Tom Wright

Supporting growth through technology
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Favorite editor: Notepad++ or Visual Studio 2017 • First computer: PC (Windows 3.1)
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Position Aug 2018 → Current (3 months)
Software Developer at HeadUp Labs

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Open source Oct 2017 → Current (1 year, 1 month)
Last commit on Aug 24, 18
92 Commits / 4,829 ++ / 2,075 --

Simple yet flexible tables for console apps.

Simple yet flexible tables for console apps.

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Education Jan 2017 → Current

Completed courses:

  • C# Tips and Traps 2
  • C# Tips and Traps
  • More Effective LINQ
  • Microsoft Azure Service Bus Brokered * Messaging In-depth
  • F# Jumpstart
  • OWASP Top 10 Web Application Security Risks for ASP.NET

Completed courses:

  • C# Tips and Traps 2
  • C# Tips and Traps
  • More Effective LINQ
  • Microsoft Azure Service Bus Brokered * Messaging In-depth
  • F# Jumpstart
  • OWASP Top 10 Web Application Security Risks for ASP.NET

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Position Dec 2016 → Jun 2018 (1 year, 7 months)
Solutions Developer at IT Governance Ltd

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Blogs or videos Nov 2017

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Assessment Feb 2017
Title: C# - Score: 220/300

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Position Jul 2015 → Nov 2016 (1 year, 5 months)
Data Services Manager at Alzheimer's Research UK

I enjoy using my broad base of technical skills to ensure a high return on investment is realised through our fundraising activities. During my time in this position I have successfully made the case for investment, growing the team to include two Data Processing executives and a Business Intelligence officer.

Together, we deliver intelligence and analysis using the MS SQL stack (inc. SSRS), extend our in-house tooling using visual basic, and develop new applications primarily in C#.

I enjoy using my broad base of technical skills to ensure a high return on investment is realised through our fundraising activities. During my time in this position I have successfully made the case for investment, growing the team to include two Data Processing executives and a Business Intelligence officer.

Together, we deliver intelligence and analysis using the MS SQL stack (inc. SSRS), extend our in-house tooling using visual basic, and develop new applications primarily in C#.

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Position Oct 2013 → Jul 2015 (1 year, 10 months)
Fundraising Database Officer at Alzheimer's Research UK

Administering the MS SQL based CRM database, ensuring the data was of high quality, and instilling best practice in its use. I was also responsible for delivering analysis and for enabling colleagues to do the same.

Administering the MS SQL based CRM database, ensuring the data was of high quality, and instilling best practice in its use. I was also responsible for delivering analysis and for enabling colleagues to do the same.

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Blogs or videos Mar 2015

Sensory substitution devices convert information normally associated with one sense into another sense (e.g. converting vision into sound). This is often done to compensate for an impaired sense. The present research uses a multimodal approach in which both natural vision and sound-from-vision (‘soundscapes’) are simultaneously presented. Although there is a systematic correspondence between what is seen and what is heard, we introduce a local discrepancy between the signals (the presence of a target object that is heard but not seen) that the participant is required to locate. In addition to behavioural responses, the participants’ gaze is monitored with eye-tracking. Although the target object is only presented in the auditory channel, behavioural performance is enhanced when visual information relating to the non-target background is presented. In this instance, vision may be used to generate predictions about the soundscape that enhances the ability to detect the hidden auditory object. The eye-tracking data reveal that participants look for longer in the quadrant containing the auditory target even when they subsequently judge it to be located elsewhere. As such, eye movements generated by soundscapes reveal the knowledge of the target location that does not necessarily correspond to the actual judgment made. The results provide a proof of principle that multimodal sensory substitution may be of benefit to visually impaired people with some residual vision and, in normally sighted participants, for guiding search within complex scenes.

Sensory substitution devices convert information normally associated with one sense into another sense (e.g. converting vision into sound). This is often done to compensate for an impaired sense. The present research uses a multimodal approach in which both natural vision and sound-from-vision (‘soundscapes’) are simultaneously presented. Although there is a systematic correspondence between what is seen and what is heard, we introduce a local discrepancy between the signals (the presence of a target object that is heard but not seen) that the participant is required to locate. In addition to behavioural responses, the participants’ gaze is monitored with eye-tracking. Although the target object is only presented in the auditory channel, behavioural performance is enhanced when visual information relating to the non-target background is presented. In this instance, vision may be used to generate predictions about the soundscape that enhances the ability to detect the hidden auditory object. The eye-tracking data reveal that participants look for longer in the quadrant containing the auditory target even when they subsequently judge it to be located elsewhere. As such, eye movements generated by soundscapes reveal the knowledge of the target location that does not necessarily correspond to the actual judgment made. The results provide a proof of principle that multimodal sensory substitution may be of benefit to visually impaired people with some residual vision and, in normally sighted participants, for guiding search within complex scenes.

