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CSS isn't, insofar as I know, Turing complete. But my knowledge of CSS is very limited.

  • Is CSS Turing complete?
  • Are any of the existing draft or committees considering language features that might enable Turing completeness if it isn't right now?
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16  
It's already been done, if you use ie6. They're called CSS expressions, and consensus is they are horribly broken and dangerous. JS embedded in CSS... –  kibibu Mar 23 '10 at 2:23
6  
@Kibibu - Yikes! Please erase that idea from my brain before it folds on itself! –  DVK Mar 23 '10 at 2:25
    
How could CSS possibly be Turing-complete? –  SLaks Mar 23 '10 at 2:29
    
@DVK: you could actually do some cool things with them - particularly with regards to resolution independent layout - that are still tricky or quirky in CSS without resorting to tables. I think if they'd limited it to be strictly a declarative expression language with no side-effects instead of allowing full access to the script engine it would have been better received (and maybe also if webkit had come up with it first) –  kibibu Mar 23 '10 at 3:20
2  
@SLaks: Don't underestimate the power of HTML5/CSS3 :) –  Niklas B. Feb 28 '12 at 17:10

5 Answers 5

up vote 195 down vote accepted

You can encode Rule 110 in CSS3, so it's Turing-complete so long as you consider an appropriate accompanying HTML file and user interactions to be part of the “execution” of CSS. A pretty good implementation is available, and another implementation is included here (JsFiddle version):

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
    <head>
        <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
        <title>Rule 110</title>
        <style type="text/css" media="screen">
            body {
                -webkit-animation: bugfix infinite 1s;
                font-family: "Courier New";
                font-size: 28px;
            }
            @-webkit-keyframes bugfix { from { padding: 0; } to { padding: 0; } }

            /* 111 110 101 100 011 010 001 000
0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 */

            body > input {
                -webkit-appearance: none;
                display: block;
                float: left;
                border-right: 1px solid #ddd;
                border-bottom: 1px solid #ddd;
                padding: 5px 12px;
                margin: 0;
            }
            body > input::before {
                content: "0";
            }

            body > input:nth-of-type(-n+30) { border-top: 1px solid #ddd; }
            body > input:nth-of-type(30n+1) { border-left: 1px solid #ddd; clear: left; }

            body > input::before { content: "0"; }

            body > input:checked::before { content: "1"; }
            body > input:checked { background: #afa !important; }


            input:not(:checked) +
                    *+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+
                    input::before {
                content: "1";
            }
            input:not(:checked) +
                    *+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+
                    input {
                background: #fa0;
            }


            input:checked +
                    *+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+
                    input::before {
                content: "1";
            }
            input:checked +
                    *+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+
                    input {
                background: #fa0;
            }


            input:checked +
                    *+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+
                    input::before {
                content: "1";
            }
            input:checked +
                    *+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+
                    input {
                background: #fa0;
            }

            input:checked + input:checked + input:checked +
                    *+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+
                    input::before {
                content: "0";
            }
            input:checked + input:checked + input:checked +
                    *+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+
                    input {
                background: #fff;
            }

            input:not(:checked) + input:not(:checked) + input:not(:checked) +
                    *+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+
                    input::before {
                content: "0";
            }
            input:not(:checked) + input:not(:checked) + input:not(:checked) +
                    *+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+*+
                    input {
                background: #fff;
            }

            body > input:nth-child(30n) { display: none !important; }
            body > input:nth-child(30n) + label { display: none !important; }

        </style>
    </head>

    <body>
        <input type="checkbox" />
        <input type="checkbox" />

        /* A total of 900 checkboxes required */

        <input type="checkbox" />
        <input type="checkbox" />

    </body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
30  
O_O ... now I can't complain that I didn't learn something interesting today. –  iDontKnowBetter May 16 '12 at 21:07
86  
BRILLIANT!. However, I don't think this qualifies as turing complete. CSS is only able to calculate 1 iteration of the state-machine. Your example relies on the human repeatedly clicking all the orange boxes in order to feed the "output" (pixels) back into the input (page state) and "pump" the state machine. Because there is no programmatic way to use the output of CSS as input, it can't be used to calculate any multi-step loops, the hallmark of turing-complete languages. –  Dave Dopson Nov 28 '12 at 23:41
12  
For all these that are too lazy to click (more than once) JsFiddle. –  derenio Feb 27 '13 at 17:32
12  
-1: As much as I think this is cool, as mentioned in an above comment, CSS alone cannot pump the state machine by itself. The mere fact that this is selected as answer to this thread is misleading indeed. –  Thomas Eding Jun 7 '13 at 0:03
21  
yet, you can't center a div –  nvartolomei May 2 at 10:40

As per this article, it's not. The article also argues that it's not a good idea to make it one.

