Could someone please explain multiplexing in relation to HTTP/2 and how it works?

up vote 71 down vote accepted

Put simply, multiplexing allows your Browser to fire off multiple requests at once on the same connection and receive the requests back in any order.

And now for the much more complicated answer...

When you load a web page, it downloads the HTML page, it sees it needs some CSS, some JavaScript, a load of images... etc.

Under HTTP/1.1 you can only download one of those at a time on your HTTP/1.1 connection. So your browser downloads the HTML, then it asks for the CSS file. When that's returned it asks for the JavaScript file. When that's returned it asks for the first image file... etc. HTTP/1.1 is basically synchronous - once you send a request you're stuck until you get a response. This means most of the time the browser is not doing very much, as it has fired off a request, is waiting for a response, then fires off another request, then is waiting for a response... etc. Of course complex sites with lots of JavaScript do require the Browser to do lots of processing, but that depends on the JavaScript being downloaded so, at least for the beginning, the delays inherit to HTTP/1.1 do cause problems. Typically the server isn't doing very much either (at least per request - of course they add up for busy sites), because it should respond almost instantly for static resources (like CSS, JavaScript, images, fonts... etc.) and hopefully not too much longer even for dynamic requests (that require a database call or the like).

So one of the main issues on the web today is the network latency in sending the requests between browser and server. It may only be tens or perhaps hundreds of millisecond, which might not seem much, but they add up and are often the slowest part of web browsing - especially as websites get more complex and require extra resources (as they are getting) and Internet access is increasingly via mobile (with slower latency than broadband).

As an example let's say there are 10 resources that your web page needs to load after the HTML is loaded itself (which is a very small site by today's standards as 100+ resources is common, but we'll keep it simple and go with this example). And let's say each request takes 100ms to travel across the Internet to web server and back and the processing time at either end is negligible (let's say 0 for this example for simplicity sake). As you have to send each resource and wait for a response one at a time, this will take 10 * 100ms = 1,000ms or 1 second to download the whole site.

To get around this, browsers usually open multiple connections to the web server (typically 6). This means a browser can fire off multiple requests at the same time, which is much better, but at the cost of the complexity of having to set-up and manage multiple connections (which impacts both browser and server). Let's continue the previous example and also say there are 4 connections and, for simplicity, let's say all requests are equal. In this case you can split the requests across all four connections, so two will have 3 resources to get, and two will have 2 resources to get totally the ten resources (3 + 3 + 2 + 2 = 10). In that case the worst case is 3 round times or 300ms = 0.3 seconds - a good improvement, but this simple example does not include the cost of setting up those multiple connections, nor the resource implications of managing them (which I've not gone into here as this answer is long enough already but setting up separate TCP connections does take time and other resources - to do the TCP connection, HTTPS handshake and then get up to full speed due to TCP slow start).

HTTP/2 allows you to send off multiple requests on the same connection - so you don't need to open multiple connections as per above. So your browser can say "Gimme this CSS file. Gimme that JavaScript file. Gimme image1.jpg. Gimme image2.jpg... Etc." to fully utilise the one single connection. This has the obvious performance benefit of not delaying sending of those requests waiting for a free connection. All these requests make their way through the Internet to the server in parallel. The server responds to each one, and then they start to make their way back. In fact it's even more powerful than that as the web server can respond to them in any order it feels like and send back files in different order, or even break each file requested into pieces and intermingle the files together. This has the secondary benefit of one heavy request not blocking all the other subsequent requests (known as the head of line blocking issue). The web browser then is tasked with putting all the pieces back together. In best case (assuming no bandwidth limits - see below), if all 10 requests are fired off pretty much at once in parallel, and are answered by the server immediately, this means you basically have one round trip or 100ms or 0.1 seconds, to download all 10 resources. And this has none of the downsides that multiple connections had for HTTP/1.1! This is also much more scalable as resources on each website grow (currently browsers open up to 6 parallel connections under HTTP/1.1 but should that grow as sites get more complex?).

This diagram shows the differences, and there is an animated version too.

Note: HTTP/1.1 does have the concept of pipelining which also allows multiple requests to be sent off at once. However they still had to be returned in order they were requested, in their entirety, so nowhere near as good as HTTP/2, even if conceptually it's similar. Not to mention the fact this is so poorly supported by both browsers and servers that it is rarely used.

