Favorite editor: Eclipse • First computer: Intel 80486
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Position Aug 2012 → Current (8 years)
Research Assistant in Artificial Intelligence (PhD) at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Working on large-scale machine learning and natural language processing with applications to healthcare and MOOCs.

Working on large-scale machine learning and natural language processing with applications to healthcare and MOOCs.

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Feature or Apps

Source: https://github.com/FrankyRP/planet-wars Official website: http://ai-contest.com/ Games history: http://ai-contest.com/profile.php?user_id=12422

Planet Wars is a game based on Galcon, but is designed to be a simpler target for bots. The contest version of the game is for two players. A game of Planet Wars takes place on a map which contains several planets, each of which has some number of ships on it. Each planet may have a different number of ships. The planets may belong to one of three different owners: you, your opponent, or neutral. The game has a certain maximum number of turns. At the time of this writing, the maximum number of turns on the official server is 200, but it is not yet a part of the specification. Provided that neither player performs an invalid action, the player with the most ships at the end of the game wins. The game may also end earlier if one of the players loses all his ships, in which case the player that has ships remaining wins instantly. If both players have the same number of ships when the game ends, it’s a draw.

This bot was ranked amongst the top 10%.

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Source: https://github.com/FrankyRP/planet-wars Official website: http://ai-contest.com/ Games history: http://ai-contest.com/profile.php?user_id=12422

Planet Wars is a game based on Galcon, but is designed to be a simpler target for bots. The contest version of the game is for two players. A game of Planet Wars takes place on a map which contains several planets, each of which has some number of ships on it. Each planet may have a different number of ships. The planets may belong to one of three different owners: you, your opponent, or neutral. The game has a certain maximum number of turns. At the time of this writing, the maximum number of turns on the official server is 200, but it is not yet a part of the specification. Provided that neither player performs an invalid action, the player with the most ships at the end of the game wins. The game may also end earlier if one of the players loses all his ships, in which case the player that has ships remaining wins instantly. If both players have the same number of ships when the game ends, it’s a draw.

This bot was ranked amongst the top 10%.

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W4G Rating Bar is a MediaWiki extension which provides a page rating system. The rating bar can be either manually included on pages, using a parser function ({{#w4grb_rate}}), or automatically added at the bottom of all pages, by setting $wgW4GRB_Settings['auto-include'] to true. Various top-lists can then be generated.

Website: http://www.mediawiki.org/wiki/Extension:W4G_Rating_Bar

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W4G Rating Bar is a MediaWiki extension which provides a page rating system. The rating bar can be either manually included on pages, using a parser function ({{#w4grb_rate}}), or automatically added at the bottom of all pages, by setting $wgW4GRB_Settings['auto-include'] to true. Various top-lists can then be generated.

Website: http://www.mediawiki.org/wiki/Extension:W4G_Rating_Bar

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Sferes2 is a framework for evolutionary computation (EC) experiments and especially for evolutionary robotics (ER). Its main goal is to help researchers in EC and ER to efficiently try new ideas. Sferes2 has been inspired by sferes, another (older and no more maintained) framework for ER.

Sferes2 allows to design efficient programs on modern (multicore) computers: experiments typically require more than 24 hours of computation; in this situation it can be profitable to trade some complexity of implementation for some hours of computation. Nevertheless, the framework is designed to be as simple as possible.

  • Port for Windows
  • Various patches

Sferes2 is a framework for evolutionary computation (EC) experiments and especially for evolutionary robotics (ER). Its main goal is to help researchers in EC and ER to efficiently try new ideas. Sferes2 has been inspired by sferes, another (older and no more maintained) framework for ER.

Sferes2 allows to design efficient programs on modern (multicore) computers: experiments typically require more than 24 hours of computation; in this situation it can be profitable to trade some complexity of implementation for some hours of computation. Nevertheless, the framework is designed to be as simple as possible.

  • Port for Windows
  • Various patches

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Blogs or videos

Fuzzy logic is an extension of Boolean logic by Lotfi Zadeh in 1965 based on the mathematical theory of fuzzy sets, which is a generalization of classical set theory. By introducing the concept of degree in the verification of a condition, allowing a condition of being in a state other than true or false, fuzzy logic provides a very valuable flexibility to use reasoning, which makes it possible taking into account the inaccuracies and uncertainties. One of the advantages of fuzzy logic to formalize human reasoning is that the rules are set in natural language.