To quote from one of the comments:

So, I do not believe that CSS is turing complete. There is no capability to define a function in CSS. In order for a system to be turing-complete it has to be possible to write an interpreter: a function that interprets expressions that denote programs to execute. CSS has no variables that are directly accessible to the user; so you cannot even model the structure that represents the program to be interpreted in CSS.

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3  
CSS isn't executable in any way. The person who wrote the quoted comment doesn't seem to understand that. :-\ –  Ryan Prior Mar 23 '10 at 3:01
18  
CSS is a set of instructions to a processor (layout engine). What's so not "executable" about it? –  DVK Mar 23 '10 at 3:26
13  
Turing-completeness is not just about if you can write programs the way you want or a belief. It is a mathematical property about calculability. So you cannot believe or not that CSS is Turing-complete, you need a proof. In this case, because of the rule 110, CSS is Turing-complete. –  Mikaël Mayer Jun 14 '13 at 9:30
3  
@MikaëlMayer - as noted in many comments in the "110" answer, that requires user to perform an action. If user actions are requred, CSS without the user is NOT Turing complete –  DVK May 2 at 22:07

Turing-completeness is not only about "defining functions" or "have ifs/loops/etc". For example, Haskell doesn't have "loop", lambda-calculus don't have "ifs", etc...

For example, this site: http://experthuman.com/programming-with-nothing. The author uses Ruby and create a "FizzBuzz" program with only closures (no strings, numbers, or anything like that)...

There are examples when people compute some arithmetical functions on Scala using only the type system

So, yes, in my opinion, CSS3+HTML is turing-complete (even if you can't exactly do any real computation with then without becoming crazy)

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4  
Haskell and lambda-caclculus have recursion. Does CSS? You have to be crazy to do any real computation in Malbolge; in CSS, it doesn't matter how crazy you are: it won't work, CSS is not turing-complete, and that's not a matter of opinion. –  JMCF125 Oct 14 '13 at 19:12
    
As I said in the comment above, CSS3 PLUS HTML is turing-complete, because it's able to compute Rule 110 (which is known to be turing-complete). Conway's Game of Life has no recursion, and it's turing-complete too. –  Maurício Szabo Oct 15 '13 at 19:37
5  
Sorry, I couldn't find any other comment of yours in this page. But as noted in the accepted answer it is Turing-complete " (...) so long as you consider (...) user interactions to be part of the “execution” of CSS". And I don't. –  JMCF125 Oct 16 '13 at 10:38
    
@MaurícioSzabo: if the user manually advanced the state machine (kind of missing the "machine part here, but OK) AND the HTML document is infinite or dynamic and of unbounded size (but dynamic implies JS implies turing complete anyhow)... then sure, you can call CSS with a patient monkey and an infinite HTML document turing complete. But CSS by itself, or with a small, bounded number of user interactions, or with a static HTML document: not turing complete. –  Eamon Nerbonne Feb 9 at 14:21
    
Without intending to be offensive, turing completeness does not respond to anyone's opinion. –  trisweb Sep 5 at 14:08

One aspect of Turing completeness is that the halting problem is undecidable.

This means there's no general algorithm for determining whether a program will finish running or loop forever.

But we can derive such an algorithm for CSS! Here it is:

  • If the stylesheet doesn't declare any animations, then it will halt.

  • If it does have animations, then:

    • If any animation-iteration-count is infinite, and the containing selector is matched in the HTML, then it will not halt.

    • Otherwise, it will halt.

That's it. Since we just showed that the halting problem is decidable for CSS, it follows that CSS is not Turing complete.

(Other people have mentioned IE 6, which allows for embedding arbitrary JavaScript expressions in CSS; that will obviously add Turing completeness. But that feature is non-standard, and nobody in their right mind uses it anyway.)

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CSS is not a programming language, so the question of turing-completeness is a meaningless one. If programming extensions are added to CSS such as was the case in IE6 then that new synthesis is a whole different thing.

CSS is merely a description of styles; it does not have any logic, and its structure is flat.

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Also (IIRC), there is some ambiguity about which styles take precedence when multiple conflicting (duplicate) styles are used. And then there is the slightly different ways that different browsers implement/interpret markup styles to deal with. –  David R Tribble Mar 23 '10 at 2:40
35  
"CSS is not a programming language, so the question of turing-completeness is a meaningless one." Tautological sentences are tautological. –  Adam Davis Mar 23 '10 at 13:10

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