One thing highlighted in below comments is how bandwidth impacts us here. Of course your Internet connection is limited by how much you can download and HTTP/2 does not address that. So if those 10 resources discussed in above examples are all massive print-quality images, then they will still be slow to download. However, for most web browser, bandwidth is less of a problem than latency. So if those ten resources are small items (particularly text resources like CSS and JavaScript which can be gzipped to be tiny), as is very common on websites, then bandwidth is not really an issue - it's the sheer volume of resources that is the problem and HTTP/2 looks to address that. This is also why concatenation is used in HTTP/1.1 as another workaround, so for example all CSS is often joined together into one file: the amount of CSS downloaded is the same but by doing it as one resource there are huge performance benefits (though less so with HTTP/2 and in fact some say concatenation should be an anti-pattern under HTTP/2 - though there are arguments against doing away with it completely too).

To put it as a real world example: assume you have to order 10 items from a shop for home delivery:

  • HTTP/1.1 with one connection means you have to order them one at a time and you cannot order the next item until the last arrives. You can understand it would take weeks to get through everything.

  • HTTP/1.1 with multiple connections means you can have a (limited) number of independent orders on the go at the same time.

  • HTTP/1.1 with pipelining means you can ask for all 10 items one after the other without waiting, but then they all arrive in the specific order you asked for them. And if one item is out of stock then you have to wait for that before you get the items you ordered after that - even if those later items are actually in stock! This is a bit better but is still subject to delays, and let's say most shops don't support this way of ordering anyway.

  • HTTP/2 means you can order your items in any particular order - without any delays (similar to above). The shop will dispatch them as they are ready, so they may arrive in a different order than you asked for them, and they may even split items so some parts of that order arrive first (so better than above). Ultimately this should mean you 1) get everything quicker overall and 2) can start working on each item as it arrives ("oh that's not as nice as I thought it would be, so I might want to order something else as well or instead").

Of course you're still limited by your the size of your postman's van (the bandwidth) so they might have to leave some packages back at the sorting office until the next day if they are full up for that day, but that's rarely a problem compared to the delay in actually sending the order across and back. Most of web browsing involves sending small letters back and forth, rather than bulky packages.

Hope that helps.

  • 4
    Awesome explanation. Example is what I needed to get this. So in HTTP/1.1 there is a waste of time between waiting for response to come and dispatching next request. HTTP/2 fixes this. Thank you. – user3448600 Apr 9 '16 at 19:56
  • But harsh I think. Could have just asked me to add a piece on bandwidth - which I'm happy to do and will do after we finish this discussion. However IMHO Bandwidth is not as big a problem for web browsing (at least in western world) - latency is. And HTTP/2 improves latency. Most websites are made up of many small resources and even if you have the bandwidth to download them (as often people do), it will be slow due to network latency. Bandwidth becomes more of an issue for large resources. I agree that those websites with massive images and other resources may still reach a bandwidth limit. – Barry Pollard Apr 10 '16 at 6:08
  • I disagree. Avoiding HOLB is one part of HTTP/2 multiplexing but so is pipelining (so you don't need multiple connections to send off multiple requests). In fact without pipelining you wouldn't even have HOLB! And persistent connections reduces the overhead of making additional requests, and is a necessary improvement for performance, but doesn't really improve the fact the items are ordered late due to the waterfall effect of loading a web page - in large part due to limited number of connections with HTTP/1.1. Latency is not "addressed" with persistent connections. – Barry Pollard Apr 10 '16 at 7:13
  • Right, and HTTP/1.1 has pipelining. Multiplexing (what the OP asked about) was introduced, again, to deal with the head-of-the-line issue. – T.J. Crowder Apr 10 '16 at 7:15
  • 1
    HTTP should not be used to enforce ordering - because it offers no such guarantees. With HTTP/2 you can suggest a priority for delivery, but not an order. Also if one of your JavaScript assets is cached, but the other is not then HTTP cannot influence even the priority. Instead you should use ordering in the HTML coupled with appropriate use of async or defer (growingwiththeweb.com/2014/02/async-vs-defer-attributes.html), or a library like require.js. – Barry Pollard May 31 at 6:08

Simple Ans (Source) :

Multiplexing means your browser can send multiple requests and receive multiple responses "bundled" into a single TCP connection. So the workload associated with DNS lookups and handshakes is saved for files coming from the same server.

Complex/Detailed Ans:

Look out the answer provided by @BazzaDP.

  • this can be achieved using pipelining also in http 1.1. The main purpose of multiplexing in HTTP2 is to not to wait for the responses in ordered way – Dhairya Lakhera Aug 19 at 8:15

HTTP/2 multiplexing is about not having large or slow resources hold up the delivery of smaller or faster resources, and about not needing multiple connections (and their attendant complexities and overhead) to download multiple resources.