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Blogs or videos Apr 2014

In this review we explore the relationship between synaesthesia and sensory substitution and argue that sensory substitution does indeed show properties of synaesthesia. Both are associated with atypical perceptual experiences elicited by the processing of a qualitatively different stimulus to that which normally gives rise to that experience. In the most common forms of sensory substitution, perceptual processing of an auditory or tactile signal (which has been converted from a visual signal) is experienced as visual-like in addition to retaining auditory/tactile characteristics. We consider different lines of evidence that support, to varying degrees, the assumption that sensory substitution is associated with visual-like experiences. We then go on to analyse the key similarities and differences between sensory substitution and synaesthesia. Lastly, we propose two testable predictions: firstly that, in an expert user of a sensory substitution device, the substituting modality should not be lost. Secondly that stimulation within the substituting modality, but by means other than a sensory substitution device, should still produce sensation in the normally substituted modality.

In this review we explore the relationship between synaesthesia and sensory substitution and argue that sensory substitution does indeed show properties of synaesthesia. Both are associated with atypical perceptual experiences elicited by the processing of a qualitatively different stimulus to that which normally gives rise to that experience. In the most common forms of sensory substitution, perceptual processing of an auditory or tactile signal (which has been converted from a visual signal) is experienced as visual-like in addition to retaining auditory/tactile characteristics. We consider different lines of evidence that support, to varying degrees, the assumption that sensory substitution is associated with visual-like experiences. We then go on to analyse the key similarities and differences between sensory substitution and synaesthesia. Lastly, we propose two testable predictions: firstly that, in an expert user of a sensory substitution device, the substituting modality should not be lost. Secondly that stimulation within the substituting modality, but by means other than a sensory substitution device, should still produce sensation in the normally substituted modality.

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Education 2009 → 2013
PhD in Sensory Stubstitution, University of Sussex

As well as completing my PhD, I am fortunate enough to have had a couple of papers published in scientific journals. For example:

I have also enjoyed the opportunity to teach both undergraduates and my postgraduate peers. I have:

  • Taught on a 1st year course called "Psychobiology", where we discussed topics such as models of learning, addiction and evolutionary psychology.
  • Developed and delivered a series of training events for other tutors whilst I held the role of "associate tutor rep".
  • Convened, designed and delivered a course called "Matlab for experimental psychologists", which will likely run again in 2013/14.

As well as completing my PhD, I am fortunate enough to have had a couple of papers published in scientific journals. For example:

I have also enjoyed the opportunity to teach both undergraduates and my postgraduate peers. I have:

  • Taught on a 1st year course called "Psychobiology", where we discussed topics such as models of learning, addiction and evolutionary psychology.
  • Developed and delivered a series of training events for other tutors whilst I held the role of "associate tutor rep".
  • Convened, designed and delivered a course called "Matlab for experimental psychologists", which will likely run again in 2013/14.

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Position Jan 2010 → Oct 2013 (3 years, 10 months)
Technical Director at Radio Free Brighton

Radio Free Brighton is a community radio station based in Brighton on the south coast of England. As technical director (a voluntary role) I oversaw operations in the studio and online. This included administering the servers, building and maintaining the website, and developing applications that helped the station to run.

Radio Free Brighton is a community radio station based in Brighton on the south coast of England. As technical director (a voluntary role) I oversaw operations in the studio and online. This included administering the servers, building and maintaining the website, and developing applications that helped the station to run.

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Open source Oct 2012 → Aug 2013 (11 months)

Ployglot Framework for Sensory Substitution Devices

Sole developer - this project formed the foundation of my PhD thesis.

Ployglot Framework for Sensory Substitution Devices

Sole developer - this project formed the foundation of my PhD thesis.

