department

I was responsible for writing an entire program from web-GUI front-end to the database backend (though the database itself was not, strictly speaking, mine). As a "Microsoft Shop", so I was required to write the program in a .NET language. Since I already knew Java, and C# syntax is fairly similar, I chose to use Visual Basic so I could learn something new. Some of the requirements were already specified, but nothing was really documented. I documented the project and specifications, developed the application according to specifications, and ultimately delivered a working project that will probably stand many, many years.

I was responsible for writing an entire program from web-GUI front-end to the database backend (though the database itself was not, strictly speaking, mine). As a "Microsoft Shop", so I was required to write the program in a .NET language. Since I already knew Java, and C# syntax is fairly similar, I chose to use Visual Basic so I could learn something new. Some of the requirements were already specified, but nothing was really documented. I documented the project and specifications, developed the application according to specifications, and ultimately delivered a working project that will probably stand many, many years.

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62
Top post Jul 2010

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63
Top post Jul 2010

Recommended reading

by Scott Berkun

The word innovation is overused. There are really few actual innovations. People/companies should stop using the word unless they really are innovating.

The word innovation is overused. There are really few actual innovations. People/companies should stop using the word unless they really are innovating.

by Douglas Crockford

JavaScript is not actually a bad language. As long as you keep to the safe parts of the path, life can be good.

JavaScript is not actually a bad language. As long as you keep to the safe parts of the path, life can be good.

by Randal Schwartz, Tom Phoenix, brian d foy

This book was actually incredibly entertaining. I (re-)learned that Perl is pretty awesome, but it can also do some bad things if you don't know or pay attention to what you're doing, and in what order.

This book was actually incredibly entertaining. I (re-)learned that Perl is pretty awesome, but it can also do some bad things if you don't know or pay attention to what you're doing, and in what order.

by Steven Bird, Ewan Klein, Edward Loper

If I have to do any kind of NLP, I will first pip install nltk. Then I will reach for this book.

If I have to do any kind of NLP, I will first pip install nltk. Then I will reach for this book.

by Mark Lutz

Python is awesome - but I knew that already. It's a great reference book for Python.

Python is awesome - but I knew that already. It's a great reference book for Python.