Let's say you have a mine and you're excavating various types of ore from it. You have a single conveyor belt with buckets like this one:

enter image description here

(but really big). Each bucket on the conveyor can hold 1 cubic meter (1m³) of ore (let's call it a parcel), and the conveyer delivers 1 bucket/minute. So in theory, to extract 10 parcels of ore, it takes 10 buckets, and so 10 minutes. But an average miner can't load the belt as fast as it moves, they can only load half of each bucket, so when one average miner is loading the conveyor, it isn't fully-utilized; 10 parcels of ore take 20 half-filled buckets and so take 20 minutes. Only a super-miner can fully load a bucket.

When you call down to say what load to load next, the miner has to send up a note saying what's coming (in one bucket) and leave the next two buckets empty so the people at the top can move the right containers into position.

You've probably sussed by now that:

  • The conveyor belt is your network connection, its speed is your bandwidth.
  • The note and the empty buckets are the cost of latency. (It's not a good analogy for latency, but the fundamental point is that there's a cost to requesting a resource.)

Say we start out with three miners:

  • Jack has 2 parcels of silver ore to deliver
  • John has 10 parcels of spoil he needs to clear out
  • Steve has 1 parcel of silver ore to deliver

...and then at some point when they're part-way through their deliveries, two more miners show up:

  • Kevin has 6 parcels of spoil he needs to clear out
  • Sheila has 1 parcel of gold ore to deliver

(Yes, this is a very unrealistic mine. But profitable.)

At the minehead, you have plenty of people and trucks to carry away the ore and extract the silver, gold, and iron from it (and take the spoil for use in roadworks). The sooner you get the stuff out, the faster you can sell it, and you really want to sell this stuff as fast as you can before the buyers go somewhere else.

A single HTTP/1.x connection

Only one miner can load at a time. Jack steps up, sends his note in one bucket and leaves the next 2 empty, then starts loading his 2 parcels of silver ore onto the conveyor. Since Jack is an average miner, he can only load half a bucket as the conveyor goes by, so his 2 parcels take 4 buckets. So that was 3 buckets of overhead ("I'm loading silver") and 4 buckets of ore. 7 buckets at 1 bucket/minute = 7 minutes.

Then John steps up, sends his note, and leaves the next 2 buckets empty. John is a super-miner (his full name is John Henry), so he can fully load every bucket, and so his 10 parcels of ore take 10 buckets. So that was 3 buckets of overhead and 10 buckets of ore; 13 minutes.

Meanwhile, Kevin shows up, followed by Sheila; but they have to wait. It's a strict queuing system (we're British), so Kevin will be next in the queue.

Finally it's Steve's turn, then Kevin's, and then Sheila's.

So here are the buckets that went on the conveyor

[           Jack's note           ]
[              empty              ]
[              empty              ]
[     half-loaded w/silver ore    ]
[     half-loaded w/silver ore    ]
[     half-loaded w/silver ore    ]
[     half-loaded w/silver ore    ]
[           John's note           ]
[              empty              ]
[              empty              ]
[       fully-loaded w/spoil      ]
[       fully-loaded w/spoil      ]
[       fully-loaded w/spoil      ]
[       fully-loaded w/spoil      ]
[       fully-loaded w/spoil      ]
[       fully-loaded w/spoil      ]
[       fully-loaded w/spoil      ]
[       fully-loaded w/spoil      ]
[       fully-loaded w/spoil      ]
[       fully-loaded w/spoil      ]
[          Steve's note           ]
[              empty              ]
[              empty              ]
[     half-loaded w/silver ore    ]
[     half-loaded w/silver ore    ]
[          Kevins's note          ]
[              empty              ]
[              empty              ]
[        half-loaded w/spoil      ]
[        half-loaded w/spoil      ]
[        half-loaded w/spoil      ]
[        half-loaded w/spoil      ]
[        half-loaded w/spoil      ]
[        half-loaded w/spoil      ]
[        half-loaded w/spoil      ]
[        half-loaded w/spoil      ]
[        half-loaded w/spoil      ]
[        half-loaded w/spoil      ]
[        half-loaded w/spoil      ]
[        half-loaded w/spoil      ]
[          Sheila's note          ]
[              empty              ]
[              empty              ]
[      half-loaded w/gold ore     ]
[      half-loaded w/gold ore     ]

45 buckets used in total, many of them empty or half-empty. It took 45 minutes to get Sheila's gold ore, because it was stuck behind John's and Kevin's spoil. Meanwhile, the gold buyer got tired of watching spoil come out and went to another mine.

