74

Is there a way to transform a union type into an intersection type :

type FunctionUnion = () => void | (p: string) => void
type FunctionIntersection = () => void & (p: string) => void

I would like to apply a transformation to FunctionUnion to get FunctionIntersection

160

You want union to intersection? Distributive conditional types and inference from conditional types can do that. (Don't think it's possible to do intersection-to-union though, sorry) Here's the evil magic:

type UnionToIntersection<U> = 
  (U extends any ? (k: U)=>void : never) extends ((k: infer I)=>void) ? I : never

That distributes the union U and repackages it into a new union where all the consitutents are in contravariant position. That allows the type to be inferred as an intersection I, as mentioned in the handbook:

Likewise, multiple candidates for the same type variable in contra-variant positions causes an intersection type to be inferred.


Let's see if it works.

First let me parenthesize your FunctionUnion and FunctionIntersection because TypeScript seems to bind the union/intersection more tightly than function return:

type FunctionUnion = (() => void) | ((p: string) => void);
type FunctionIntersection = (() => void) & ((p: string) => void);

Testing:

type SynthesizedFunctionIntersection = UnionToIntersection<FunctionUnion>
// inspects as 
// type SynthesizedFunctionIntersection = (() => void) & ((p: string) => void)

Looks good!

Be careful that in general UnionToIntersection<> exposes some details of what TypeScript thinks is an actual union. For example, boolean is apparently internally represented as true | false, so

type Weird = UnionToIntersection<string | number | boolean>

becomes

type Weird = string & number & true & false

which in TS3.6+ gets eagerly reduced to

type Weird = never

because it's impossible to have a value which is string and number and true and false.

Hope that helps. Good luck!

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  • 11
    10x. I always learn new an interesting things from you. I was very close on this question stackoverflow.com/questions/50369299/… but really need a way to transform the union into an intersection – Titian Cernicova-Dragomir May 16 '18 at 16:21
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    This answer is awesome but I really find it hard to understand how this part "That distributes the union U and repackages it into a new union where all the consitutents are in contravariant position" works :( I can't fully grasp this contravariant position part. .I thought that this code: type Param<T> = T extends (arg: infer U) => void ? U : never; type InferredParams = Param<((a: string) => void) | ((a: number) => void)>; should give me string & number but it gives me string | number. Can you explain why? – Mariusz Pawelski Jul 21 '18 at 18:26
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    It's because bare type parameters before extends in a conditional type are distributed across any union constituents. If you want to disable distributed conditional types, you can use the trick of making the type parameter "clothed", such as a single-element tuple like this: type Param<T> = [T] extends [(arg: infer U) => void] ? U : never;. That should work the way you want. – jcalz Jul 22 '18 at 19:02
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    @RanLottem the key is distributive conditional types. The handbook explains it pretty well, in my opinion. I've expanded on it elsewhere you need more info. Good luck! – jcalz May 9 '19 at 13:51
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    @NicholasCuthbert be careful; unknown is the "correct" result. For all A and B, UTI<A | B> should equal UTI<A> & UTI<B>, right? Let B be never and note A | never is A. Now you have UTI<A> = UTI<A> & UTI<never> for all A. The only reasonable way to satisfy that is UTI<never>=unknown, since X & unknown is equal to X. If UTI<never> were never, then UTI<A> = UTI<A> & never, but since X & never=never, you're saying UTI<A> = never for all A... not great. There may be use cases for UTI<never> to be never, but it's not apparent to me, so be careful. – jcalz Feb 11 at 13:47
4

There is also a very related problem when you would like an intersection of several types, but not necessarily convert unions to intersections. There is just no way to get right to intersections without resorting to temporary unions!

The problem is that types we would like to get an intersection of might have unions inside, which will be converted to intersections too. Guards to the rescue:

// union to intersection converter by @jcalz
// Intersect<{ a: 1 } | { b: 2 }> = { a: 1 } & { b: 2 }
type Intersect<T> = (T extends any ? ((x: T) => 0) : never) extends ((x: infer R) => 0) ? R : never

// get keys of tuple
// TupleKeys<[string, string, string]> = 0 | 1 | 2
type TupleKeys<T extends any[]> = Exclude<keyof T, keyof []>

// apply { foo: ... } to every type in tuple
// Foo<[1, 2]> = { 0: { foo: 1 }, 1: { foo: 2 } }
type Foo<T extends any[]> = {
    [K in TupleKeys<T>]: {foo: T[K]}
}

// get union of field types of an object (another answer by @jcalz again, I guess)
// Values<{ a: string, b: number }> = string | number
type Values<T> = T[keyof T]

// TS won't believe the result will always have a field "foo"
// so we have to check for it with a conditional first
type Unfoo<T> = T extends { foo: any } ? T["foo"] : never

// combine three helpers to get an intersection of all the item types
type IntersectItems<T extends any[]> = Unfoo<Intersect<Values<Foo<T>>>>

type Test = [
    { a: 1 } | { b: 2 },
    { c: 3 },
]

// this is what we wanted
type X = IntersectItems<Test> // { a: 1, c: 3 } | { b: 2, c: 3 }

// this is not what we wanted
type Y = Intersect<Test[number]> // { a: 1, b: 2, c: 3 }

The execution in the given example goes like this

IntersectItems<[{ a: 1 } | { b: 2 }, { c: 3 }]> =
Unfoo<Intersect<Values<Foo<[{ a: 1 } | { b: 2 }, { c: 3 }]>>>> =
Unfoo<Intersect<Values<{0: { foo: { a: 1 } | { b: 2 } }, 1: { foo: { c: 3 } }}>>> =
Unfoo<Intersect<{ foo: { a: 1 } | { b: 2 } } | { foo: { c: 3 } }>> =
Unfoo<(({ foo: { a: 1 } | { b: 2 } } | { foo: { c: 3 } }) extends any ? ((x: T) => 0) : never) extends ((x: infer R) => 0) ? R : never> =
Unfoo<(({ foo: { a: 1 } | { b: 2 } } extends any ? ((x: T) => 0) : never) | ({ foo: { c: 3 } } extends any ? ((x: T) => 0) : never)) extends ((x: infer R) => 0) ? R : never> =
Unfoo<(((x: { foo: { a: 1 } | { b: 2 } }) => 0) | ((x: { foo: { c: 3 } }) => 0)) extends ((x: infer R) => 0) ? R : never> =
Unfoo<{ foo: { a: 1 } | { b: 2 } } & { foo: { c: 3 } }> =
({ foo: { a: 1 } | { b: 2 } } & { foo: { c: 3 } })["foo"] =
({ a: 1 } | { b: 2 }) & { c: 3 } =
{ a: 1 } & { c: 3 } | { b: 2 } & { c: 3 }

Hopefully this also shows some other useful techniques.

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