Dan Hulme

Senior Engineer at Cambridge Consultants Ltd.
Cambridge, United Kingdom
nasaldemons orac
Last active on Stack Overflow yesterday

With a background in designing and optimizing algorithms, I've brought that skill to bear in many different fields: GPU drivers, defence projects, real-time ray-tracing, virtual reality, and self-driving cars.

As well as my programming work, I've introduced new techniques and ways of working at each organisation I've been a part of; not for the sake of it, but because I want the organisation to work efficiently and scale well. I've also brought companies into new technology areas and markets, and most recently started building a team from scratch.

As you can see from my activity on the Android SE site, I am strong at communicating technical ideas and details to a mixed audience. I have given programming seminars to fellow programmers, demonstrated computer vision techniques to schoolchildren while volunteering at a local science centre, and I blog as part of my current work.

Right now I'm looking for a position that will make use of those skills representing the company to others such as partners and customers, to develop new business; as well as applying my experience of "servant leadership" to building a team that can deliver.

With a background in designing and optimizing algorithms, I've brought that skill to bear in many different fields: GPU drivers, defence projects, real-time ray-tracing, virtual reality, and self-driving cars.

As well as my programming work, I've introduced new techniques and ways of working at each organisation I've been a part of; not for the sake of it, but because I want the organisation to work efficiently and scale well. I've also brought companies into new technology areas and markets, and most recently started building a team from scratch.

As you can see from my activity on the Android SE site, I am strong at communicating technical ideas and details to a mixed audience. I have given programming seminars to fellow programmers, demonstrated computer vision techniques to schoolchildren while volunteering at a local science centre, and I blog as part of my current work.

Right now I'm looking for a position that will make use of those skills representing the company to others such as partners and customers, to develop new business; as well as applying my experience of "servant leadership" to building a team that can deliver.

Favorite editor: Vim • First computer: Commodore 64
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Certification Dec 2018 → Current (7 months)

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Position Apr 2017 → Apr 2018 (1 year, 1 month)
Software Engineer at FiveAI Ltd
  • Started with the remit to make improvements to a 3D simulation in Unity which the company had bought source-code for, but it quickly became apparent that it would not meet our needs.
  • Convinced the founders to invest in a new development team to build a simulator in Unreal Engine.
  • Created job specs and contributed to defining the interview process for that team.
  • Participated in hiring an experienced VP to take over that work, and got the early hires up to speed.
  • Moved to the Programme Management Group, defining our integration and release process and tooling.
  • Started with the remit to make improvements to a 3D simulation in Unity which the company had bought source-code for, but it quickly became apparent that it would not meet our needs.
  • Convinced the founders to invest in a new development team to build a simulator in Unreal Engine.
  • Created job specs and contributed to defining the interview process for that team.
  • Participated in hiring an experienced VP to take over that work, and got the early hires up to speed.
  • Moved to the Programme Management Group, defining our integration and release process and tooling.

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Blogs or videos Nov 2017

I gave this talk to local charity Camcycle to help show how FiveAI's aims as an autonomous vehicle developer support Camcycle's aims of safer cycling and less congestion. As well as getting our point across to an important local group, it also allowed me to assess their reactions and concerns, in anticipation of interacting with London Cycling Campaign ahead of FiveAI's deployment in London.

I gave this talk to local charity Camcycle to help show how FiveAI's aims as an autonomous vehicle developer support Camcycle's aims of safer cycling and less congestion. As well as getting our point across to an important local group, it also allowed me to assess their reactions and concerns, in anticipation of interacting with London Cycling Campaign ahead of FiveAI's deployment in London.

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Position Dec 2014 → Apr 2017 (2 years, 5 months)
Senior Engineer at Cambridge Consultants Ltd.

As a consultancy, the projects I worked on were very varied, including porting an RTOS to a custom high-reliability board, making demo mobile apps, and interfacing to medical devices via Bluetooth Low Energy.

In one case I took over a failing project which had spent £90k on Android without delivering a single working feature. By finding which requirements represented genuine customer needs, and using test-driven development on a fresh codebase, I shipped the production app in less than two months for less than a third of the cost. Then I took over the (Objective C + Swift) iPhone app after its lead developer left, and brought that to production quality.

Later, I convinced the divisional management to invest in virtual reality, pitched our first VR proof-of-concept to a client, and led the software team delivering that project in Unity, all the way to monitoring the software running on the customer's stand at their industry's biggest trade show. This led to further projects for the same client, and credibility in that field, which brought us new clients.