In this report, we will:

  • introduce the basic concepts of fuzzy logic,
  • propose some arguments which support the view that fuzzy logic can model human reasoning better than standard logic and probability theory,
  • conduct an psychological experiment on humans to see if their way of thinking can be reflected by fuzzy logic.

We show that fuzzy logic can explain many experiments that had undermined traditional models of human reasoning in the 20th century. We show how the non-additivity of probability judgments can be expressed in a fuzzy system. We then confront fuzzy logic with some paradoxes of classical logic when it tries to model human reasoning: the sorites paradox is typically the kind of threshold problem that fuzzy logic reduces and the paradox of entailment does not pose a problem in fuzzy logic. It would be interesting to further explore Hempel's paradox and especially how we could express it in a neuro-fuzzy system. Similarly, Wason selection task would require further analysis, this time by focusing on fuzzy modus ponens and modus tollens.

Thus fuzzy logic appears as a powerful theoretical framework for studying human reasoning. Surprisingly, we find only one study comparing the decisions made by humans with that of a fuzzy system, whose purpose was essentially to design a system of decision support for medical personnel, not analyze human reasoning as such. We conduct our own experiment and investigate whether a fuzzy system could mimic the results observed in humans. For this purpose, we use a technique for optimizing fuzzy system using neural networks (neuro-fuzzy), through which we obtain good results, although the correlation between the two criteria for entry is high: a fuzzy system gives results closer to experimental values than those obtained by a polynomial system. This result reinforces the hypothesis that fuzzy logic can be used to explain decisions from human reasoning.

Fuzzy logic is an extension of Boolean logic by Lotfi Zadeh in 1965 based on the mathematical theory of fuzzy sets, which is a generalization of classical set theory. By introducing the concept of degree in the verification of a condition, allowing a condition of being in a state other than true or false, fuzzy logic provides a very valuable flexibility to use reasoning, which makes it possible taking into account the inaccuracies and uncertainties. One of the advantages of fuzzy logic to formalize human reasoning is that the rules are set in natural language.

In this report, we will:

  • introduce the basic concepts of fuzzy logic,
  • propose some arguments which support the view that fuzzy logic can model human reasoning better than standard logic and probability theory,
  • conduct an psychological experiment on humans to see if their way of thinking can be reflected by fuzzy logic.

We show that fuzzy logic can explain many experiments that had undermined traditional models of human reasoning in the 20th century. We show how the non-additivity of probability judgments can be expressed in a fuzzy system. We then confront fuzzy logic with some paradoxes of classical logic when it tries to model human reasoning: the sorites paradox is typically the kind of threshold problem that fuzzy logic reduces and the paradox of entailment does not pose a problem in fuzzy logic. It would be interesting to further explore Hempel's paradox and especially how we could express it in a neuro-fuzzy system. Similarly, Wason selection task would require further analysis, this time by focusing on fuzzy modus ponens and modus tollens.

Thus fuzzy logic appears as a powerful theoretical framework for studying human reasoning. Surprisingly, we find only one study comparing the decisions made by humans with that of a fuzzy system, whose purpose was essentially to design a system of decision support for medical personnel, not analyze human reasoning as such. We conduct our own experiment and investigate whether a fuzzy system could mimic the results observed in humans. For this purpose, we use a technique for optimizing fuzzy system using neural networks (neuro-fuzzy), through which we obtain good results, although the correlation between the two criteria for entry is high: a fuzzy system gives results closer to experimental values than those obtained by a polynomial system. This result reinforces the hypothesis that fuzzy logic can be used to explain decisions from human reasoning.

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Blogs or videos

Fuzzy logic is based on solid mathematical foundations, including the mathematical theory of fuzzy sets, generalizing classical set theory. Firstly, we define fuzzy operators, which generalize operators of classical logic.

As a second step, we see how fuzzy logic can imitate human reasoning. We analyze the contribution of fuzzy logic for the modeling of human reasoning, and also experimentally investigate whether the decisions taken by humans correspond to decisions taken by fuzzy systems. To this end, given that the literature is deficient on this point, we design an experiment for that purpose and analyze the results.

We will then study the potential applications for databases and decision support systems in Chapter 5. How to integrate the advantages of fuzzy logic in the database? To which extent decision-making systems can use the flexibility of fuzzy logic?

