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If you can target iOS 4.0 or above

Using GCD, is it the best way to create singleton in Objective C (thread safe)?

+ (instancetype)sharedInstance
{
    static dispatch_once_t once;
    static id sharedInstance;
    dispatch_once(&once, ^{
        sharedInstance = [[self alloc] init];
    });
    return sharedInstance;
}
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Is there a way to prevent users of the class from calling alloc/copy? –  NicolasMiari Jun 17 '12 at 20:58
3  
dispatch_once_t and dispatch_once appear to have been introduced in 4.0, not 4.1 (see: developer.apple.com/library/ios/#documentation/Performance/…) –  Ben Flynn Jul 10 '12 at 23:29
1  
I know its inconsequential in this example; but why don't people use 'new' more. dispatch_once(&once, ^{sharedInstance=[self new];} just looks that bit neater. It's equivalent to alloc+init. –  Augmental Jul 9 '13 at 22:58
2  
Be sure to start using the return type instancetype. Code completion is much better when using that instead of id. –  Mr Rogers Jul 18 '13 at 0:45
1  
@Augmental You can easily search for all locations in your project where an object is allocated if you always use [[Foo alloc] init]. If you mix this with [Foo new] your search is more complicated and requires you to type more. –  Klaas Oct 16 '13 at 9:38
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6 Answers

up vote 123 down vote accepted

This is a perfectly acceptable and thread-safe way to create an instance of your class. It may not technically be a "singleton" (in that there can only ever be 1 of these objects), but as long as you only use the [Foo sharedFoo] method to access the object, this is good enough.

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1  
How do you release it though? –  samvermette Jan 10 '12 at 23:20
41  
@samvermette you don't. the point of a singleton is that it will always exist. thus, you don't release it, and the memory gets reclaimed with the process exits. –  Dave DeLong Jan 10 '12 at 23:34
3  
@Dave DeLong: In my opinion purpose of having singleton is not a certainty of its immortality, but certainty that we have one instance. What if that singleton decrement a semaphore? You can't just arbitrary say that it will always exists. –  jacekmigacz Jan 25 '13 at 13:40
2  
@hooleyhoop Yes, in its documentation. "If called simultaneously from multiple threads, this function waits synchronously until the block has completed." –  Kevin Aug 17 '13 at 22:31
1  
@WalterMartinVargas-Pena the strong reference is held by the static variable –  Dave DeLong Nov 15 '13 at 0:42
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instancetype

instancetype is just one of the many language extensions to Objective-C, with more being added with each new release.

Know it, love it.

And take it as an example of how paying attention to the low-level details can give you insights into powerful new ways to transform Objective-C.

http://nshipster.com/instancetype/


+ (instancetype)sharedInstance
{
    static dispatch_once_t once;
    static id sharedInstance;

    dispatch_once(&once, ^
    {
        sharedInstance = [self new];
    });

    return sharedInstance;
}

+ (Class*)sharedInstance
{
    static dispatch_once_t once;
    static Class *sharedInstance;

    dispatch_once(&once, ^
    {
        sharedInstance = [self new];
    });

    return sharedInstance;
}
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3  
amazing tip, thanks! instancetype is a contextual keyword that can be used as a result type to signal that a method returns a related result type. ... With instancetype, the compiler will correctly infer the type. –  Joe Blow Nov 18 '13 at 17:32
    
instancetype shouldn't be used for singletons (neither should id). More importantly, [[self alloc] init] or [self new] shouldn't be used. A singleton should be a specific class, not whichever subclass that happens to have sharedInstance called on it first. Any subclass that has a singleton needs to define it's own method (or at minimum reimplement sharedInstance to have its own copy with the proper class). –  Ray Lillywhite Mar 31 at 0:57
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Dave is correct, that is perfectly fine. You may want to check out Apple's docs on creating a singleton for tips on implementing some of the other methods to ensure that only one can ever be created if classes choose NOT to use the sharedFoo method.

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7  
eh... that's not the greatest example of creating a singleton. Overriding the memory management methods is not necessary. –  Dave DeLong Apr 19 '11 at 18:33
17  
This is completely invalid using ARC. –  logancautrell Nov 1 '11 at 1:55
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You can avoid that the class be allocated with overwriting the alloc method.

@implementation MyClass

static BOOL useinside = NO;
static id _sharedObject = nil;


+(id) alloc {
    if (!useinside) {
        @throw [NSException exceptionWithName:@"Singleton Vialotaion" reason:@"You are violating the singleton class usage. Please call +sharedInstance method" userInfo:nil];
    }
    else {
        return [super alloc];
    }
}

+(id)sharedInstance
{
    static dispatch_once_t p = 0;
    dispatch_once(&p, ^{
        useinside = YES;
        _sharedObject = [[MyClass alloc] init];
        useinside = NO;
    });   
    // returns the same object each time
    return _sharedObject;
}
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This answers my question in the comments above. Not that I'm so much for defensive programming, but... –  NicolasMiari Nov 14 '13 at 2:50
2  
My rule is to never add these complications. What do you get from it? Calling [[MyClass alloc] init] from outside sharedInstance is a bug in the code which won't work, no matter what you try. And this isn't thread safe anyway: If Thread A called sharedInstance, and Thread B calls [MyClass alloc] between "useinside = YES" and "useinside = NO"; there's no protection. –  gnasher729 Mar 4 at 18:40
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@interface MySingleton : NSObject

+(instancetype) sharedInstance;

+(instancetype) alloc __attribute__((unavailable("alloc not available, call sharedInstance instead")));
-(instancetype) init __attribute__((unavailable("init not available, call sharedInstance instead")));
+(instancetype) new __attribute__((unavailable("new not available, call sharedInstance instead")));
-(instancetype) copy __attribute__((unavailable("copy not available, call sharedInstance instead")));

@end

@implementation MySingleton

+(instancetype) sharedInstance {
    static dispatch_once_t pred;
    static id shared = nil;
    dispatch_once(&pred, ^{
        shared = [[super alloc] initUniqueInstance];
    });
    return shared;
}

-(instancetype) initUniqueInstance {
    return [super init];
}

@end
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If you want to make sure that [[MyClass alloc] init] returns the same object as sharedInstance (not necessary in my opinion, but some folks want it), that can be done very easily and safely using a second dispatch_once:

- (instancetype)init
{
    static dispatch_once_t once;
    static Class *sharedInstance;

    dispatch_once(&once, ^
    {
        // Your normal init code goes here. 
        sharedInstance = self;
    });

    return sharedInstance;
}

This allows any combination of [[MyClass alloc] init] and [MyClass sharedInstance] to return the same object; [MyClass sharedInstance] would just be a bit more efficient. How it works: [MyClass sharedInstance] will call [[MyClass alloc] init] once. Other code could call it as well, any number of times. The first caller to init will do the "normal" initialisation and store the singleton object away in the init method. Any later calls to init will completely ignore what alloc returned and return the same sharedInstance; the result of alloc will be deallocated.

The +sharedInstance method will work as it always did. If it isn't the first caller to call [[MyClass alloc] init], then the result of init is not the result of the alloc call, but that is OK.

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