As a consultancy, the projects I worked on were very varied, including porting an RTOS to a custom high-reliability board, making demo mobile apps, and interfacing to medical devices via Bluetooth Low Energy.

In one case I took over a failing project which had spent £90k on Android without delivering a single working feature. By finding which requirements represented genuine customer needs, and using test-driven development on a fresh codebase, I shipped the production app in less than two months for less than a third of the cost. Then I took over the (Objective C + Swift) iPhone app after its lead developer left, and brought that to production quality.

Later, I convinced the divisional management to invest in virtual reality, pitched our first VR proof-of-concept to a client, and led the software team delivering that project in Unity, all the way to monitoring the software running on the customer's stand at their industry's biggest trade show. This led to further projects for the same client, and credibility in that field, which brought us new clients.

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Blogs or videos Jul 2016

Another piece for the Cambridge Consultants corporate blog, about the market for mobile GPUs in non-smartphone applications such as high-end printers.

Another piece for the Cambridge Consultants corporate blog, about the market for mobile GPUs in non-smartphone applications such as high-end printers.

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31
Top post Jun 2015

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Blogs or videos Jun 2015

Published on the Cambridge Consultants consumer technology blog, it's about a technique I use to avoid the X-Y problem when trying to understand users' needs.

Published on the Cambridge Consultants consumer technology blog, it's about a technique I use to avoid the X-Y problem when trying to understand users' needs.

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Position Aug 2012 → Dec 2014 (2 years, 5 months)
Owner at Shadowburst

As the owner of a small business, I was responsible for the whole business: programming, support, product management, marketing, and sales. I used agile processes to prototype and plan new products, and then stay focused on delivery. People always say the biggest challenge of self-employment is staying motivated and keeping one's nose to the grindstone, but I didn't have a problem with that. For me, what was hardest was not having colleagues to bounce ideas off and sanity-check my designs. There are good support networks in Cambridge for small business owners, but it's not the same.

As the owner of a small business, I was responsible for the whole business: programming, support, product management, marketing, and sales. I used agile processes to prototype and plan new products, and then stay focused on delivery. People always say the biggest challenge of self-employment is staying motivated and keeping one's nose to the grindstone, but I didn't have a problem with that. For me, what was hardest was not having colleagues to bounce ideas off and sanity-check my designs. There are good support networks in Cambridge for small business owners, but it's not the same.

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Feature or Apps 2014

bURLy is an Android project to replace the default chooser for HTTP and HTTPS links with something better.

I wrote it initially as a test project to see if Scala is suitable for production use on Android, and then developed it further into a commercial product.

bURLy is an Android project to replace the default chooser for HTTP and HTTPS links with something better.

I wrote it initially as a test project to see if Scala is suitable for production use on Android, and then developed it further into a commercial product.

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Blogs or videos Oct 2014

When I started flying (see facing), I started this blog so I'd have a record of my progress in learning, and to help share the excitement with others: both those who are used to flying more modern aircraft types, and those who are interested in flying but aren't pilots themselves.

When I started flying (see facing), I started this blog so I'd have a record of my progress in learning, and to help share the excitement with others: both those who are used to flying more modern aircraft types, and those who are interested in flying but aren't pilots themselves.

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Hobbies Oct 2014
Flying
Flying

When I'm not at work, you can often see me flying over Cambridge in a Tiger Moth: a 1930's biplane which trained most fighter pilots in the Second World War.

When I'm not at work, you can often see me flying over Cambridge in a Tiger Moth: a 1930's biplane which trained most fighter pilots in the Second World War.

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Blogs or videos Aug 2014

If you’ve ever looked after a baby, you know how annoying it is when different problems result in the same error message. You feed it, change its nappy, wind it, try all kinds of guesses, but still,…

If you’ve ever looked after a baby, you know how annoying it is when different problems result in the same error message. You feed it, change its nappy, wind it, try all kinds of guesses, but still,…

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33
Top post Sep 2013

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Feature or Apps Oct 2012

Google's Nexus 10 tablet was the first product to use the Mali-T600 series of GPUs, whose driver I helped to develop at ARM. I worked on various parts of the driver and also led a cross-group team to integrate new features at the OS vendor's site.

Google's Nexus 10 tablet was the first product to use the Mali-T600 series of GPUs, whose driver I helped to develop at ARM. I worked on various parts of the driver and also led a cross-group team to integrate new features at the OS vendor's site.

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Feature or Apps Sep 2012

Break the ice at a party, enjoy an evening with friends, or liven up a family night with The Hat Game: the frantic team game of guessing names that's fun for groups all ages.

This is Shadowburst's first game, so everything there is my fault.