We then study the potential applications for decision support systems and databases.

We show that at the heart of the company, bringing together all the interesting information from the operational databases, decision systems could benefit greatly from fuzzy logic by giving the keys to human reasoning, allowing to refine the decision-making.

Database theorists know what fuzzy logic could bring them in terms of information modeling: queries more intuitive and more powerful on the one hand, the data more consistent with the reality on the other. Many papers have been written, but few significant achievements have followed. The lack of consensus on a standard is probably the main reason behind.

Fuzzy logic is based on solid mathematical foundations, including the mathematical theory of fuzzy sets, generalizing classical set theory. Firstly, we define fuzzy operators, which generalize operators of classical logic.

As a second step, we see how fuzzy logic can imitate human reasoning. We analyze the contribution of fuzzy logic for the modeling of human reasoning, and also experimentally investigate whether the decisions taken by humans correspond to decisions taken by fuzzy systems. To this end, given that the literature is deficient on this point, we design an experiment for that purpose and analyze the results.

We will then study the potential applications for databases and decision support systems in Chapter 5. How to integrate the advantages of fuzzy logic in the database? To which extent decision-making systems can use the flexibility of fuzzy logic?

We then study the potential applications for decision support systems and databases.

We show that at the heart of the company, bringing together all the interesting information from the operational databases, decision systems could benefit greatly from fuzzy logic by giving the keys to human reasoning, allowing to refine the decision-making.

Database theorists know what fuzzy logic could bring them in terms of information modeling: queries more intuitive and more powerful on the one hand, the data more consistent with the reality on the other. Many papers have been written, but few significant achievements have followed. The lack of consensus on a standard is probably the main reason behind.

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Blogs or videos

The medial Reticular Formation (mRF) is located in the brainstem: it receives many sensory inputs and it can control motor actions through its projections on the spinal cord and cranial nerves. The mRF is phylogenetically one of the oldest neural structures of the brainstem, the latter being regarded as one of the oldest centers of the central nervous system. Subsequently it seems to be a low-level system for action selection.

The first model of the mRF was proposed by Kilmer and McCulloch in 1969, who already proposed that the mRF could be a "mode selector". In 2005, Humphries et al. (2005) tested the efficiency of this model in the minimal survival task defined in Girard et al. (2003). It performed poorly, but another version of it that included artificially evolved weights performed quite honorably. As a result, Humphries proposed a second model of the mRF, based on neural network formalism and taking into account new anatomical data. Nevertheless, it showed poor performances in the minimal survival task and turns out not to be anatomically very plausible.

In this Master's Thesis, we propose a new model of the mRF:

  • constrained by anatomical information about its structure,
  • constructed based on neural networks generated by artificial evolution,
  • assessed on tasks of action selection.

The model we obtain successfully manages the tasks of selection, indicating that the mRF can be used as an action selection system. We also demonstrate an anatomical property of the mRF, which coupled with the results of the paper Humphries et al. (2006) shows that it is very likely that the mRF network has a small-world structure.

This project was funded by the ANR (ANR-09-EMER-005-01. ANR = French National Agency for Research) in the project EvoNeuro.

The medial Reticular Formation (mRF) is located in the brainstem: it receives many sensory inputs and it can control motor actions through its projections on the spinal cord and cranial nerves. The mRF is phylogenetically one of the oldest neural structures of the brainstem, the latter being regarded as one of the oldest centers of the central nervous system. Subsequently it seems to be a low-level system for action selection.

The first model of the mRF was proposed by Kilmer and McCulloch in 1969, who already proposed that the mRF could be a "mode selector". In 2005, Humphries et al. (2005) tested the efficiency of this model in the minimal survival task defined in Girard et al. (2003). It performed poorly, but another version of it that included artificially evolved weights performed quite honorably. As a result, Humphries proposed a second model of the mRF, based on neural network formalism and taking into account new anatomical data. Nevertheless, it showed poor performances in the minimal survival task and turns out not to be anatomically very plausible.

In this Master's Thesis, we propose a new model of the mRF:

  • constrained by anatomical information about its structure,
  • constructed based on neural networks generated by artificial evolution,
  • assessed on tasks of action selection.

The model we obtain successfully manages the tasks of selection, indicating that the mRF can be used as an action selection system. We also demonstrate an anatomical property of the mRF, which coupled with the results of the paper Humphries et al. (2006) shows that it is very likely that the mRF network has a small-world structure.