That's one HTTP/1.x connection. The browser (you at the minehead) can only receive a single resource on it at any one time. The server (the miners) may be delivering a slow resource (average miner), and/or may be dealing with a large resource (John's 10 parcels of spoil). Asking for the next resource takes time (latency).

HTTP/1.x has something called pipelining to mitigate latency, but there are issues deploying it, and it doesn't stop John's or Kevin's big loads of spoil from getting in the way of Sheila's load of gold ore.

Multiple HTTP/1.x connections

The conveyor belt firm offers you an upgrade: They can install a newer model with buckets divided in half and room for two miners to load at the bottom, each into his half of the bucket. The belt can still only carry the same amount of ore, but at least now you have two "channels" in it, so even a pair of average miners can keep it fully loaded. At the top, each half of the bucket is delivered to a different output.

So let's look at those same miners and loads:

  • Jack has 2 parcels of silver ore to deliver
  • John has 10 parcels of spoil he needs to clear out
  • Steve has 1 parcels of silver ore to deliver

then after a bit:

  • Kevin has 6 parcels of spoil he needs to clear out
  • Sheila has 1 parcels of gold ore to deliver

Jack and John both step up, send up their notes in their halves of the buckets, and leave the next 2 empty. Then Jack uses 4 half-buckets to deliver his 2 parcels of silver ore while John uses 4 half-buckets to deliver 2 of his 10 parcels of spoil. Jack steps out of the way, Steve steps up, sends up his note and leaves the empty buckets and delivers his ore, all while John is continuing to deliver his spoil.

While Steve and John are loading, Kevin shows up, followed by Sheila, and they queue. When Steve is done Kevin takes over that side, and when John is done Sheila takes over that side.

So we get these buckets, each divided in half:

[           Jack's note           |           John's note           ]
[              empty              |              empty              ]
[              empty              |              empty              ]
[           silver ore            |              spoil              ]
[           silver ore            |              spoil              ]
[           silver ore            |              spoil              ]
[           silver ore            |              spoil              ]
[          Steve's note           |              spoil              ]
[              empty              |              spoil              ]
[              empty              |              spoil              ]
[           silver ore            |              spoil              ]
[           silver ore            |              spoil              ]
[          Kevins's note          |              spoil              ]
[              empty              |              spoil              ]
[              empty              |              spoil              ]
[              spoil              |              spoil              ]
[              spoil              |              spoil              ]
[              spoil              |              spoil              ]
[              spoil              |              spoil              ]
[              spoil              |              spoil              ]
[              spoil              |              spoil              ]
[              spoil              |              spoil              ]
[              spoil              |              spoil              ]
[              spoil              |          Sheila's note          ]
[              spoil              |              empty              ]
[              spoil              |              empty              ]
[              spoil              |            gold ore             ]
[              empty              |            gold ore             ]

28 buckets instead of 45, and Sheila's gold ore arrived earlier, but was still held up by John's and Kevin's spoil. 28 minutes is better, but the gold buyer still got tired of waiting and left.

That's two HTTP/1.x connections, each of which can deliver a single resource. If a web page has multiple resources, browsers commonly open at least two connections (sometimes up to 6 or 8 for desktop browsers) so they can download things in parallel. This is complicated, and takes up more resources on the server as it has to manage more connections, but at least it gets the gold ore delivered sooner.

HTTP/2 multiplexing

The conveyor belt firm has a newer upgrade: As many loading stations at the bottom as you want, where each bucket can be tagged with what it has in it, and they all get delivered up the conveyor, where they can be offloaded according to the tags on their buckets. It's fine if the buckets are intermixed, they get sorted out at the top. It still takes one bucket to say what's coming, but you don't need to leave empty buckets anymore. And each bucket can be sent when it's ready, so average miners aren't wasting conveyor space with half-empty buckets, since they just fill their bucket and then slot it in with the other buckets going out.