Break the ice at a party, enjoy an evening with friends, or liven up a family night with The Hat Game: the frantic team game of guessing names that's fun for groups all ages.

This is Shadowburst's first game, so everything there is my fault.

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Position Jan 2010 → Aug 2012 (2 years, 8 months)
Senior Software Engineer at ARM

In the Media Processing Division, I contributed to drivers for the Mali series of GPUs. I specified, wrote, and tested texture conversion, and worked on Android OS integration, and I reviewed and contributed to hardware specifications. I led a "virtual team" of domain experts across multiple teams to define and implement new standards for cross-process synchronization primitives, which ultimately rescued a shaky customer relationship.

In the Media Processing Division, I contributed to drivers for the Mali series of GPUs. I specified, wrote, and tested texture conversion, and worked on Android OS integration, and I reviewed and contributed to hardware specifications. I led a "virtual team" of domain experts across multiple teams to define and implement new standards for cross-process synchronization primitives, which ultimately rescued a shaky customer relationship.

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4
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Open source Feb 2012 → Feb 2012 (1 month)

Noughts-and-crosses implementation in Haskell.

I wrote this as a learning project to teach myself Haskell, and expanded it with some simple QuickCheck tests to try out the continuous integration tool Travis.

Noughts-and-crosses implementation in Haskell.

I wrote this as a learning project to teach myself Haskell, and expanded it with some simple QuickCheck tests to try out the continuous integration tool Travis.

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Open source Feb 2009 → Nov 2011 (2 years, 10 months)

A vector monospaced font for programmers

I made this font using FontForge because of the lack of vector monospaced fonts that are readable at small sizes and allow you to distinguish between 1, I, and l; and between 0 and O. I don't use it myself any more: I've switched to Input, which has the same features I need but also offers proportional fonts in the same family.

A vector monospaced font for programmers

I made this font using FontForge because of the lack of vector monospaced fonts that are readable at small sizes and allow you to distinguish between 1, I, and l; and between 0 and O. I don't use it myself any more: I've switched to Input, which has the same features I need but also offers proportional fonts in the same family.

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Position Feb 2008 → Dec 2009 (1 year, 11 months)
Software Development Engineer at ArtVPS

I worked in a team to create an interactive, GPU-accelerated, production ray-tracer. This included integrating with Autodesk 3ds Max, designing and optimizing shaders, creating a data serialization library, and a lot of investigation of new algorithms. I also reduced development costs by championing new technologies and ways of working, including UML statecharts, the Boost C++ libraries, and Scrum.

I gave seminars and trained less experienced developers, reviewed code and proof-read documentation (for both technical accuracy and writing style).

I worked in a team to create an interactive, GPU-accelerated, production ray-tracer. This included integrating with Autodesk 3ds Max, designing and optimizing shaders, creating a data serialization library, and a lot of investigation of new algorithms. I also reduced development costs by championing new technologies and ways of working, including UML statecharts, the Boost C++ libraries, and Scrum.

I gave seminars and trained less experienced developers, reviewed code and proof-read documentation (for both technical accuracy and writing style).

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Position Nov 2006 → Jan 2008 (1 year, 3 months)
Software Developer at Ubisense

As the first non-founder software developer, I helped to grow Ubisense's real-time location system, based on UWB radio and a distributed relational database. I worked throughout the system, from the Direct3D visualization GUI component down to the network stack in the sensor firmware. I also worked independently on two projects. One was a bespoke warehouse management solution, where I had to discover the customer's real needs despite salespeople trying to push a particular technology. The other was a GUI-based rules engine for untrained users, which I designed and implemented.

I found out recently that the visualization system I overhauled when I was there is still in use today, both in live software, and to generate illustrations for their marketing videos. It's nice to see that I made a positive and long-lasting change.

As the first non-founder software developer, I helped to grow Ubisense's real-time location system, based on UWB radio and a distributed relational database. I worked throughout the system, from the Direct3D visualization GUI component down to the network stack in the sensor firmware. I also worked independently on two projects. One was a bespoke warehouse management solution, where I had to discover the customer's real needs despite salespeople trying to push a particular technology. The other was a GUI-based rules engine for untrained users, which I designed and implemented.

I found out recently that the visualization system I overhauled when I was there is still in use today, both in live software, and to generate illustrations for their marketing videos. It's nice to see that I made a positive and long-lasting change.

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Position Oct 2005 → Sep 2006 (1 year)
Software Engineer at Autonomy

I had two roles at Autonomy. Initially I worked in a reactive team, integrating our product with third-party document management and authentication systems, such as LiveLink, MS Sharepoint, and MS Active Directory, according to customer requirements. To be effective, I had to learn new systems quickly, and understand their core concepts and terminology enough to discuss requirements with customers, and then absorb the API and any existing code quickly enough to integrate with it, however bad the documentation was.