This project was funded by the ANR (ANR-09-EMER-005-01. ANR = French National Agency for Research) in the project EvoNeuro.

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Background
Background

Honors and Awards: (AI stands for Artificial Intelligence)

  • 2011: [CS] GRE Computer Science: Top 10%
  • 2011: [AI] Ranked 2nd out of 43 in the CogMaster (Research Master in Cognitive Science at ENS Ulm). 1st in AI.
  • 2011: [AI] Ranked 2nd out of 50 in the Research Master in Computer Science at CNAM, with a specialization in AI.
  • 2011: [AI] DGA Outstanding Full Grant Award (DGA = French Department of Defense) for research in AI.
  • 2011: [AI] MATLAB Contest Spring 2011: Top 10% (Franck Dernoncourt)
  • 2010: [AI] Google AI Challenge Autumn 2010: Top 10% (FrankyRP)
  • 2009: [Hacking] NewbieContest: Top 1% (FrankyRP)
  • 2007: [Mathematics]: 1st in written exams in mathematics among 5,000 candidates in the HEC entrance examination.
  • 2006: [Misc] Best public speaker award for the 1st edition of SimONU, a United Nations simulation (circa 250 contestants).
  • 2005-2007: [Misc]: Ranked 2nd out of 46 each year at Lycée Henri IV.
  • 2005: [Mathematics] 1st position in Lycée Henri IV for the Mathematical Kangaroo, a popular competition.

Honors and Awards: (AI stands for Artificial Intelligence)

  • 2011: [CS] GRE Computer Science: Top 10%
  • 2011: [AI] Ranked 2nd out of 43 in the CogMaster (Research Master in Cognitive Science at ENS Ulm). 1st in AI.
  • 2011: [AI] Ranked 2nd out of 50 in the Research Master in Computer Science at CNAM, with a specialization in AI.
  • 2011: [AI] DGA Outstanding Full Grant Award (DGA = French Department of Defense) for research in AI.
  • 2011: [AI] MATLAB Contest Spring 2011: Top 10% (Franck Dernoncourt)
  • 2010: [AI] Google AI Challenge Autumn 2010: Top 10% (FrankyRP)
  • 2009: [Hacking] NewbieContest: Top 1% (FrankyRP)
  • 2007: [Mathematics]: 1st in written exams in mathematics among 5,000 candidates in the HEC entrance examination.
  • 2006: [Misc] Best public speaker award for the 1st edition of SimONU, a United Nations simulation (circa 250 contestants).
  • 2005-2007: [Misc]: Ranked 2nd out of 46 each year at Lycée Henri IV.
  • 2005: [Mathematics] 1st position in Lycée Henri IV for the Mathematical Kangaroo, a popular competition.

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Education 2012 → 2017
PhD computer science & artificial intelligence, MIT

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63
Top post Jan 2017

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Top post Dec 2016

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Position May 2015 → Sep 2015 (5 months)
NLP Research intern at Adobe

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338
Top post Jan 2015

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Position Jul 2011 → Aug 2012 (1 year, 2 months)
Research in Artificial Intelligence at Laboratoire d'Informatique de Paris 6

My project aimed at building conversational agents for serious games. It mostly makes use of semantics, ontology, natural language processing and knowledge representation.

Laboratoire d'Informatique de Paris 6 (LIP6) is a leading research institute for Computer Science in Paris.

My project aimed at building conversational agents for serious games. It mostly makes use of semantics, ontology, natural language processing and knowledge representation.

Laboratoire d'Informatique de Paris 6 (LIP6) is a leading research institute for Computer Science in Paris.

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Education 2009 → 2011
Research Master, ENS Ulm

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Education 2008 → 2011
Bachelor & Research Master, Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers

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Education 2007 → 2011
Bachelor & Master of Science, HEC School of Management

President of the Computer Science society (HEC Microsystems)

President of the Computer Science society (HEC Microsystems)

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Position Sep 2010 → Jun 2011 (10 months)
Research Intern in Artificial Intelligence at Institut des Systemes Intelligents et de Robotique

I built a computational neuroscience model of the reticular formation, a part of the brain which is involved in low-level decision making, using artificial neural networks optimized with evolutionary computation. I evaluated this model as a virtual mobile robot controller.