So let's look at our hard-working miners:

  • Jack has 2 parcels of silver ore to deliver
  • John has 10 parcels of spoil he needs to clear out
  • Steve has 1 parcels of silver ore to deliver

then after a bit:

  • Kevin has 6 parcels of spoil he needs to clear out
  • Sheila has 1 parcel of gold ore to deliver

Since the buckets can be intermixed, and we don't need empty buckets anymore, we get something like this (each row is a full bucket):

[           Jack's note           ]
[           John's note           ]
[          Steve's note           ]
[        Jack's silver ore        ]
[           John's spoil          ]
[       Steve's silver ore        ]
[           John's spoil          ]
[        Jack's silver ore        ]
[           John's spoil          ]
[           John's spoil          ]
[           John's spoil          ]
[          Kevin's note           ] This is when Kevin shows up...
[          Sheila's note          ] ...and then Sheila soon after
[           John's spoil          ]
[          Kevin's spoil          ]
[        Sheila's gold ore        ]
[           John's spoil          ]
[          Kevin's spoil          ]
[           John's spoil          ]
[          Kevin's spoil          ]
[           John's spoil          ]
[          Kevin's spoil          ]
[           John's spoil          ]
[          Kevin's spoil          ]
[          Kevin's spoil          ]

25 buckets, 5 with notes and 20 fully-loaded with ore. 25 minutes. The reduction from 28 is mostly because of the improvement in the tagging system (no more empty buckets). We couldn't make the conveyor belt faster, we just used it more efficiently.

But! Notice how Sheila's gold ore wasn't held up by John and Kevin's spoil anymore, it just got intermixed (multiplexed) with the stream of buckets going up to the minehead when it was ready (when Sheila showed up). So it got delivered after just 16 minutes, instead of 28 or 45. The buyer was still there. Profit!

That's HTTP/2 multiplexing. One connection, multiple requests, intermixed responses.

It happened to play out that when there was only one resource to send (just before Kevin and Sheila showed up, when John was still loading spoil and he was the only one doing anything) it was our super-miner John who was doing it, so we didn't have half-empty buckets. If I were starting this answer from scratch I'd tweak it so it was Jack instead and we had a couple of half-empty buckets, because we could have had, HTTP/2 can't magically make a slow resource (Jack loading his silver ore) faster, so if it had been Jack working alone, we would have had half-empty buckets. (I'd also tweak it so that a normal miner could fully-load buckets and just make Jack slow, since slow resources are probably not the norm.)

More: HTTP/2 Frequently Asked Questions.

  • Well I disagree with this analogy. It completely ignores the time taken to make the request and suggests servers are continually serving data to browsers rather than web browsing (mostly) being a request-response process. It also suggests servers (miners) are slow to send data across the network which is incorrect. From your link: "Multiplexing addresses these problems by allowing multiple request and response messages to be in flight at the same time; it’s even possible to intermingle parts of one message with another on the wire." You've concentrated on the 2nd half and ignored the 1st. – Barry Pollard Apr 10 '16 at 12:53
  • I did indeed handwave the request part, and I flagged that up. Re servers sending data at less than network speed: That's what "slow resources" are. Slowly-acquired resources absolutely exist in the real world. What I'm trying to do here is show the original problem and the multiplexing. I don't think that's remotely downvote-worthy, frankly. Not like I pretended all requests could be satisfied simultaneously as though they had no data, like the first version of A Certain Answer did. :-) – T.J. Crowder Apr 10 '16 at 13:00
  • @BazzaDP: (Meant to tag you on the above). What I should do is have the conveyor stop when there's nothing to send up, put a small pneumatic tube next to it that only works when the conveyor stops, and wait for a message to arrive by that tube asking for the next thing. I think that would do it. Then in the second case I'd have two tubes, and in the third replace the tube with...oh, a telephone or some such. Too busy to do that right now, though. – T.J. Crowder Apr 10 '16 at 13:09
  • 2
    Losing track of your already overly complex analogy now. You called out some things in my (already overly long) answer that were (perhaps) not explained fully for brevity sake, suggested my answer (that the OP thought was an "awesome explanation" btw) was "not good", "fundamentally incorrect and misleading" and down voted me (which you reversed after I clarified the answer - so thanks for that). Now when I do the same to you, you complain that's not downvote-worthy? It's obvious we won't agree on this so let's let the community decide which is the better answer. I'm out. – Barry Pollard Apr 10 '16 at 13:27
  • @BazzaDP: I'm sorry if you find the analogy hard to follow, and that you had an issue with my raising significant concerns with your initial answer -- which, as you pointed out, I then withdrew when you fixed them (something I hope you'll have the courtesy to do when I get a chance to address your request concern with the analogy above). I'm not trying to have an argument with you. I'm trying to make multiplexing clear without making it seem like it does magical things. – T.J. Crowder Apr 10 '16 at 14:29

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