Then, I was put in charge of a small team re-writing the user data and authentication server. This required being compatible with undocumented features of the previous version, and a lot of focus on security, concurrency, and distributed system issues. It involved a lot of communication with other parts of the business and teams in charge of related products, as well as having to pin down vague deadlines and requirements, and prioritising features.

I had two roles at Autonomy. Initially I worked in a reactive team, integrating our product with third-party document management and authentication systems, such as LiveLink, MS Sharepoint, and MS Active Directory, according to customer requirements. To be effective, I had to learn new systems quickly, and understand their core concepts and terminology enough to discuss requirements with customers, and then absorb the API and any existing code quickly enough to integrate with it, however bad the documentation was.

Then, I was put in charge of a small team re-writing the user data and authentication server. This required being compatible with undocumented features of the previous version, and a lot of focus on security, concurrency, and distributed system issues. It involved a lot of communication with other parts of the business and teams in charge of related products, as well as having to pin down vague deadlines and requirements, and prioritising features.

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Education 2002 → 2005
MA, Computer Science, University of Cambridge

My first year included modules on maths, physics, and materials science, which have really helped me out when I'm simulating optical systems or writing shaders.

My second year included a group project writing an instant messaging system in Java, which let users send and receive messages through a desktop client, via SMS, and by email.

My final year project was to devise and implement in C++ a novel algorithm for ray-tracing fur, based on Perlin hypertextures.

My first year included modules on maths, physics, and materials science, which have really helped me out when I'm simulating optical systems or writing shaders.

My second year included a group project writing an instant messaging system in Java, which let users send and receive messages through a desktop client, via SMS, and by email.

My final year project was to devise and implement in C++ a novel algorithm for ray-tracing fur, based on Perlin hypertextures.

Recommended reading

by Andrei Alexandrescu

I reviewed the manuscript of this book for the publishers before its release.

I reviewed the manuscript of this book for the publishers before its release.

by Nathaniel S. Borenstein

Although the examples are very dated, this book continues to inform my attitude to improving user experience and to planning how to reach the minimum viable product. One of the chapter titles is, "Listen to your users, but ignore what they say," a reference to the X-Y problem (before that name had been invented).

Although the examples are very dated, this book continues to inform my attitude to improving user experience and to planning how to reach the minimum viable product. One of the chapter titles is, "Listen to your users, but ignore what they say," a reference to the X-Y problem (before that name had been invented).

by Henry S. Warren Jr.

This is the kind of book I only refer to once every few years, but when I do, it's invaluable. When I first read it, it opened my eyes to the possibilities of using different representations for numbers to make some kinds of computation easier: the most common example being representing powers-of-two by their log_2. Since then, it's helped me to pack the most data into large data structures efficiently, and to optimize texture conversion routines to get the most power out of each instruction without sacrificing numerical precision.

This is the kind of book I only refer to once every few years, but when I do, it's invaluable. When I first read it, it opened my eyes to the possibilities of using different representations for numbers to make some kinds of computation easier: the most common example being representing powers-of-two by their log_2. Since then, it's helped me to pack the most data into large data structures efficiently, and to optimize texture conversion routines to get the most power out of each instruction without sacrificing numerical precision.

Agile Estimating and Planning
by Mike Cohn

I read this over a weekend as part of a Scrum adoption, and it helped make the adoption work. It's not specific to Scrum: it's for any Agile process with iterations and story points. It has advice for designing backlog items (whether they're user stories or something else) to avoid dependencies and enable useful estimates. It helps product owners to turn the sizes and velocity they get from their team into a forecast usable in a non-Agile wider organisation (i.e. commit to a ship date, prioritise work according to uncertainty as well as value, calculate ROI for a business plan or proposal), and day-to-day tips about managing your backlog, creating burndown charts, and getting the right information out of sprint planning.

I read this over a weekend as part of a Scrum adoption, and it helped make the adoption work. It's not specific to Scrum: it's for any Agile process with iterations and story points. It has advice for designing backlog items (whether they're user stories or something else) to avoid dependencies and enable useful estimates. It helps product owners to turn the sizes and velocity they get from their team into a forecast usable in a non-Agile wider organisation (i.e. commit to a ship date, prioritise work according to uncertainty as well as value, calculate ROI for a business plan or proposal), and day-to-day tips about managing your backlog, creating burndown charts, and getting the right information out of sprint planning.