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Blogs or videos Dec 2012

Sensory substitution is a promising technique for mitigating the loss of a sensory modality. Sensory substitution devices (SSDs) work by converting information from the impaired sense (e.g., vision) into another, intact sense (e.g., audition). However, there are a potentially infinite number of ways of converting images into sounds, and it is important that the conversion takes into account the limits of human perception and other user-related factors (e.g., whether the sounds are pleasant to listen to). The device explored here is termed “polyglot” because it generates a very large set of solutions. Specifically, we adapt a procedure that has been in widespread use in the design of technology but has rarely been used as a tool to explore perception—namely, interactive genetic algorithms. In this procedure, a very large range of potential sensory substitution devices can be explored by creating a set of “genes” with different allelic variants (e.g., different ways of translating luminance into loudness). The most successful devices are then “bred” together, and we statistically explore the characteristics of the selected-for traits after multiple generations. The aim of the present study is to produce design guidelines for a better SSD. In three experiments, we vary the way that the fitness of the device is computed: by asking the user to rate the auditory aesthetics of different devices (Experiment 1), and by measuring the ability of participants to match sounds to images (Experiment 2) and the ability to perceptually discriminate between two sounds derived from similar images (Experiment 3). In each case, the traits selected for by the genetic algorithm represent the ideal SSD for that task. Taken together, these traits can guide the design of a better SSD.

Sensory substitution is a promising technique for mitigating the loss of a sensory modality. Sensory substitution devices (SSDs) work by converting information from the impaired sense (e.g., vision) into another, intact sense (e.g., audition). However, there are a potentially infinite number of ways of converting images into sounds, and it is important that the conversion takes into account the limits of human perception and other user-related factors (e.g., whether the sounds are pleasant to listen to). The device explored here is termed “polyglot” because it generates a very large set of solutions. Specifically, we adapt a procedure that has been in widespread use in the design of technology but has rarely been used as a tool to explore perception—namely, interactive genetic algorithms. In this procedure, a very large range of potential sensory substitution devices can be explored by creating a set of “genes” with different allelic variants (e.g., different ways of translating luminance into loudness). The most successful devices are then “bred” together, and we statistically explore the characteristics of the selected-for traits after multiple generations. The aim of the present study is to produce design guidelines for a better SSD. In three experiments, we vary the way that the fitness of the device is computed: by asking the user to rate the auditory aesthetics of different devices (Experiment 1), and by measuring the ability of participants to match sounds to images (Experiment 2) and the ability to perceptually discriminate between two sounds derived from similar images (Experiment 3). In each case, the traits selected for by the genetic algorithm represent the ideal SSD for that task. Taken together, these traits can guide the design of a better SSD.

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Open source Oct 2012 → Oct 2012 (1 month)

Android app which makes devices into haptic touchpads

Android app which makes devices into haptic touchpads

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Open source Aug 2012 → Oct 2012 (3 months)

NAudio (C#) class for generating localised tones

NAudio (C#) class for generating localised tones

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Open source Mar 2012 → Mar 2012 (1 month)

Round Robin Queue for .NET

Round Robin Queue for .NET

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Open source Feb 2012 → Feb 2012 (1 month)

Provides the necessary elements to create an HSV colour picker in C#

Provides the necessary elements to create an HSV colour picker in C#

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Position Aug 2009 → Dec 2009 (5 months)
Social media coordinator at 10:10

I originally volunteered to take on the promotion of the launch event, which took place at the beginning of September, but ended up staying on to develop a long term social media strategy.

I originally volunteered to take on the promotion of the launch event, which took place at the beginning of September, but ended up staying on to develop a long term social media strategy.

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Position 2007 → 2009 (3 years)
Technical Partner at Binary Star Digital

Binary Star Digital was the formalisation of the part-time web development that funded my time at university. I partnered with a creative colleague and together we worked for a wide range of clients to deliver websites and facebook applications. Notable clients included IDEO (international design firm) and the International Planned Parenthood Federation.

Binary Star Digital was the formalisation of the part-time web development that funded my time at university. I partnered with a creative colleague and together we worked for a wide range of clients to deliver websites and facebook applications. Notable clients included IDEO (international design firm) and the International Planned Parenthood Federation.

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Education 2006 → 2009
BSc Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Sussex

I graduated from Sussex in 2009 with a 1st Class Honours degree in Cognitive Neuroscience.

This course was perfect for me, as it combined the biology of the brain with psychology and computer science.

During my time at Sussex I was also heavily involved with the digital aspects of student media. In 2008 I was awarded the "Innovation of the year" award for an event calendar project. In 2009 I was honoured to receive an award recognising my "Overall contribution to student media".

I graduated from Sussex in 2009 with a 1st Class Honours degree in Cognitive Neuroscience.

This course was perfect for me, as it combined the biology of the brain with psychology and computer science.

During my time at Sussex I was also heavily involved with the digital aspects of student media. In 2008 I was awarded the "Innovation of the year" award for an event calendar project. In 2009 I was honoured to receive an award recognising my "Overall contribution to student media".

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39
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