The report is available here: http://francky.me/publications.php

Theoretical tools: Evolutionary algorithms, artificial neural networks, robotics and computational neuroscience. Technologies: C++ (Boost, SDL), Python (Pygame), MATLAB

I built a computational neuroscience model of the reticular formation, a part of the brain which is involved in low-level decision making, using artificial neural networks optimized with evolutionary computation. I evaluated this model as a virtual mobile robot controller.

The report is available here: http://francky.me/publications.php

Theoretical tools: Evolutionary algorithms, artificial neural networks, robotics and computational neuroscience. Technologies: C++ (Boost, SDL), Python (Pygame), MATLAB

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Position Jan 2010 → Jul 2010 (7 months)
Software Developer at La Banque Postale

Location: La Banque Postale's J2EE expert department (DISFE/DCP/CDM - Centre de Développement Mutualisé).

Job: Specification, conception and development of an internal project management application which will be used by La Banque Postale's J2EE expert department.

Technologies: Java (Spring), PL/SQL, UML, HTML, JavaScript (MooTools, jQuery), CSS, XML, IBM Rational Software Architect, IBM WebSphere, Oracle DB, PowerAMC, Oracle SQL Developer

Location: La Banque Postale's J2EE expert department (DISFE/DCP/CDM - Centre de Développement Mutualisé).

Job: Specification, conception and development of an internal project management application which will be used by La Banque Postale's J2EE expert department.

Technologies: Java (Spring), PL/SQL, UML, HTML, JavaScript (MooTools, jQuery), CSS, XML, IBM Rational Software Architect, IBM WebSphere, Oracle DB, PowerAMC, Oracle SQL Developer

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Position Jun 2009 → Dec 2009 (7 months)
CTO's assistant at COGIS Sarl

Job: Information System Development. Process analysis, change management, databases design and software migration.

Technologies: UML, MySQL, PHP, C++ (Qt), HTML, JavaScript, CSS

Job: Information System Development. Process analysis, change management, databases design and software migration.

Technologies: UML, MySQL, PHP, C++ (Qt), HTML, JavaScript, CSS

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Education 2008 → 2009
Graduate Visitor, University of Bath

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Position Apr 2008 → Jun 2009 (1 year, 3 months)
President at HEC Microsystèmes

Our society gives classes in IT that are recognized and paid by HEC Paris to over 500 students every year, buys and resells around 100 PC/year, runs the main campus websites such as campushec.com, helps students to fix their laptops, organizes LAN parties and our office is open 4 hours/day.

Technologies: Misc (hardware, security, programming, OS, ...)

Our society gives classes in IT that are recognized and paid by HEC Paris to over 500 students every year, buys and resells around 100 PC/year, runs the main campus websites such as campushec.com, helps students to fix their laptops, organizes LAN parties and our office is open 4 hours/day.

Technologies: Misc (hardware, security, programming, OS, ...)

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Education 2008 → 2008
Graduate Visitor, Stanford University

Programming Abstractions, Data Structure, Algorithms. Average grade: A.

Programming Abstractions, Data Structure, Algorithms. Average grade: A.

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Education 2007 → 2008
Bachelor, Université Paris Dauphine

Mathematics applied to finance & economics

Mathematics applied to finance & economics

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Education 2007 → 2007
Summer Visitor, Peking University

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Education 2002 → 2007
Baccalaureate & Prepa, Lycée Henri IV

I took part in the Mathematical Kangaroo, a popular competition, and reached the 1st position in Lycée Henri IV (2005).

I took part in the Mathematical Kangaroo, a popular competition, and reached the 1st position in Lycée Henri IV (2005).

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Position Jan 2005 → Dec 2006 (2 years)
Co-Founder & CEO at FMclubbing.com

I co-founded this website about Paris’ nightlife and promoted it with some friends. During the first year, the website had over 300,000 hits, more than 500 parties were published and 43 nightclubs contacted us to advertise their parties on the website.

Technologies: HTML, PHP, JavaScript, CSS, MySQL, SQL

I co-founded this website about Paris’ nightlife and promoted it with some friends. During the first year, the website had over 300,000 hits, more than 500 parties were published and 43 nightclubs contacted us to advertise their parties on the website.

Technologies: HTML, PHP, JavaScript, CSS, MySQL, SQL

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